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bjohnso
01-17-2008, 11:28 AM
Ladies and gentlemen,

I've always wondered if the nutritional facts on the back of a package of meat pertain to the cooked or uncooked weight. For example, 4oz of chicken breast has 23g of protein. Is that the cooked or uncooked weight? If it's the uncooked weight then I can reasonably assume that I am getting a lot more protein than I have calculated, due to the meat becoming lighter after it is cooked.

Thanks,
bjohnso

Torrok
01-17-2008, 12:19 PM
it changes after cooking???? ~_^

Notorious
01-17-2008, 03:36 PM
Just weigh the whole package of meat and see how many servings it has. If the servings don't add up to the weight of the meat, then it's cooked. I'd assume it's uncooked though.

Outshine
01-17-2008, 04:05 PM
Are you sure it doesn't say right on it? The chicken I buy says something like "Serving Size: 4oz Raw"

The best thing you can do though is get yourself a food scale (they're like $25) and just weigh it on your own (cooked or raw) then look up that specific serving size on some calorie counting site (I like http://www.acaloriecounter.com).

Then I cook a bunch of chicken twice a week, weigh it out and divide it up into pretty little daily servings with the exact calories/protein I need it to have, and eat throughout the week.

bjohnso
01-19-2008, 03:46 PM
I'm pretty sure it doesn't say on the package if it's cooked or raw. I'll have to run an experiment sometime. Thanks guys.

bjohnso
02-09-2008, 03:50 PM
Finally got around to checking this. My chicken that I just grilled lost about 20% of it's weight from start to finish. Oh well, I don't care that much about it.

joelhall
02-10-2008, 05:02 AM
thats the protein in the tissue itself. although aminos will undergo changes under heat, youre not going to lose large quantities of protein by cooking.

most of the weight lost, almost all in fact, will be water and other fluids evaporating.

remember chickens are animals, that measurement is the protein which makes up its muscle:)

Slim Schaedle
02-10-2008, 09:20 AM
thats the protein in the tissue itself. although aminos will undergo changes under heat, youre not going to lose large quantities of protein by cooking.

most of the weight lost, almost all in fact, will be water and other fluids evaporating.

remember chickens are animals, that measurement is the protein which makes up its muscle:)

He's talking about the weight of the piece if meat prior to, and after cooking.

Not how much protein is in there or other properties of the meat.

Example: Does the 4oz watery precooked meat have 23 g protein, or does the much dryer meat weighed at 4oz after cooking have 23g protein?

(I go by the precooked weight)


And how does an amino acid change when heat is applied?

bjohnso
02-10-2008, 11:26 AM
He's talking about the weight of the piece if meat prior to, and after cooking.

Not how much protein is in there or other properties of the meat.

Example: Does the 4oz watery precooked meat have 23 g protein, or does the much dryer meat weighed at 4oz after cooking have 23g protein?

(I go by the precooked weight)


And how does an amino acid change when heat is applied?

So pre-cooked weight it is then?

bjohnso
02-10-2008, 11:28 AM
thats the protein in the tissue itself. although aminos will undergo changes under heat, youre not going to lose large quantities of protein by cooking.

most of the weight lost, almost all in fact, will be water and other fluids evaporating.

remember chickens are animals, that measurement is the protein which makes up its muscle:)

Yeah, that's what I mean - I know it's not burning up the protein, I just wanted to know what...well, exactly what Slim said. His example is worded a lot better than my original question.

joelhall
02-10-2008, 11:57 AM
its not necessarily 'burning up' the protein. certain aminos which are fragile will break into simpler ones but generally there will not be much difference in the total amount of protein before and after (unless you have it very well done of course and scorch it). im not an expert on this so couldnt tell you which ones will change or to what degree, but the packaging will mean the raw weight.

Slim Schaedle
02-10-2008, 01:04 PM
its not necessarily 'burning up' the protein. certain aminos which are fragile will break into simpler ones but generally there will not be much difference in the total amount of protein before and after (unless you have it very well done of course and scorch it). im not an expert on this so couldnt tell you which ones will change or to what degree, but the packaging will mean the raw weight.

Give me an example of an amino acid that changes into another due to heat.

Which aminos are fragile?

joelhall
02-10-2008, 01:59 PM
by fragile i should probably have said more sensitive to heat. glutamine and glutamic acid are well known to degrade down when heated, but some are more likely to do so than others. sodium caseinate was shown to become lower in protein efficiency ration when heated in tests due to amino changes and breakdown, and breakdown of available lysine and methionine. though some other aminos do not decrease like this when heated. interstingly when some of these tests are done the amount of total proteins doesnt decrease by the same amount as in the degredation of free aminos, so the assumption is they go through a heat induced mutation, or lose bonds with one part of there chain. unfortunately im not a chemist so dont know exactly which changes occur in all the aminos. sorry:)

BBB
02-10-2008, 04:14 PM
4 oz raw = 3 oz cooked (usually)

So, 23 grams in 4oz raw and 23 grams in 3oz cooked.

bjohnso
02-10-2008, 05:08 PM
Ah, **** it! I'll just start eating it raw! Cooking is a pain in the ass anyway!


4 oz raw = 3 oz cooked (usually)

So, 23 grams in 4oz raw and 23 grams in 3oz cooked.

Thanks. I guess I've been getting quite a bit more protein than I've been figuring (not that that's a bad thing).