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View Full Version : Oly lifting... some interesting facts!



BFGUITAR
01-11-2008, 12:11 PM
I like to fiddle around with numbers and try to put the strength and power of an oly lifter into numbers and than compare it to every day things.

Lets assume a 250kg C+J. Definitely a strong lift for anyone, but possible.

Lets also assume the lifter is about 6 feet tall and almost 10 feet with his hands straight up. This comes to about 3 m.

Lets also assume hes lifting this weight on the planet Earth.

Using a simple equation, PE=mgh it ends up that you need at least 7350 joules of energy. Now we know that life isnt perfect and we will need to put it about 30% more energy due to the nature of the lift and other factors (balance, inefficient conversion of energy...)

So lets just say an even 10 000 joules.
In terms of calories, this is 2400 calories.

A person C+J 250 kg is using up almost as much energy as a person uses up in a day all in a matter of seconds...

Now lets look at a more realistic lift for us... How about a 100kg C+J. This is about 1000 calories. Still, a lot of energy.

Im starting to think now... oly lifting could easily be used for weight loss assuming you know the technique and have the strength.

To be honest, these numbers look too good to be true. And in science, when something looks to good, its probably is. Can someone else look over my work? Im pretty confident with my abilities but still... thats a lot of energy in a short amount of time.

Ben Moore
01-11-2008, 12:46 PM
You're reasoning, if I am following you, I would think is a bit skewed having not brought into the equation the weight and body composition of the lifter. Don't get me wrong, I would have no idea how to implement those pieces of information into your equation, LOL.

Definitely interesting though!

Bohizzle
01-11-2008, 12:48 PM
This guy that u made up has arms that are like 5 ft long lol. He can touch an NBA rim standing flat footed at only 6ft tall. The numbers do seem a little too good to be true, but weightlifting absolutely does burn a lot of calories.

Andrew

Ben Moore
01-11-2008, 12:53 PM
I think he meant 10' instead of 10m, LOL

Bohizzle
01-11-2008, 12:59 PM
yeah I figured as much, but my comment still stands lol

deeder
01-11-2008, 01:01 PM
You're oversimplifying things way too much...

You're not lifting it like a crane would straight up. All the leverages your body provides would significantly reduce the amount of energy required.

You're taking an EXTREMELY complex movement and turning it into a straight line. If you can figure out a physics equation that describes this movement chances are you'll be getting calls from some top robotics companies.

BFGUITAR
01-11-2008, 01:31 PM
Yes sorry, 10 feet which is 3 meters.

Deeder I think I may be, but the fact is to move an object from point A to B must require that much energy. How you do it doesnt change that. Unless that fact is wrong, I dont see any evident flaws despite my caution.

I look at these complex movements as the most efficient way to get weight over your head. Any other lift will cause you to use more energy than this. Still, th snatch and C+J arent 100 efficient, but they are the most efficient, closest to the true value.

Body composition is irrelevant, you need that much energy to move that much weight that height on the planet earth.

CleverName
01-11-2008, 03:34 PM
Olympic lifts are definitely good if you're looking to lose weight/burn calories. They will make you sweat and work hard. :D :nod: I think T-Nation had an article that said that it's like the cardio version of weight lifting! Or something.

deeder
01-11-2008, 03:45 PM
Yes sorry, 10 feet which is 3 meters.

Deeder I think I may be, but the fact is to move an object from point A to B must require that much energy. How you do it doesnt change that. Unless that fact is wrong, I dont see any evident flaws despite my caution.

I look at these complex movements as the most efficient way to get weight over your head. Any other lift will cause you to use more energy than this. Still, th snatch and C+J arent 100 efficient, but they are the most efficient, closest to the true value.

Body composition is irrelevant, you need that much energy to move that much weight that height on the planet earth.

Imagine that I've got a bar loaded to 100kg and I pull it 1 foot off the ground. Now imagine I've got a 10 foot long stick and I use that as a lever to lift it a foot off the ground.

Now, you may be right that you've exerted the same amount of energy on the object, but you'll expend more lifting it without the lever.

RedSpikeyThing
01-11-2008, 04:58 PM
I hate to piss on your parade, but the calorie used on food labels is actually a kilocalorie.

Also, deeder is right too

Invain
01-11-2008, 05:29 PM
Food calories are not normal calories, don't forget. We eat kcal's. There's no way somebody is burning 1000 kcals in one lift.

Edit: Wow, didn't even notice redspikey's response above this.

Averof
01-11-2008, 06:13 PM
ive often wondered how much actual energy each lift costs me...been doing olympic lifting for a bit, and man when u max out on clean and jerk it is taxing...hell same with squatting..when ur pushing that 5th rep and it feels like you're trying to move the earth

these numbers u give sound pretty crazy though..

BFGUITAR
01-11-2008, 06:17 PM
Ok thats explains everything, thanks.
I completely forgot about the kcals.
At least I knew something wasnt right, damn units lol.

Fuzzy
01-11-2008, 10:03 PM
Tabata hangcleans and front squats ftw!!

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