PDA

View Full Version : how much of your daily protien has to come from meat?



curaja_kupo
09-22-2007, 11:09 AM
I am just wondering if it even matters where your protien comes from. Only about 50 of grams of protien I ate yesterday came from meat. The rest almond butter, whole milk yogurt,walnuts,brazil nuts,sweetpotatoe, and oatmeal

a total of 111 grams. I ate more then this but those were the foods that gave protien.

theravingphycho
09-22-2007, 11:16 AM
i count everything really as protein sources


Just because something is classed as a incomplete protein doesnt mean to say the aminos dont get used all the same :)

around 35% of my protein intake comes from incomplete sources at times, sometimes its 20%

VikingWarlord
09-22-2007, 11:20 AM
Cottage cheese, nuts, meat, eggs, whatever. Get most of it from whole foods and you're fine. Some protein is better than others, but as long as you're getting enough and in a variety, it's not a problem

Teutates
09-22-2007, 11:32 AM
If you a lot of protein you should be ok as long as some of the source is meat. This is because plant protein doesn't always contain enough of the essential proteins your body cannot synthesize.

If you wanted to check to see if you get enough specifically (DRV that is) you can look up eat protein source and see what percent of the EAA you are getting and if it is enough. I.E Almonds (http://www.whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=nutrientprofile&dbid=96)
Type the food you are looking for in the search box, go down to Food / Spice, find the food (example Tuna: see Tuna: Tuna: nutritionalprofile) click on nutritionalprofile and there should be a link that says: For an in-depth nutritional profile click here: Tuna.

EAA: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essential_amino_acid) (click to see DRV)

isoleucine, leucine, lysine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine, valine and phenylalanine.

theravingphycho
09-22-2007, 11:36 AM
This is because plant protein doesn't always contain enough of the essential proteins your body cannot synthesize.

What about soya then? Millet as well? :thumbup:

curaja_kupo
09-22-2007, 11:45 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Omron-HBF-306-Body-Fat-Analyzer/dp/B00006WNPU/ref=pd_bbs_5/104-7189130-4883947?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1190482963&sr=8-5

I just bought that. I work at whole foods part time and get a 20 percent discount so buying food there should be not prob.

theravingphycho
09-22-2007, 11:50 AM
Those kind of bodyfat analyzers are pants at giving a accurate reading. Readings fluctuate due to hydrations levels and other factors

Calipers are far better for the purpose, as is a tape measure and a camera ;)

mikey4402
09-22-2007, 11:52 AM
Cottage cheese, nuts, meat, eggs, whatever. Get most of it from whole foods and you're fine. Some protein is better than others, but as long as you're getting enough and in a variety, it's not a problem

why?


Im with the guy that spells psycho wrong (only kidding;) )
i count protien as protien dont really care where it comes from. I try to eat all whole foods. However somedays i end up drinking all my protien.

mikey4402
09-22-2007, 11:53 AM
Those kind of bodyfat analyzers are pants at giving a accurate reading. Readings fluctuate due to hydrations levels and other factors

Calipers are far better for the purpose, as is a tape measure and a camera ;)

or you could just use your eyes and a mirror.

theravingphycho
09-22-2007, 11:55 AM
lol no problems mikey ;)

As for some protein better than others its debateable if you wanna get pedantic and look at amino profiles, cue post number 100094398...zzzzzzzz

Only thing that i do not count as a good protein source ie Gelatine, thats just a all out crap source!

Millet and soya are the best veggie sources out there actually, millet has more leucine and isoleucine than eggs :)

theravingphycho
09-22-2007, 11:57 AM
or you could just use your eyes and a mirror.
Problem with that i find personallt is that changes come gradually, ive never once woke up and said WOW look how lean i am, you just get used to it. I like taking pictures once a month as it makes the changes more noticeable in addition to the mirror of course to see if i can spot a new vein :D

Teutates
09-22-2007, 12:16 PM
What about soya then? Millet as well? :thumbup:

Don't think Millet does, but don't know much about it. Yeah, soybean is one of those plants that has complete proteins, so all the essentials, not as in high a percentage as meats though. :)

theravingphycho
09-22-2007, 12:26 PM
Don't think Millet does, but don't know much about it. Yeah, soybean is one of those plants that has complete proteins, so all the essentials, not as in high a percentage as meats though. :)

Actually TVP (soya mince) is 50% protein by weight, no meat product offers this. Millet is higher in leucine and isoleucine than eggs

Teutates
09-22-2007, 12:32 PM
Hmm, interesting. What do they taste like and what do you eat em with?

theravingphycho
09-22-2007, 12:45 PM
TVP itself is tasteless and flavouring can be done with some stock to rehydrate it. It looks like brown ground beef usually

Ive used it whenever i fancy a change. It goes great in lasagne, spaghetti blognese and ive even made burgers from it. I find its lighter and has a nicer texture than meat.

I once gave a TVP burger to a die hard carnivore, suffice to say he couldnt tell the difference :D

Its pretty cheap too where i am. I can generally get 1kilo for less than 3 ($6) and thats 500g of pure protein

Another thing i like about TVP is it keeps for ages as its dried, doesnt need a fridge or take up freezer space so i can buy a few kilos at a time and fill my cupboards :D

Teutates
09-22-2007, 02:05 PM
I went and got some TVP to try it out before I order it in bulk (much cheaper in bulk). If it works out I will fit it into my diet. :D

10oz (less than 1/3 of a kilo) cost me 3 dollars.

Not sure if I want to try millet. Sounds nasty.

theravingphycho
09-22-2007, 02:10 PM
Good stuff mate. Make sure you flavour it well otherwise you will be disappointed

Millet is nice, its made the same way as porridge, its kindve like couscous

Built
09-22-2007, 02:37 PM
Actually TVP (soya mince) is 50% protein by weight, no meat product offers this. Millet is higher in leucine and isoleucine than eggs

TVP is only this high in protein by weight because it's dry. Hydrate it and eat it and you'll find the proportion of protein in it by weight is quite low. Looking up the nutrient content of defatted soy flour (from which TVP is made), we see that 100g contains 7.25g of water. Of the remaining 92.75g of solid, 51.46g are from protein - meaning the proportion of dehydrated weight coming from protein is 55.5%.

Compare this with, say, the lean buffalo I ate for dinner last night:

100g of lean raw buffalo sirloin contains 74.4g of water. (Source: USDA nutrient database) (http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/cgi-bin/list_nut_edit.pl)

Of the remaining 25.6g that are actually FOOD, 21.4g are protein - in other words, 84% of the dehydrated weight of lean bison is protein.

Ignore the water, and suddenly TVP isn't such a wonder food, is it?

Millet and soy can also interfere with thyroid function. For a young healthy man on a bulk, perhaps not such a concern - but I wouldn't recommend either of these foods for daily consumption.

My .02.

RhodeHouse
09-22-2007, 05:36 PM
Beef - it worked for Arnold

theravingphycho
09-23-2007, 02:01 AM
Built i agree but who on earth wants to eat powdered Buffalo :D

Also TVP contains carbs as well so may not be suitable for carb dodgers as well. the comparison i admit was slightly flawed as i shouldve compared them like for like really (mousture content as well). But when if you rehydrate it the ratios are still the same are they not. 100g of dried and 300g of wet TVP still contain 50g of protein

Also with regards to possibly down regulating thyroid function ive yet to see any conclusive evidence that makes a real world difference. Not too long ago people were screaming about soys ability to lower endogenous test levels. Although i dont believe it myself, dont see how plant hormones can affect humans, if if did however ring true then many anabolic agents based around ECDY would make most gear look like childs play by comparison :D

Rhodehouse: Horsemeat, it worked for Serge Nubret ;)

Built
09-23-2007, 06:01 AM
When you hydrate them, the proportion by weight will be significantly lower for TVP than it is for meat, if your numbers are accurate: 50g protein/300g weight = 17% of total weight as protein for TVP, vs 21.4% for buffalo.

All of this is rather silly really - who the hell looks at "proportion of water" when assessing nutrient values for food? We look at protein, carb, fat, fibre, calories...

My understanding of soy as a goitrogen hinges upon it blocking iodine concentration by the thyroid gland. Since iodine and tyrosine are combined in the thyroid to create T3 and T4, you can see how blocking concentration of one of the key players can cause problems.

Perhaps someone here has a deeper understanding of this process. I've teetered along the line of "low-ish" throid for a long time, so I'm pretty careful to avoid foods like flax, soy and millet that are known to be problematic in this regard.

theravingphycho
09-23-2007, 07:41 AM
Thanks for that, some points ill have to do a bit of research on :)

DOnt worry im not gonna get pedantic about water levels etc (boooring! ;))

VikingWarlord
09-23-2007, 10:27 AM
why?

A couple of reasons.

1. Most whole foods tend to have more complete proteins than powders.
2. Given a long enough period of time, relying on supplements for your protein WILL **** up your psychological relationship with food for years, if not forever.
3. Whole foods are more satisfying.

Supplementing with a protein powder around training is great, because it's absorbed quickly to hit the time your body really wants it. Aside from that, it's just not necessary. There is a reason it's called a "supplement".

Levantar
09-24-2007, 03:33 AM
to the OP: 0% of your protein intake has to come from meat.