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Averof
01-11-2008, 06:18 PM
couldn't think of another way to phrase it... just got curious about this.. have there been any tests or competitions to see how much someone can support on his back as if he were about to do a back squat but didn't.... just taking it off the rack and not squatting..but standing there with it on your back..

im curious what the numbers would be

Paul Stagg
01-12-2008, 10:37 AM
There is no maximum.

Averof
01-14-2008, 09:01 PM
ya... ok man

Lones Green
01-14-2008, 09:23 PM
walk out with heavy weight until you cant lift it off the pins anymore if you're that curious

andrewnp
01-14-2008, 09:57 PM
it would be hard to find a limit because anything after a certain weight the human brain really just says "this is heavy", you can't tell the difference.

deeder
01-14-2008, 11:09 PM
There is no maximum.


ya... ok man

Well what kind of answer did you really want?!

The limit is 1356.3441lbs. Any more than that and ANY human will snap in half...

There are people squatting over 1200lbs. If you're strong enough there is no limit.

Guido
01-15-2008, 03:38 PM
People have supported thousands of pounds on "back lifts". I believe that the great Paul Anderson holds the all-time record at 6,270 lbs supported on his back. That's like a medium-size SUV. The only theoretical limit would be the point at which the compressional forces cause your bones to break.

Averof
01-15-2008, 04:12 PM
People have supported thousands of pounds on "back lifts". I believe that the great Paul Anderson holds the all-time record at 6,270 lbs supported on his back. That's like a medium-size SUV. The only theoretical limit would be the point at which the compressional forces cause your bones to break.

thanks, thats along the lines of what i was wondering

Hazerboy
01-15-2008, 04:20 PM
Which would vary with bone density (and perhaps some other factors... any other ideas?).

The real question would be HOW dense your bones can become, then how much weight that would support before it snaps (AND how much weight your surrounding muscles would support).

Paul Stagg
01-15-2008, 05:31 PM
There is no maximum.

Find something important to worry about.