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keltoids
02-05-2008, 09:53 AM
i am confused when you guys say in order to lose weight you need to burn more calories than you consume. do you mean in a day?

cuz lets say i eat around 2000 calories. i dont understand how im supposed to go to the gym and burn 2100 calories off my body. am i misunderstanding something? i lift weights and do cardio, but according to fitday.com i burn 700-900 calories everytime i go to the gym.

as far as diet i eat 6-8 small meals/snacks a day. foods consisting of mixed veggies, egg whites, canned tuna, chicken breast, salads, cashew nuts, peanuts, oats, protein bars/shakes, peanut butter, pasta.

mikey4402
02-05-2008, 11:05 AM
you burn calories all day long, not just when your at the gym

Michigan
02-05-2008, 05:31 PM
well look at it this way. You should take in 500 more calories over maintenance if you want to bulk up. So if you want to lose weight. your going to want to take in less than what your maintenance level is.

Bicster
02-05-2008, 06:57 PM
i am confused when you guys say in order to lose weight you need to burn more calories than you consume. do you mean in a day?

thursdays

Michigan
02-06-2008, 06:59 PM
nice answer bicster

Slim Schaedle
02-06-2008, 08:26 PM
The overall fat loss happens on a broad spectrum.

Every day your body is disassembling triglycerides into fatty acids (and glycerol) and then those get oxidized (hopefully), etc etc.

Meanwhile, you might be storing more fatty acids in adipose cells, while your body is producing larger muscle cells from amino acids.

Or, the complete opposite of these can happen, all within the same day or even the same time.

So what's my point? Control your diet on a large scale and you control the broad spectrum of your body's processes.


I utilized a diet in which I overate by thousands of calories on a few days. The overall daily average (out of the week) was still 500cals below maintenance...and I lost fat.


As far as eating more than you take in.... your body uses a crap load of calories just to survive and run itself. Trying to burn off the exact amount you eat is so counterproductive I wouldn't know where to start.


Actually, yes I do. I will start with those who have eating disorders, eat next to nothing, exercise way more than any of us, and puke up their food.

And where did that get them?

T FLEX
02-06-2008, 08:34 PM
As was mentioned you burn calories all day long. As a matter of fact if you just sat in a chair all day long you would still burn calories. Its called Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR), the number of calories your body burns before physical activity generally speaking. On top of this you obviously burn calories when engaged in physical activity throughout the day. When you add all these calories together it represents whats called maintenance calories or the number of calories one must consume in a day to maintain a certain weight. Consume more calories in a day than that and you'll gain weight and consume less calories in a day and you will lose weight. This of course is assuming you're being consistent day to day.

Here is one place you can go to figure your BMR/Maintenance caloric needs to figure out how many calories you should be consuming everyday to meet your needs. It's probably not 100% accurate but will give you a very good idea. Hopefully this helps :hello:

ehow.com/how_2110531_figure-out-daily-calorie-needs.html

(I don't have enough posts to post a direct link but you can copy and past the URL above to get you there)

Bako Lifter
02-06-2008, 08:46 PM
The overall fat loss happens on a broad spectrum.

Every day your body is disassembling triglycerides into fatty acids (and glycerol) and then those get oxidized (hopefully), etc etc.

Meanwhile, you might be storing more fatty acids in adipose cells, while your body is producing larger muscle cells from amino acids.

So what's my point? Control your diet on a large scale and you control the broad spectrum of your body's processes.


:fart:

joelhall
02-10-2008, 05:41 AM
the diets important too. if you cut out refined sugars in food and anything with additives, then you wont get as high insulin spikes, cutting the amount of energy stored as fat... keeping up eating regularly doesnt allow your body to assume impending famine - which will cause it again to store fat. eating quickly digestible foods will use up energy and theyll be used more readily.

and remember the brain uses alot of energy, being cold makes you shiver and uses more up, heavier people burn more at rest, people who eat more often use more in digestion, spicy food oxidises more fat in the body supposedly, etc etc. alot of factors, but aerobic activity is a good way of using up fat stores. just watch out for crap foods;)

Slim Schaedle
02-10-2008, 09:10 AM
the diets important too. if you cut out refined sugars in food and anything with additives, then you wont get as high insulin spikes, cutting the amount of energy stored as fat... keeping up eating regularly doesnt allow your body to assume impending famine - which will cause it again to store fat. eating quickly digestible foods will use up energy and theyll be used more readily.

and remember the brain uses alot of energy, being cold makes you shiver and uses more up, heavier people burn more at rest, people who eat more often use more in digestion, spicy food oxidises more fat in the body supposedly, etc etc. alot of factors, but aerobic activity is a good way of using up fat stores. just watch out for crap foods;)

How do additives contribute to insulin release, or more specifically, "spike"?

How does eating quickly digestiible foods use up energy? And how are they used more readily?

How long can the space between meals be to prevent the body from sensing starvation?

joelhall
02-10-2008, 12:48 PM
additives arent just added to preserve foods but to make them more palatable and to feed the masses and of course keep costs as low as possible. extra fats salt and sugars as well as acids and fillers and buffers are used. salt fat and refined sugars are used in most processed foods as additives for this reason.

this is of course good for people who go long periods between meals and dont have as many calories as us, as it keeps them ticking, stops them starving and gives the body energy for all its important processes. thats the reason we have that reaction inside us, it keeps us alive, and allows us to store energy for these processes when food may be scarce (after all its been starving all day and doesnt know when it will be fed again, so it does this to survive longer until the next meal). the problem is of course athletes tend not to just have a quick breakfast and a big evening meal with a small snack halfway through the working day. this of course is no good to us so we should avoid it (its also why alot of people get obese and suffer adult-onset diabetes eating junk all the time).

the problem isnt various chemicals themselves but what they are included with, and almost all processed foods will have these added to some degree.

easily digestable foods obviously break down to constituent parts quicker, move along the digestive tract and enter the blood stream quicker. this keeps a supply of nutrients moving through the body easier, (this is tied in with the last point) so the body naturally ups its metabolic rate. as there is a steady supply of nutrients in the blood it has no need to slow down and store them, unless you are totally sedentary or have any problem affecting your metabolism (thyroid problems, etc). this doesnt actually 'use up' any more energy than eating the large meals of the same amount (maybe even a little less) but it doesnt divert as much blood to the digestive tract so reduces lethargy and bloating and has knock on effects like making the person more energetic and improving mood. what is does do is get everything chugging along a little quicker. this is just keeping the bmr at a nice steady pace. this means of course that a healthy person will be using up energy more efficiently, as well as other processes like cellular protein turnover, cell production, and so on.

space between meals is quite individual to the person. its based on the metabolic rate, which is largely influenced by how heavy the person is, how often they are used to eating along with their average caloric intake. youll have seen this effect if you go all day without food then eat. youll feel more lethargic than usual after eating as your body wants to store energy 'just in case'. and because it will want more glycogen for the liver and muscle cells which it usually has plenty of, but has been depleted. obviously fat is merely its reserve system of energy in times of need. any drastic shifts in caloric intake or use or indeed timing have this knock on effect on the bodys energy supplies, though clearly you wont notice it much if its just on the odd occaision.

so unfortunately there is no hard and fast rule to the last question, though generally 2 - 2 1/2 hours is ok, but of course 'grazing' between meals can help too. just be careful not to gorge until ready to pop - the bloating that follows will set you back pretty quick.

Slim Schaedle
02-10-2008, 01:03 PM
So you just said water increases insulin output?

joelhall
02-10-2008, 02:16 PM
oh bugger it seems i did:omg:

ill edit that i think heh heh... ive not really any idea where i was going with that.:confused:
thanks for picking up on that slim