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View Full Version : Carbs = more strength gains?



SaintGJR
09-13-2007, 11:20 AM
Hi all -

Just a quick thought - do more carbs when bulking = better strength gains in your EXPERIENCE and OPINION.

How many carbs do you guys aim for when bulking?

What kind of ratios?

Thanks.

KingWilder
09-13-2007, 11:27 AM
Carbs and more specifically calories in general are obviously going to help you put on weight (which could help you with leverage on some lifts), but without a structured routine you won't see much strength improvement.

Diet and a good routine are essential

that being said I don't typically have a set amount of carbs for a bulk and the whole ratio thing is dumb

I eat at least 1.5g protein per lb of LBM and .5g healthy fats per lb of LBM

the rest of my calories can come from carbs if I want, or more fat, or more protein

Teutates
09-13-2007, 11:30 AM
Muscles are something like 75% water, and 23% glycogen (chains of glucose).

Don't worry though, Protein that your body doesn't used is broken down and converted into glucose, just not as efficiently.

1ManRiot
09-13-2007, 11:51 AM
Muscles are something like 75% water, and 23% glycogen (chains of glucose).

Don't worry though, Protein that your body doesn't used is broken down and converted into glucose, just not as efficiently.
Not always. The large majority of excess amino acids are simply deaminated and excreted, leaving the carbon skeleton to be oxidized to be used as energy or simply converted to carbohydrate and/or fatty acids.

SaintGJR
09-13-2007, 12:13 PM
Thanks all - should carbs be eaten in each meal?

1ManRiot
09-13-2007, 12:16 PM
Thanks all - should carbs be eaten in each meal?
Too difficult to say. Whole diet dictates carb intake. Also worth noting that everyone responds to carbs so differently. A high carb environment is also protein-sparing.

Best bet, post up your diet/stats/regime and have it critiqued (if there is anyone here to critique it??)

SaintGJR
09-13-2007, 12:26 PM
Why would whole diet dictate it? Surely my goals are more important.

Teutates
09-13-2007, 12:35 PM
Not always. The large majority of excess amino acids are simply deaminated and excreted, leaving the carbon skeleton to be oxidized to be used as energy or simply converted to carbohydrate and/or fatty acids.

Yes, that is what I meant. The reason it is not very efficient is because of this and other factors.

MMEI
09-13-2007, 12:43 PM
If your muscle glycogen stores are empty, and you eat more carbs, then your gains will improve.

If your muscle glycogen stores are already full, and you eat more carbs, then they won't appreciably improve over eating fats or pro.

1ManRiot
09-13-2007, 12:46 PM
Why would whole diet dictate it? Surely my goals are more important.
:windup:

Your whole diet would dictate where and when you need carbs, and in what form. Your goals without your training regime and diet are irrelevant.

Trevor M.
09-13-2007, 01:32 PM
Not always. The large majority of excess amino acids are simply deaminated and excreted,

This is a very commonly believed myth. However, Only in certain medical conditions does the body excrete amino acids through the urine. You are right though, following Deamination, which is the process in which its nitrogen molecule is removed (the nitrogen molecule later comes into play in the formation of urea) these now "carbon skeletons" can enter different metabolic pathways, based on a number of variables...

All amino acids, fyi, go through the deamination process.

1ManRiot
09-13-2007, 01:52 PM
Interesting stuff mate. Any literature to go on? I apprecaite it isn't all excreted, but I though a large amount of overspill would certainly find its way out that way (in normal circumstances)

Trevor M.
09-13-2007, 02:03 PM
Understand, it is possible for a very small number of amino acids to appear in the urine. Although, only in certain medical conditions should "large amounts" be present in the urine. The general name for such a condition is Aminoaciduria.