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CÚdric
03-31-2001, 06:18 PM
How much protein? Studies have shown that the optimal protein intake for athletes undergoing high intensity exercise is 1.35g/kg/day which translates into 0.6136 grams/pound/day. Therefore a 200lb athlete would require 122.72 grams of protein.

What these studies also indicate however, is that although protein intakes should be higher than the RDA for strength training athletes, the protein intakes of most strength trained athletes is already at or above this level.

One must remember that protein intake is not the rate limiting factor in muscle mass development.

A diet which provides adequate calories will general provide enough protein as most research studies have indicated.

Thus you definitely don't need 300-600 grams of protein as I've seen some of the muscle mags suggest. And you probably are getting enough protein as it is if you are an athlete.

One possible exception is the athlete who must restrict his/her food intake to lose a great deal of weight in a short time to make a certain weight class. In this case, a small amount of supplemental protein may be warranted.

Remember more is not better when it comes to protein intake. In fact, excessive protein intake over extended periods of time can possibly seriously damage your liver and kidneys.

www.cyberpump.com/hitfaq/#Q21

Cackerot69
03-31-2001, 08:00 PM
"How much protein? Studies have shown that the optimal protein intake for athletes undergoing high intensity exercise is 1.35g/kg/day which translates into 0.6136 grams/pound/day. Therefore a 200lb athlete would require 122.72 grams of protein."

how is that optimal? what if i need 5000 calories to gain weight? do i still only eat 100g of protein per day?

"What these studies also indicate however, is that although protein intakes should be higher than the RDA for strength training athletes, the protein intakes of most strength trained athletes is already at or above this level."

good, that level is far too low.

"One must remember that protein intake is not the rate limiting factor in muscle mass development."

usually, no. most of the time its total calories, but protein can be the limiting factor.

"Thus you definitely don't need 300-600 grams of protein as I've seen some of the muscle mags suggest. And you probably are getting enough protein as it is if you are an athlete."

i disagree...you may not need the protein to repair/build muscle, but you may need it for calories. something i usually tell people when they tell me my protein is too high, is just to think of protein as a 3rd source of calories. high calories = high protein.

"One possible exception is the athlete who must restrict his/her food intake to lose a great deal of weight in a short time to make a certain weight class. In this case, a small amount of supplemental protein may be warranted."

when dieting, higher protein can help a dieter in many ways. protein acts as a thermogenic thus speeds the metabolism, it takes more energy for the body to digest protein, then carbs or fat...and protein is the macronutrient that has the least chance of becoming fat.

"Remember more is not better when it comes to protein intake. In fact, excessive protein intake over extended periods of time can possibly seriously damage your liver and kidneys."

this has never been proven.

Maki Riddington
03-31-2001, 08:16 PM
How much protein? Studies have shown that the optimal protein intake for athletes undergoing high intensity exercise is 1.35g/kg/day which translates into 0.6136 grams/pound/day. Therefore a 200lb athlete would require 122.72 grams of protein."

Cack said,
how is that optimal? what if i need 5000 calories to gain weight? do i still only eat 100g of protein per day?

Why not?
What is the standard amount of protein one needs to promote growth of muscle tissue?



"One must remember that protein intake is not the rate limiting factor in muscle mass development."

Cack said,
usually, no. most of the time its total calories, but protein can be the limiting factor.


That is very unlikely for a athlete or a BB to not take in an adequate amount of protein.



"Thus you definitely don't need 300-600 grams of protein as I've seen some of the muscle mags suggest. And you probably are getting enough protein as it is if you are an athlete."

Cack said,
i disagree...you may not need the protein to repair/build muscle, but you may need it for calories. something i usually tell people when they tell me my protein is too high, is just to think of protein as a 3rd source of calories. high calories = high protein.

Keep in mind one will adjust their ratios so it is cost effective.Try eating 300 grms of protein from food everyday.It's not cheap.Remember your footing the bill not your parents,you pay bills and so forth........

Cackerot69
03-31-2001, 09:18 PM
"Why not?
What is the standard amount of protein one needs to promote growth of muscle tissue?"

This is a much debated issue.

The great debate; The RDA vs. the "protein pushers"
For years a heated controversy has raged over whether or not extra protein will boost muscle development. On one side of the debate you have the conservative dietitians and medical community who stubbornly insist that the recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) is all you need to develop muscle. The RDA's are the official government guidelines set by the national research council. Currently the RDA for protein is based on body weight and is set at .8 grams per kilogram of body weight (that's .36 grams per lb. of body weight). For a 172 lb. man that equates to a paltry 62 grams per day. It is important to note that the RDA's were developed for the "average" sedentary person to avoid deficiency, not for athletes in hard training to gain muscle and strength. In fact, the RDA handbook even says, "no added allowance is made for stresses encountered in daily living which can give rise to increases in urinary nitrogen output."

On the other side of the debate, you have the "protein pushers" who claim that megadoses of protein are the key to muscular growth. These high protein fanatics often suggest intakes of 300-500 grams a day or more. More often than not, the protein pushers are in some way affiliated with a supplement company and have a vested interest in selling you protein powder. In other cases, these high protein advocates may be professional bodybuilders who are taking large amounts of anabolic steroids, which can allow the body to utilize more protein than normal.

So who is right, the conservative medical and scientific community or the protein pushers? The answer is neither; the optimal intake is clearly somewhere in between the two extremes. An "optimal" protein intake for bodybuilders is still unknown at this time and will require further research, but one thing is for certain: The RDA is not enough to support the added requirements for intense bodybuilding training. Even the RDA handbook itself says, "No added allowance is made here for stresses encountered in daily living which can give rise to transient increases in urinary nitrogen output. It is assumed that the subjects of experiments forming the basis for the requirement estimates are usually exposed to the same stresses as the population generally." If bodybuilding isn't an "unusual stress" beyond what is normally encountered in daily living then I don't know what is.

"That is very unlikely for a athlete or a BB to not take in an adequate amount of protein."

yes, definately unlikely, but possible.

"Keep in mind one will adjust their ratios so it is cost effective.Try eating 300 grms of protein from food everyday.It's not cheap.Remember your footing the bill not your parents,you pay bills and so forth........"

yup...i agree...not everyone can afford 300g of protein, i however, can...so i eat all the protein i want. besides, protein tastes better :)

Maki Riddington
03-31-2001, 09:24 PM
Why not?
What is the standard amount of protein one needs to promote growth of muscle tissue?"

Cack said,
This is a much debated issue.

That is my point.

Cackerot69
03-31-2001, 09:29 PM
well, if you agreed with me, why did you disagree?

Maki Riddington
03-31-2001, 09:43 PM
Cack said,
how is that optimal? what if i need 5000 calories to gain weight? do i still only eat 100g of protein per day?

Why not?
What is the standard amount of protein one needs to promote growth of muscle tissue?

Cack said,
well, if you agreed with me, why did you disagree?

You asked a question then answered it by asking another question.I simply answered your question with another question.Cack because I ask question in such a manner does not mean I disagree.If you read my post on Chris Masons "Real Deal" thread you will get a better understanding.

Cackerot69
03-31-2001, 10:09 PM
you crack me up sometimes mac, LOL...

:)

Anthony
04-01-2001, 07:28 AM
High calories = high protein. Hit the nail on the head with that.

body
04-01-2001, 08:26 AM
i am for about 1.8 grams of protien per kilo body weight which equates to about 0.8 grams of protein per pound weight.
this is from looking a paul Lemon research. well most of the recommendation is for 1.2-1.8 g of prot per kg bodyweight. with strength athletes being at the higher end of the scale.
As if i require 5,000 cals a day it would still need 1.8 g of prot per kg bodyweight. but to consume enough cals to reach 5,000 cals i would likley end up eating much more protein than the recommendation though thats as most food contains protein so i would end up eating more. the extra protein would be used as energy but if i had a choice i would rather the cals come from carbs, but without spending a small fortune and hours making my food this is unlikley to happen.
if you have the money why do you not get your urine tested to see where your nitrogen balance is? then you will know how much protein you require.