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bjohnso
11-05-2007, 12:25 PM
Hello,

I've been informed by a coworker that fiber blocks nutrients from entering your body, and that in this regard eating white bread would actually be better for you than eating wheat bread. He said it would definately block protein from entering your body. He said there was no point in eating more fiber than you need. He seems to know a lot about nutrition, and kind of wowed me with how in-depth he got (we were talking about other nutritional topics too). Obviously, I always like to get more than one opinion on the matter. What say WBB?

Thanks.

P.S. He pointed me toward a book called On Food and Cooking, by someone named McGee, written in the early 1980s and updated in the mid '90s. Anyone ever read it?

Holto
11-05-2007, 12:51 PM
I personally don't buy this but I'm curious as to what others have to say. Human evolution is driven by survival and nothing else. If fiber blocked precious nutrients it would challenge our ability to survive in the wild.

RCASEYH
11-05-2007, 12:59 PM
Well, yes and no. There are two schools of thought on this subject. It may depend upon on the quantity and 'type' of fiber (soluble or insoluble). It is sometimes thought that soluble fiber may impede the effect of medications/vitamins rather than interfering with something like protein absoption. If in doubt you may need to investigate the type of fiber you are ingesting. Any fiber that becomes a sticky gel (soluble) could in therory interfere. For example ...

Fiber source ... Psyllium
Generally, when it is mixed with water or other fluids, psyllium forms a sticky gel that could block the absorption of any drugs, herbals, or foods that are taken at the same time. If psyllium is taken, drugs and meals should be taken more than one hour before or 4 hours after taking psyllium.

Psyllium seed may interfere with the body’s absorption of lithium, which is often used to treat bipolar disorder; and carbamazepine (Tegretol), which is used to treat epilepsy.

Because psyllium may decrease blood sugar levels, taking it with other blood sugar-lowering herbal products may result in hypoglycemia. Psyllium's possible blood sugar-lowering effect may increase the effects of insulin and oral drugs for diabetes.

Taking psyllium may interfere with the body’s absorption of vitamins (such as vitamin B12) and minerals (such as calcium and iron) from supplements or foods, making fewer nutrients available for the body to use. If multivitamins or vitamin-mineral combinations are being taken at the same time as psyllium, the supplement should be taken more than one hour before psyllium or more than 4 hours after psyllium.

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HOWEVER ... that being said ... There is strong evidence that fiber does not bind to minerals and vitamins and therefore does not restrict their absorption, but rather evidence exists that fermentable fiber sources improve absorption of minerals, especially calcium. The food's phytate content is mainly responsible for the reduced bioavailability of certain minerals and vitamins like calcium, zinc, vitamin C and magnesium. Article supporting this is ... Nondigestible carbohydrates and mineral bioavailability. PMID: 10395614 PubMed ... National Library of Medicine / Nation Institutes of Health
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Bottom line IMO ... eat enough of all nutrients on a daily basis and the impact of the fiber you ingest should be negligible.

Sorry for the long-winded reply.

bjohnso
11-06-2007, 12:54 PM
I personally don't buy this but I'm curious as to what others have to say. Human evolution is driven by survival and nothing else. If fiber blocked precious nutrients it would challenge our ability to survive in the wild.

That's my thinking. Is wheat even digestable in its natural form (uncooked)? I have no idea.


Well, yes and no. There are two schools of thought on this subject. It may depend upon on the quantity and 'type' of fiber (soluble or insoluble). It is sometimes thought that soluble fiber may impede the effect of medications/vitamins rather than interfering with something like protein absoption. If in doubt you may need to investigate the type of fiber you are ingesting. Any fiber that becomes a sticky gel (soluble) could in therory interfere. For example ...

Fiber source ... Psyllium
Generally, when it is mixed with water or other fluids, psyllium forms a sticky gel that could block the absorption of any drugs, herbals, or foods that are taken at the same time. If psyllium is taken, drugs and meals should be taken more than one hour before or 4 hours after taking psyllium. .

What is psyllium, and where do you get it from?


Psyllium seed may interfere with the body’s absorption of lithium, which is often used to treat bipolar disorder; and carbamazepine (Tegretol), which is used to treat epilepsy.

Because psyllium may decrease blood sugar levels, taking it with other blood sugar-lowering herbal products may result in hypoglycemia. Psyllium's possible blood sugar-lowering effect may increase the effects of insulin and oral drugs for diabetes.

Taking psyllium may interfere with the body’s absorption of vitamins (such as vitamin B12) and minerals (such as calcium and iron) from supplements or foods, making fewer nutrients available for the body to use. If multivitamins or vitamin-mineral combinations are being taken at the same time as psyllium, the supplement should be taken more than one hour before psyllium or more than 4 hours after psyllium.

-------------------------
HOWEVER ... that being said ... There is strong evidence that fiber does not bind to minerals and vitamins and therefore does not restrict their absorption, but rather evidence exists that fermentable fiber sources improve absorption of minerals, especially calcium. The food's phytate content is mainly responsible for the reduced bioavailability of certain minerals and vitamins like calcium, zinc, vitamin C and magnesium. Article supporting this is ... Nondigestible carbohydrates and mineral bioavailability. PMID: 10395614 PubMed ... National Library of Medicine / Nation Institutes of Health
--------------------------

Bottom line IMO ... eat enough of all nutrients on a daily basis and the impact of the fiber you ingest should be negligible.

Sorry for the long-winded reply.

No need to apologize, I prefer long-winded replies. Thank you for you response. Even if fiber does block nutrients, I don't know if it would be worth the trouble to seperate sources of fiber from all my other food - it would just be too much of a headache.

I still want to know though. Bump for Built.

Built
11-09-2007, 02:12 AM
I can't offer anything else here - it does block some, and a RELLY high fibre diet can keep you from accessing oh jeez I heard 15% of your calories somewhere so it MUST be true (rolls eyes) - but I don't supplement with fibre - I just make sure I get in 25 g of it a day from food and I'm done.

Max Thunder
11-09-2007, 06:51 AM
I don't think fibers are necessary. There are no definite proofs of the necessity for them, despite what the medias want you to believe.

You can eat an all-meat, fiberless diet and still digest quite well. The eskimos have done it, many animals do it, and many humans still do it.

Food naturally high in carbs and edible in the wild tend to naturally contain fibers. I.e. fruits, veggies and nuts.

Grains are crap.

Insoluble fibers promote peristaltis by irritating your intestines.
Soluble fibers do so by increasing the volume of feces.

In my opinion the amount of fibers is balanced within meat (none needed), fruits, veggies and nuts. There's no need to supplement fibers or aim for specific amounts.

bjohnso
11-09-2007, 07:14 AM
I can't offer anything else here - it does block some, and a RELLY high fibre diet can keep you from accessing oh jeez I heard 15% of your calories somewhere so it MUST be true (rolls eyes) - but I don't supplement with fibre - I just make sure I get in 25 g of it a day from food and I'm done.

Thanks Built!


I don't think fibers are necessary. There are no definite proofs of the necessity for them, despite what the medias want you to believe.

You can eat an all-meat, fiberless diet and still digest quite well. The eskimos have done it, many animals do it, and many humans still do it.

Food naturally high in carbs and edible in the wild tend to naturally contain fibers. I.e. fruits, veggies and nuts.

Grains are crap.

Insoluble fibers promote peristaltis by irritating your intestines.
Soluble fibers do so by increasing the volume of feces.

In my opinion the amount of fibers is balanced within meat (none needed), fruits, veggies and nuts. There's no need to supplement fibers or aim for specific amounts.

Why are grains crap?