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View Full Version : A "problem" with DE box squats



BFGUITAR
02-20-2008, 10:52 AM
This is actually a good problem to have :D

I find that when I explode upwards with 55% of my max from the box squat, the bar flies up as well. This never really happened until recently (learning how to explode took a bit of time). I can see how chains might help this problem, but if the weight is flying off my back, is that a sign to up the weight even if it is half of my rep max?

Travis Bell
02-20-2008, 10:58 AM
maybe for the last couple sets yes, but you want to have weight moving very quickly, thats kinda the point. Too many people put too much weight on the bar on DE day because they don't feel they are working hard enough

RickTheDestroyer
02-20-2008, 10:58 AM
Chains or bands will help keep it on your back a bit, but you'll probably keep throwing the bar up anyway. If your bar speed stays good, you can probably add some weight, but I'd be inclined to try chains first.

BFGUITAR
02-20-2008, 11:03 AM
Chains or bands will help keep it on your back a bit, but you'll probably keep throwing the bar up anyway. If your bar speed stays good, you can probably add some weight, but I'd be inclined to try chains first.

Just as I thought, but doesn't it seem kind of odd that a person who can't even squat 300 is already resorting to chains/bands? I guess it will up my progress but I can see the other argument that if I cant squat 300 there are other problems aside from strength. In my mind I have always seen a 300 pounds squat to be an outcome of technique rather than strength.

RickTheDestroyer
02-20-2008, 11:27 AM
For most people, 300 won't happen without both technique and some strength. I'd go with chains before bands, and honestly I don't think they're a bad idea even early on. I'm certainly no authority, but chains have definitely helped me get stronger. I wouldn't think of it as resorting to chains but rather as an attempt to force you to keep working through the easier part of the motion.
Truthfully, I'm not convinced that speed work is necessary early in the game. If you're going to stick with speed squats, more bar weight might be your best first step.

WillKuenzel
02-20-2008, 11:29 AM
Another issue may be that you're not staying tight through the traps and shoulders. If the bar is bouncing around, you're not tight enough. I've done jump squats with 95lbs and 135lbs but the bar never leaves my shoulders. You'll find that if your speed stays good and the weights get heavier, you'll be in situation where you can hurt yourself if you don't stay tight.

Sensei
02-20-2008, 11:35 AM
I haven't followed WS in a while, but Dave used to tell raw lifters to bump up the %s a tad on DE day.

drew
02-21-2008, 08:28 AM
If the bar is moving around, you're not controlling the weight. Get tighter, lock the bar in better.

Travis Bell
02-21-2008, 09:18 AM
yeah I guess I misunderstood your first post, if the bar is actually comming off your back, thats bad. Stay tight and don't fling your hips forward, bring them forward. Also I would add chains in and bands. Its good to learn how to use them now, just make sure you have someone watching you who can critique your form, or video your workout and post it

HP666
02-21-2008, 06:00 PM
yeah I guess I misunderstood your first post, if the bar is actually comming off your back, thats bad. Stay tight and don't fling your hips forward, bring them forward. Also I would add chains in and bands. Its good to learn how to use them now, just make sure you have someone watching you who can critique your form, or video your workout and post it

Ditto all that. Chains and bands are a tool to help you get stronger/lift better. Whether you're trying to make the jump from a 275lb squat to a 300lb squat or a 775lb squat to an 800lb squat, the principals are the same.

BFGUITAR
02-21-2008, 06:29 PM
Ditto all that. Chains and bands are a tool to help you get stronger/lift better. Whether you're trying to make the jump from a 275lb squat to a 300lb squat or a 775lb squat to an 800lb squat, the principals are the same.

The principles are the same, but a lifter squatting 755 pounds can be assumed to have pretty good technique while a person squatting 275 probably doesn't in comparison.

Fuzzy
02-21-2008, 06:38 PM
Learn how to recatch with the legs, it aint bad sto send the bar flying, just catch it properly by dipping back down a bit.

I have video I need to upload of me squatting 308 for sets of 5 and the bar actually gets about 3-4" off my traps.

The reciving concept is much the same as O lifter drop-catching bars when doing overhead stuff.

RhodeHouse
02-21-2008, 07:54 PM
Hold the bar in place. Letting it bounce will kill your spine.

Travis Bell
02-21-2008, 09:48 PM
yeah it will. thats the last thing you want it to do. It teaches you a bad habit. Might get away with it at 200 or 300lbs but once you get to 500, 600, or 700lbs that nice little bounce will fold you in half and send you to the chiro in a hurry

PriestCometh
02-22-2008, 11:41 AM
I would use chains or bands with the bar weight.

I would go 50% bar weight week 1, then week 2 55%, week3 60%, week 4 65%, then deload week five and start all over again.

Thats what I do.

HP666
02-22-2008, 03:38 PM
The principles are the same, but a lifter squatting 755 pounds can be assumed to have pretty good technique while a person squatting 275 probably doesn't in comparison.

Maybe, maybe not. The lifter may be in the 123lb class. Besides that, I know some beginners with great technique. But now we're splitting hairs. It really depends on how you're taught. If you have someone that knows what they're doing to teach you, well, that makes an IMMENSE difference than trying to teach yourself. I'm a perfect example. I've been weight training for 20 years. It wasn't until two months ago or so that I decided I wanted to be dead serious about powerlifting, so I went and found myself a good coach, etc. Before having a coach I always worked out on my own, in a "fitness center". When I squatted I was alone and the most I would do was 315 for reps. Once I was taught the proper technique it made a world of difference. One of the many lessons I've learned is how much mental focus it takes to lift heavy weight like this. Obviously we all now about the grueling heavy training, but the mental aspect plays such a big part; especially for a beginner. And that's all part of technique.
After all that rambling the point I'm trying to make is you should find someone to help you. Not online but in person. You can watch a thousand videos and listen to people who know what they're talking about tell you what to do; and that will help to a degree, but there is no substitute for hands on training.