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b1982
08-22-2007, 04:33 PM
So I was recently diagnosed with a condition called crohn's disease, which is a form of Inflammatory bowel disease...basically my diet will be much more restricted than before

i would like to prevent weight loss, and still have energy to lift...i eat smaller meals, but because I eat these smaller meals, i feel like my appetite just goes down

could anyone recommend some meal replacement avenues for me to explore? or vitamin/nutrient supplements....

the latter is esp important since i basically gotta eliminate foods that irritate me...and with that, i'm gonna be sacrificing a lot of basic foods from which i get my everyday nutrients

ArmandSV
08-22-2007, 04:34 PM
I know maximus just was released by ALN

and its 10% off this week, seems like a good route
they might even send you a sample, to see how your body handles it

RCASEYH
08-22-2007, 07:57 PM
Ah, Crohns ... unfortunately, I know it VERY well. :( (I've had it for 20+ years.)

In a nutshell, your diet won't be as restricted (indefinitely) as you may think. During periods when it is most active, naturally you'll need to stick with foods which won't exacerbate the condition. It's difficult to recommend a particular diet, per se, as Crohns affects everyone differently when it comes to what foods they can tolerate. In my case when it would flare anything with too much fiber, too high in carbs, dairy, etc. made things worse. At times, I would find it easier to not eat at all and deal with the lack of energy. Fortunately, through a lot of trial and error I found a number of things which worked for me and wouldn't make me any sicker.

In terms of vitamins, etc ... you will definitely want to look into taking a few supplements as your body will not be able to absorb them properly from the foods you are eating. You may want to ask your primary MD or gastro guy about getting routine B-12 shots, if you aren't receiving them already. The body doesn't really absorb B-12 well if you take it in pill form, although sublingually does work to some degree. However you end up doing it, B-12 is very important to your nervous sytem and brain. It affects DNA synthesis and regulation, fatty acid synthesis and energy production. It will also help stimulate your appetite.

Some people find a super-low carb or modified Atkins type of approach to work very well (higher in proteins and fats, lower in carbs). I tried that myself and believe me, if you are looking to get super 'lean' and keep the symptoms at bay, that is definitely a way to do it. (Unfortunately for me, I ended up being TOOO lean and hated how it made me look.) Protein supplements with a whey isolate base may work for you -- they are WONDERFUL for me. (Cottage cheese, Greek Yogurt, etc ... are also really good for sources of easily digestible protein and as most are low in carbs, they generally won't cause the bloat and discomfort as other foods.)

In any event, stick with the things you know you can tolerate. Keep a log of what you've eaten and monitor the way you feel that day and the next. (If you enter all your foods into "FitDay" it is a great way of keeping track of what you have ingested.) You may just need to experiment and see what may work for you. A consultation with a nutritionist who specializes in people digestive issues may also be beneficial.

I hope I was able to help you out in some way. Don't hesitate to gimme a shout if you need be.

b1982
08-23-2007, 10:48 AM
Thanks a bunch for the info....its much appreciated...

yea right now, just goin thru trial and error...right now im just tryin to cut down on or eliminate brocolli, apples and red meat, which are unfortunately three foods i thoroughly enjoy.

how often would b-12 shots be necessary?

and you mentioned a high protein, high fat diet has proven beneficial for many crohn's patients? i read high fat is not a good thing...is it certain types of fat that you speak of? i also read that foods like pasta, which is obviously high carb, is good cuz its easy to digest...

RCASEYH
08-23-2007, 07:12 PM
Hey, anytime I can help someone out with dietary issues (particularly pertaining to Crohns) I am glad to do so.

Definitely eliminate foods too high in fiber or those more difficult to digest foods (broccoli, apples, etc.) You may want to consider foods higher in soluble rather than insoluble fiber, but it is all a balancing act when the gut is involved. (You may be able to do apples if you remove the peel.)

For forms of protein, try chicken and other 'easier' foods to digest. If you don't have issues with dairy, then cottage cheese, milk, yogurt are definitely the way to go.

As far as B-12 is concerned, I had to get shots for a while every 6 weeks or so. Fortunately, I haven't had to do that for a while as my levels have remained pretty high. When your MD does some blood work on you they will be able to let you know if / when you should go that route.

By high protein/high fat diet ... I meant that if you keep them higher than the carbs, it sometimes causes less discomfort/bloating. As I mentioned, a 'modified' Atkins type of diet (without the saturated fats and high fiber of course) has worked for some. And as for the type of fats, I am talking about the healthy fats out there ... olive oil, nut butters (peanut, almond), etc. All the foods people like "Built" advocate in their diet regimens.

Yes, foods easy to digest (like pasta) may work for some people, however, pasta is a carb which like many others can lead to bloating and diarrhea if consumed in excess. Just find what may work for you through experimentation and careful logging of what you eat. You can try a google search about the benefits of diets higher in protein/fats and lower in carbs. There is a book by Elaine Gottschall called "Breaking the Vicious Cycle" which may help you out as well. It advocates a system utilizing a SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet).

ShockBoxer
08-24-2007, 10:01 AM
It is most definitely a balancing act. I don't have Chrohns but I do have an unknown inflamatory bowel syndrome that often leads to intense cramping and periodic unconsciousness and/or shock.

I've been trying to find a balance for two years. What has been working for me, recently, is keeping my protein and carbs (starchy predominately) at nearly the same level and keeping my fats healthy and low, real low.

Combining that with an increase in soluble fiber (I take benefiber) and taking extra-strength gas-x during high protein or fat meals (the less gas that gets to my intestines the happier I am. Gas-x makes me burp a lot of it up.) and for the first time in 20 years I'm stable and happy.

My last few attacks have been planned for/deliberate. That's a kind of freedom I haven't had in decades. I hope it lasts.

RCASEYH
08-24-2007, 01:55 PM
It is most definitely a balancing act. I don't have Chrohns but I do have an unknown inflamatory bowel syndrome that often leads to intense cramping and periodic unconsciousness and/or shock.

I've been trying to find a balance for two years. What has been working for me, recently, is keeping my protein and carbs (starchy predominately) at nearly the same level and keeping my fats healthy and low, real low.

Combining that with an increase in soluble fiber (I take benefiber) and taking extra-strength gas-x during high protein or fat meals (the less gas that gets to my intestines the happier I am. Gas-x makes me burp a lot of it up.) and for the first time in 20 years I'm stable and happy.

My last few attacks have been planned for/deliberate. That's a kind of freedom I haven't had in decades. I hope it lasts.


Good advice for those with IBD. Gas-X and Lactaid may become your intimate friends. LOL

I would only say that with Crohns patients it is a little different, however, in that the bowel inflamation will narrow and twist the intestine. Because of this constriction a diet too high in fiber (soluble or otherwise) and ingesting too many starches could result in an obstruction. Depending upon the extent of the existing damage to the intestinal tract, a perforation could potentially occur if the bolus is unable to pass.

Like SBoxer said ... it is a balancing act. You will need to find which foods at which times will work for you. Slightly more starches/soluble fiber during periods when you need more 'binding', less when the condition flips in the other direction.

SBoxer ... you mention your own issue with excess fat in your diet. I am in the medical field and your condition sounds like it could be the result of malabsorption due to an underlying gallbladder/liver issue or the intestine's inability to absorb excess bile salts produced. Medications like cholestyramine (Questran) could be beneficial.