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View Full Version : how do you know what are "good carbs" ?



xstalkrx
10-28-2007, 11:15 PM
For instance...im sure that the carbs in Ramen Noodles aren't considered the greatest of carb sources?

Im just curious.

and yes i do use ramen noodles to mix with my lean beef....dont know how much good that is doing me...you can critique that as well.

Thanks.

KingWilder
10-29-2007, 09:09 AM
common sense usually (things low in sugar, not highly processed, no trans fat, etc)

fruits, veggies, whole grains, legumes, and milk tend to be the best quality of carbs in my opinion

Dimiss
10-29-2007, 02:34 PM
Foods with low glycemic index
Note: As far as fruits go, if it tastes too sweet it's ok to assume it has an elevated GI.

Fruits
apples (40)
banana (51) Ok Green
blueberries
cherries (22)
grapefruit (25)
green grapes (43)
orange (51)
pears (33)
plums (24)
prunes (29)
raspberries
tomatoes

Vegetables
asparagus
beans (all)
broccoli
cabbage
carrots
garden beans
garlic
kidney beans
lettuce
mushrooms
onions
peas
peppers
spinach
squash
bitter melon

Drinks
unsweetened tea

Low GI Carbs
Bread: Whole Wheat, Multi-grain, Pumpernickel, Rye, Sourdough, Oatmeal
Corn
cooked couscous
whole grain crackers
cooked oatmeal
Pasta cooked al dente
Green, split or black eyed peas
Whole grain pita, 6"
Cooked brown rice
small whole grain roll

Other food
barley wheat
dairy products
egg noodles
eggs
meat
nuts
steelcut slow-cooked oatmeal
seeds
fructose (if crystalized or processed it still causes other health problems)

Dimiss
10-29-2007, 02:35 PM
The glycemic index pyramid is a pyramid-shaped guide to eating foods, as determined by their glycemic index. (The shape is used to illustrate how to eat more of lower GI foods than of high GI foods.)

Vegetables (at least 5 portions a day)
Gross bread, grain, pasta, and other low glycemic, amyloid food (36 portions daily)
Fruit (23 times a day)
Nuts, seeds and shell fruits (eat 13 times a day), and oils pressed from these (12 times a day)
Pure proteins like meat, fish, poultry, eggs (up to 2 portions daily red meat not more than 12 times a day)
Dairy products (12 portions daily, preferably low-fat products)
White bread, rice, potatoes, sweets (cookies and cakes) eat rarely

sharkall2003
10-29-2007, 02:38 PM
GI means pretty much nothing when you start eating more than one food together. Just so you know.

Chickenlegs
10-29-2007, 02:45 PM
GI means pretty much nothing when you start eating more than one food together. Just so you know.

Huh? Can you elaborate?

RCASEYH
10-29-2007, 03:19 PM
If foods of varying degrees on the glycemic index are eaten in combination, the foods help to balance each other out. So, higher GI foods will become lower depending upon with what other foods they are eaten.

Also ... check out info about glycemic load. The glycemic load (GL) is another way to assess the impact of carbohydrate consumption that takes the glycemic index into account, but gives a fuller picture than does glycemic index alone. A GI value tells you only how rapidly a particular carbohydrate turns into sugar. It doesn't tell you how much of that carbohydrate is in a serving of a particular food. You need to know both things to understand a food's effect on blood sugar.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
10-29-2007, 04:05 PM
Huh? Can you elaborate?The GI changes if you mix foods together.

Questor
10-29-2007, 04:39 PM
Like when I drink a glass of acid with my banana, the GI of the banana goes way up.

Seriously tho. Oats, beans, and veggies for the win. Anything with added sugar or made out of flour is "not always desirable"

Chickenlegs
10-29-2007, 06:45 PM
rcaseyh, scarz,
I got you, thanks. I guess they average out?

Redscare
11-01-2007, 09:39 AM
A good mental note I keep is that if man had anything to do with production of a food item it's probably bad (like white sugar, bleached flower....). Big companies are out to make money and the cheap stuff is the tasty stuff. Addictive too. When reading the label also pay attention to the ingredients. They are often overlooked and discloses a lot of garbage for something that is titled "healthy".

Balancing foods for the ideal GI is tricky. A good rule of thumb is to consume a protein or high fiber food with carbs to prevent a serious Insulin spike. Still, if you are trying to monitor the GI for every single meal you eat you might get a little burned out unless you are that detailed or bored.

Holto
11-01-2007, 11:28 AM
rcaseyh, scarz,
I got you, thanks. I guess they average out?

And they only average out if you consume exactly 50grams of digestible carbohydrates from each food.

Google the forumla for calculating glycemic load. It's the only way to even get a picture of the glycemic response from foods.

GI is extemely outdated right now.



A good mental note I keep is that if man had anything to do with production of a food item it's probably bad (like white sugar, bleached flower....). Big companies are out to make money and the cheap stuff is the tasty stuff. Addictive too. When reading the label also pay attention to the ingredients. They are often overlooked and discloses a lot of garbage for something that is titled "healthy".

Balancing foods for the ideal GI is tricky. A good rule of thumb is to consume a protein or high fiber food with carbs to prevent a serious Insulin spike. Still, if you are trying to monitor the GI for every single meal you eat you might get a little burned out unless you are that detailed or bored.

You mean insulin response, not spike.