PDA

View Full Version : Best Complex Carbs for Cutting



M302_Imola
10-17-2007, 03:59 AM
Wanted to get your opinions on what are the best (cleanest) complex carbs for a cutting cycle. Right now sweet potatoes and whole wheat pasta are at the top of my list. Are black beans benefitial?

MMEI
10-17-2007, 11:06 AM
Yep, i'd say legumes and sweet potatos are the most nutritous carb sources out there.

Also, try Qinoa, and oatmeal is like pasta if you like that.

Keith
10-17-2007, 11:36 AM
I don't know what you mean by 'best' and 'clean' but the carbs I typically eat throughout my cut and bulk are sweet potatoes, red potatoes and oatmeal.

M302_Imola
10-17-2007, 11:45 AM
I forgot about oatmeal, I eat about 1 1/2 cups a day.

Warrior10
10-20-2007, 02:06 PM
Please keep this thread going, I'd like to see more of the better carbs for cutting.

Built
10-20-2007, 02:18 PM
Dextrose
sweet potatoes
rice (white or brown)
oats

My avoid list: wheat. Reason being the stuff makes me hungry.

To the OP - it really doesn't matter which carb you choose. The biggest deal on a cut is appetite control. If a food makes you extra hungry, best save that for bulking.

Stumprrp
10-20-2007, 02:27 PM
To the OP - it really doesn't matter which carb you choose. The biggest deal on a cut is appetite control. If a food makes you extra hungry, best save that for bulking.

couldnt agree more, stop over thinking it, eat what is healthy and less then you usually do.

Built
10-20-2007, 02:31 PM
If you're Stumprrp, that means one less Baconator a day. ;)

DieselDan1014
10-21-2007, 06:35 AM
sweet potatoes and oats and brown rice are all ya need

Warrior10
10-22-2007, 07:32 PM
Keep it 'comin

and why exactly is brown rice better than white rice in this context?

MMEI
10-22-2007, 08:05 PM
Brown rice is lower glycemic, which means its digested much slower than white rice. This means that you have lower insulin (fat storage hormone) levels and it stays in your belly longer--you will have a more constant stream of energy.

Slim Schaedle
10-22-2007, 08:41 PM
Brown rice is lower glycemic, which means its digested much slower than white rice. This means that you have lower insulin (fat storage hormone) levels and it stays in your belly longer--you will have a more constant stream of energy.

A "constant stream of energy" would simply be the result of regeneration of ATP from ADP through glyocolysis, Krebs Cycle, or other means.

With reference to glycolysis, a constant supply of energy would simply rely on adequate glyogen storage, which does not directly correlate to whatever benefit there is of eating low glycemic carbs.

So, this simply means eating more carbs.

Even with the absence of glycogen, the constant supply of energy will come from another source such as fatty acid oxidation.

Of course, one could argue that a lower glycemic source would ensure more of the converted glucose would actually be delivered to the muscle as opposed to adipose tissue, as there would there would be less of an insulin response from the pancreas during a given time.

But then again we all know the effects of eating carbohydrate with other macros such as protein and fats.


While I am rambling, I believe white rice and brown rice are extremely similar in their GI rating.

MMEI
10-22-2007, 08:54 PM
A "constant stream of energy" would simply be the result of regeneration of ATP from ADP through glyocolysis or other means.

With reference to glycolysis, a constant supply of energy would simply rely on adequate glyogen storage, which does not directly correlate to whatever benefit there is of eating low glycemic carbs.

So, this simply means eating more carbs.

Even with the absence of glycogen, the constant supply of energy will come from another source such as fatty acid oxidation.

Of course, one could argue that a lower glycemic source would ensure more of the converted glucose would actually be delivered to the muscle as opposed to adipose tissue, as there would there would be less of an insulin response from the pancreas during a given time.

But then again we all know the effects of eating carbohydrate with other macros such as protein and fats.


While I am rambling, I believe white rice and brown rice are extremely similar in their GI rating.

Good point, but isn't it a matter of blood sugar? Higher glycemic foods will cause a spike and crash of blood sugar, whereas lower ones will have a more steady, yet somewhat elevated blood sugar level. I think.

But in the white vs brown argument, brown is slightly more nutritious in terms of vitamins and fiber.

krboyd7
10-23-2007, 02:59 AM
All you have to do is make sure you stick with wholegrain/wholewheat carbs.

I eat wholegrain rice,wholewheat pasta,wholemeal bread,oatcakes,sweet potato.
Avoid white carbs! (unless post workout) The high GI carbs provide that great insulin spike in the window of op.