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View Full Version : Does quality of meat make a big difference?



beachmuscles
12-09-2007, 04:47 PM
Once in a while I'll eat a Pollo Tropical when I'm in a bind, or have no food at the house...I always question whether the chicken quality matters? I'm sure they don't use the best quality chicken...But does it really matter? Is protein, protein? Or does the quality of the meat make a huge difference?

http://www.pollotropical.com/english/index.htm - the menu is on there...I couldn't link it for some reason...

It says:

At Pollo Tropical® our chicken is always fresh, marinated in our
special blend of tropical juices and spices, and flame grilled. We
feature made from- scratch side dishes using authentic family
recipes.
• Only the finest natural ingredients
• Original recipes, made from scratch daily
• Only 100% cholesterol-free canola oil
• Fresh (never frozen) Grade A whole chickens
• Chicken grilled with no added oils or breading

fpr
12-09-2007, 05:15 PM
meat is meat. It's just a marketing scheme.

VikingWarlord
12-09-2007, 06:24 PM
Quality of the meat only affects the quality of the meal.

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
12-09-2007, 06:43 PM
Quality of the meat only affects the quality of the meal.:withstupi:

Ricochet_kid
12-09-2007, 07:16 PM
Some cheaper chicken is treated with tri-sodium phosphate. t.s.p. is a type of salt that is used to extend the shelf-life of chicken and to enable the chicken to hold more water and be heavier. Which is handy because it is sold by weight. t.s.p. is also sold as an over-the-counter enema in parts of the states, and can be used to clean oil stains out of your driveway, and yes - this is the same t.s.p. that is used to clean your walls before you paint them.

The chicken that is loaded with t.s.p. legally has to be labelled "seasoned" chicken because of the addition of the t.s.p.

Since this is a legal thing to add to chicken, it's probably safe, but I personally try and avoid it anyway.

I was a cook in a restaurant for about 6 years, and I remember getting boxes of the "seasoned" chicken breasts, (usually used for lower quality stuff like sandwiches and fajitas) and the non seasoned ones. The seasoned ones have a slimier and rubberier consistency that I always found kind of unpleasant.

I'm not sure if this is the kind of thing you were wondering about, but if I find a restaurant that takes pride in the quality of their ingredients I really appreciate it. And the food is usually better because of it.

Those are the kinds of places that I like to support.

beachmuscles
12-09-2007, 09:19 PM
Some cheaper chicken is treated with tri-sodium phosphate. t.s.p. is a type of salt that is used to extend the shelf-life of chicken and to enable the chicken to hold more water and be heavier. Which is handy because it is sold by weight. t.s.p. is also sold as an over-the-counter enema in parts of the states, and can be used to clean oil stains out of your driveway, and yes - this is the same t.s.p. that is used to clean your walls before you paint them.

The chicken that is loaded with t.s.p. legally has to be labelled "seasoned" chicken because of the addition of the t.s.p.

Since this is a legal thing to add to chicken, it's probably safe, but I personally try and avoid it anyway.

I was a cook in a restaurant for about 6 years, and I remember getting boxes of the "seasoned" chicken breasts, (usually used for lower quality stuff like sandwiches and fajitas) and the non seasoned ones. The seasoned ones have a slimier and rubberier consistency that I always found kind of unpleasant.

I'm not sure if this is the kind of thing you were wondering about, but if I find a restaurant that takes pride in the quality of their ingredients I really appreciate it. And the food is usually better because of it.

Those are the kinds of places that I like to support.

This is exactly what I meant...Like lets say a cheap chain restaurant vs. 5-star restaurant...I'm guessing most cheap ones like Applebees, Chilis, etc...Probably use the Seasoned ones.

But does the cheap seasoned meat still have good muscle building protein, or is the protein worthless? Like lets say you went to some ghetto restaurant and got a grilled chicken sandwich, then went to a nice cafe on the beach and had a grilled chicken sandwich, does the nicer place's chicken have BETTER protein for the body? Or does it not make a difference?

It doesn't really make a huge difference to me, as I only eat out once or twice a week, but I was just curious.

I guess I'll start from the bottom of the quality chain (Fast Food)

Heres a snapshot of Wendy's Fillet of Chicken they use on the Ultimate Chicken Grill:

Ultimate Chicken Grill Fillet
Boneless, Skinless, Chicken Breast Fillets With Rib Meat Containing up to 18% of a solution of Water, Seasoning (salt, natural flavors, corn maltodextrin, autolyzed yeast extract, modified corn starch, onion powder, paprika, spice, garlic powder, sugar, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, dextrose, artificial flavors), Modified Corn Starch and Sodium Phosphates.

22g protein
1.5g fat
110 cal

But does your body utilize that 22g as well as say a piece of chicken from an expensive restauarnt, or even lets say Perdue Chicken/Tyson Chicken from the grocery store?

TopCat
12-09-2007, 10:16 PM
Chicken at one place will have the same protein as an equal amount of chicken at other places. It is a matter of what comes with your chicken from place to place. If injected with a bunch of saline to retain more water you might be able to suggest that there is less protein per lb, but I doubt it much of a difference.

Now you can make an argument about protein quality from meat to meat as red meat is different from chicken or the case of whey protein is not the same as casein. For those of you that might ask... yes I understand calories are calories but even if different meats have the same macro nutrient content they are not always of the same quality.

*qualities is being used to refer to the properties of the meat like AA, rate of absorption, digestion, and nutrients.

MMEI
12-09-2007, 10:51 PM
As far as Beef goes... Free range, grass fed beef is higher in Omega-3s, and has an absence of hormones and antibiotics. FYI.