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JB120589
11-03-2007, 08:52 PM
Are there any ways to increase reflexes and/or reaction time?

brooklyn11
11-27-2007, 09:26 PM
JB120589, The best way to increase reaction time is to play Table Tennis. you may think I am kidding.No many of men are trying in this way.The another one is use the small balloon punching bags which are used by boxers. It will work.

Fitness workouts like Kettlebells, Hoops & Rings increases reflexes.

Guido
11-28-2007, 07:48 AM
+1 for ping pong!

235orbust
11-28-2007, 08:28 AM
reation balls

tomv
11-28-2007, 01:47 PM
Dont you want to _decrease_ reaction time?

Sensei
12-01-2007, 09:14 AM
That's a very general question - like asking "How do I get stronger?'. You can improve task-specific reaction time A LOT by practicing that specific skill/movement. What are you trying to improve your reaction time for?

VikingWarlord
12-02-2007, 08:46 AM
That's a very general question - like asking "How do I get stronger?'. You can improve task-specific reaction time A LOT by practicing that specific skill/movement. What are you trying to improve your reaction time for?

It would seem that doing something like table tennis would train the coordination responses and they'd be applicable to almost any activity. Reflexes are "see and react". Practicing anything that requires you to see, then react should help out a lot when combined with the actual activity.

My dad was a high school softball coach. He told me he read something in a magazine about a college coach who wrote numbers on 50 or so softballs, had his players stand at the plate, and fed the balls through a pitching machine. They had to stand at the plate in their batting stances and read the numbers on the balls as they went by without actually hitting them.

At first, no one could because of the speed of the ball, but doing that drill two or three times a week made them "see faster". The result was that every player's batting average increased, just by coupling that visual reaction training with the sport-specific activity.

Sensei
12-02-2007, 09:13 AM
Just like anything, there is more and less "task-specific" when it comes to reaction time. Playing video games may help your general hand-eye coordination, but it probably isn't going to help your baseball hitting or catching skills much. Sure, it's "see and react", but it's really sense and react. Coupling the proper stimulus and the appropriate response is always going to be more effective than training them separately or performing disparate tasks.

That's an interesting experiment your dad had. I'm not dogging him, but one could also guess that increased time on task (batting and closely watching pitches coming in) could have had similar results.

edit: In any case, (and I think everyone would agree) telling someone to go play table tennis if they want to improve their reaction time to a starting gun would be pretty silly...

VikingWarlord
12-02-2007, 10:56 AM
Just like anything, there is more and less "task-specific" when it comes to reaction time. Playing video games may help your general hand-eye coordination, but it probably isn't going to help your baseball hitting or catching skills much. Sure, it's "see and react", but it's really sense and react. Coupling the proper stimulus and the appropriate response is always going to be more effective than training them separately or performing disparate tasks.

That's an interesting experiment your dad had. I'm not dogging him, but one could also guess that increased time on task (batting and closely watching pitches coming in) could have had similar results.

edit: In any case, (and I think everyone would agree) telling someone to go play table tennis if they want to improve their reaction time to a starting gun would be pretty silly...

Well, it wasn't my dad's experiment, he just told me about it. I wish he could remember where he saw it. You're right about the time on task, but I think the reason that experiment was successful was that it focused specifically on the perception of the stimulus without worrying about the response. Lots of teams have batting practice, but most of them don't have the entire team's average go up. It's an interesting idea, separating the sense from the respond.

I guess I'm used to seeing a lot of the topics here referring to fight training. I'd think something like table tennis would be good to help build those sorts of reactions on a very basic level. Something coming at you, you move to react to it. That's probably what was in the back of my head was when making that post.

I do agree though, if they're disparate activities, it won't matter what the hell you do. If they're tangentially related, there may be some benefit to it.

testadura
12-02-2007, 07:23 PM
start boxing

the.powerhouse
05-19-2008, 07:44 AM
yea, quick reaction time is usually an ability to read cues in your envrionment. for a football goalkeeper for instance the ability to judge how the penalty taker is standing, and how he is approaching the ball. most of it is down to experience. it's how old tennis coaches can deal with their pro's when they are serving