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View Full Version : Does a minor in college actually MEAN anything?



Altephor
03-05-2008, 09:43 PM
I have a math minor right now, but am seriously considering not completing it. I am a graduating senior and was pretty much forced to take a math class that I am not enjoying and struggling due to a combination of the terrible professor, terrible book, and a general lack of experience with the type of math (it's statistics and my math background is primarily calculus). It was the only math class offered that didn't require prereqs that I hadn't taken, so if I wanted to complete my minor I essentially HAD to take it.

I don't know what happens if I were to drop it though. I assume it just means I don't get a minor and still graduate with my B.S. in Chemistry. Also, if I dropped it would put me below 12 credits, which is the cut off for full-time and part-time student. I'm not sure how that would effect me mid semester since I'm already housed on campus with a full time mealplan.

BFGUITAR
03-05-2008, 11:26 PM
Glad to see someone else getting a B.S. in chemistry!

If your doing poorly, drop it before it hurts you. If it's too late stick with it!

Tofer
03-05-2008, 11:26 PM
What kind of Statistics? Basic Statistical Analysis 1? Having a working knowledge of statistics is very helpful in any scientific work you may be doing in the future. My dad (PhD in Biochemistry) said he regrets not having any background in statistics because he has to depend on other people to do some of the work that he could easily do himself, had he taken a stats class or two.

So yeah, I would stick it out. Do you know what you're going to do with your Chemistry degree yet? Just throwing this out there, but if you ever decided to do something like teaching, you would need to have a teachable minor and Math would be perfect because High School math teachers are very hard to come by.

Bicster
03-06-2008, 05:48 AM
minors mean next to nothing.

BilltheButcher
03-06-2008, 06:26 AM
I'd talk to your advisor, but college is a 4 year vacation before you start to actually get educated.

zen
03-06-2008, 06:39 AM
minors mean next to nothing.

Yeah, I tend to agree.
I got a minor in psych, and it's not really related to my major, so it's worthless.
I think the only time a minor helps is when you put out your resume, particularly early on when you don't have a lot of job-related experience, and you can identify a minor that helps promote your broad disciplines.
I mean, if you are in business management, and you have a minor in organizational psych I think that helps. If you are into finance and you have a minor in microeconomics er something, that prolly helps. If have a sports medicine degree and minored in biology or something like that, it probably helps.
But if you majored in biochem and minored in history.... not so much.

killxswitch
03-06-2008, 08:16 AM
I have a minor in journalism. It contributes absolutely nothing to my life.

Altephor
03-06-2008, 08:26 AM
What kind of Statistics? Basic Statistical Analysis 1? Having a working knowledge of statistics is very helpful in any scientific work you may be doing in the future. My dad (PhD in Biochemistry) said he regrets not having any background in statistics because he has to depend on other people to do some of the work that he could easily do himself, had he taken a stats class or two.

So yeah, I would stick it out. Do you know what you're going to do with your Chemistry degree yet? Just throwing this out there, but if you ever decided to do something like teaching, you would need to have a teachable minor and Math would be perfect because High School math teachers are very hard to come by.

It's Data Analysis.. which would certainly help me in my field IF I was actually learning anything. I plan to go into forensic science, so yes it would help quite a bit, but like I said it's going to hurt more than help if I do terribly (or possibly even fail) the class.

jAy_Dub
03-06-2008, 10:17 AM
I'd talk to your advisor, but college is a 4 year vacation before you start to actually get educated.

Thats really depressing to hear. My college life feels nothing like a vacation at all.

galileo
03-06-2008, 10:21 AM
Professionally no, but personally maybe.

Commute
03-06-2008, 10:26 AM
Can you take it pass/fail? A D is pass :)

I had a minor that is worhtless and for that fact my major is worthless as I am a consultant now and and engineer by degree. I would agree with the 4 year vacation theory.

BG5150
03-06-2008, 10:31 AM
Minors are a good thing to boost a resume. If they are somewhat related to your major field of study, they may be something to distinguish you from another candidate for a job. If you are ever to do grad work, some of the minor discipline might give you a leg up on the material awaiting you.

AKMass
03-06-2008, 11:28 AM
Agree big time on the 4 year vacation thing. Minors are worthless...I think even Bachelors degrees are highly over-valued by society.

BilltheButcher
03-06-2008, 11:48 AM
Thats really depressing to hear. My college life feels nothing like a vacation at all.

Then your in big trouble when you enter the real world and have to work. In college you have one thing to do, get decent grades and if you are having trouble then you need a different major b/c the field isn't going to get any easier once you start doing it for a living. Granted I am talking undergrad, not things like medical school or Harvard law school or something.

BBB
03-06-2008, 12:01 PM
LMAO - when I read the title of this thread I thought to myself, it does if it's in math.

WBBIRL
03-06-2008, 12:19 PM
I'll have a minor in math when I'm done, without really even trying. My computer science degree requires SO much math that I'll be one credit short of getting it, so I'll pick up something stupid (as CS requires 3 cals, a stats, and a martix/line theory class) and have the degree for an extra $300. I don't know if I ever plan to finish it, but if the situation ever proved to be worth while I'd have a good start.

BFGUITAR
03-06-2008, 02:00 PM
Then your in big trouble when you enter the real world and have to work. In college you have one thing to do, get decent grades and if you are having trouble then you need a different major b/c the field isn't going to get any easier once you start doing it for a living. Granted I am talking undergrad, not things like medical school or Harvard law school or something.

Working in a job is different than school like you said. But who's to say that real work may be easier than "getting the mark"?

Altephor
03-06-2008, 02:39 PM
I'll have a minor in math when I'm done, without really even trying. My computer science degree requires SO much math that I'll be one credit short of getting it, so I'll pick up something stupid (as CS requires 3 cals, a stats, and a martix/line theory class) and have the degree for an extra $300. I don't know if I ever plan to finish it, but if the situation ever proved to be worth while I'd have a good start.

That's exactly why I decided on it. I was already 3 math classes towards the minor for my B.S. in Chem, so I figured hey why not. But now this one is proving to be ridiculous.

I spoke with other people in the class and they are all also doing horribly. The professor has a terrible reputation of having almost entire classes just fail.. no curve. I spoke with my advisor and she suggested to try to get out and into another math class if I wanted to preserve the minor, but it's so far in the semester it might not be possible.

My other option is to take it Pass/No Pass, at which point I would not get the minor (can't take a class P/NP if it's required for a major or minor), but if I got a NP it wouldn't effect my GPA. The problem with this is that I have no idea how he does final grades and if he does in fact curve, or how much he curves. So if I switch to P/NP, and then end up with a C.. then I get a pass but still lose the minor making all my other math work effectively useless (I say effectively because obviously I learned a lot in those classes but don't have anything specific to distinguish it).

CrazyK
03-06-2008, 02:45 PM
I'd talk to your advisor, but college is a 4 year vacation before you start to actually get educated.Not if you major in something like Accounting or Engineering.

jAy_Dub
03-06-2008, 03:48 PM
Then your in big trouble when you enter the real world and have to work. In college you have one thing to do, get decent grades and if you are having trouble then you need a different major b/c the field isn't going to get any easier once you start doing it for a living. Granted I am talking undergrad, not things like medical school or Harvard law school or something.

Hmm, I better start being more appreciative and taking more advantage of my current situation then huh?

Idk, I see myself being happier in a stable financial situation instead of constantly being broke and only getting myself in a deeper hole of debt. I also would like to think (correct me if I have it wrong) that I could go to work, get done what I needed to, and then go home to relax/lift or whatever it is I feel like doing. Right now its go to class for the day, and then come home and have to worry about class/assignments/projects even more. Until the weekend comes, it seems like I don't have any free time. Depending on whats due the next week also determines how much free time I actually have on the weekends as well. Isn't there a better separation of work and private life then there is with school and private life/free time? I sure hope so.

j8715
03-06-2008, 03:54 PM
they don't do anything. . . nothing, not boost your resume. nothing.

I have one because it was almost zero extra work, i had to fill out some paperwork to substitute some classes.

BilltheButcher
03-06-2008, 07:03 PM
Hmm, I better start being more appreciative and taking more advantage of my current situation then huh?

Idk, I see myself being happier in a stable financial situation instead of constantly being broke and only getting myself in a deeper hole of debt. I also would like to think (correct me if I have it wrong) that I could go to work, get done what I needed to, and then go home to relax/lift or whatever it is I feel like doing. Right now its go to class for the day, and then come home and have to worry about class/assignments/projects even more. Until the weekend comes, it seems like I don't have any free time. Depending on whats due the next week also determines how much free time I actually have on the weekends as well. Isn't there a better separation of work and private life then there is with school and private life/free time? I sure hope so.

It appears you are in college and haven't been in the working world. I see all these college guys on here, complaining about their class load and I remember back when I was in undergrad doing my BioChem degree and even my CIS Masters (working 50 hrs a week) and I look at running my business and there is no comparison. The stress of keeping a business running, making sure your employees are happy, making sure you are making payroll, making sure you are making the right business decisions is a lot more tough then going to class, learning and studying to make grades because the financial lives of so many families is dependent on you. And the funny thing is most of the degrees out there don't even prepare you for the real world, at least the business degrees.

Also your not married, don't have kids and only have one responsibility which is do good in school. So no you won't have more free time once your in the working world, married, have kids and tons of new responsibilities.

cphafner
03-06-2008, 07:05 PM
Does a major mean anything? I work on Wall Street and tons of people in my office studied something other than business.

Bicster
03-06-2008, 07:25 PM
Does a major mean anything? I work on Wall Street and tons of people in my office studied something other than business.

you need to declare a major in order to get a degree, which i assume the majority of the people you work with on wall street have. so the answer is yes, majors mean something.

jAy_Dub
03-06-2008, 07:32 PM
It appears you are in college and haven't been in the working world. I see all these college guys on here, complaining about their class load and I remember back when I was in undergrad doing my BioChem degree and even my CIS Masters (working 50 hrs a week) and I look at running my business and there is no comparison. The stress of keeping a business running, making sure your employees are happy, making sure you are making payroll, making sure you are making the right business decisions is a lot more tough then going to class, learning and studying to make grades because the financial lives of so many families is dependent on you. And the funny thing is most of the degrees out there don't even prepare you for the real world, at least the business degrees.

Also your not married, don't have kids and only have one responsibility which is do good in school. So no you won't have more free time once your in the working world, married, have kids and tons of new responsibilities.

Ok I completely understand the owning your own business thing. My dad owned his own construction company and that took up ALL of his time. Watching and learning from him, I promised myself I would never put myself in a working situation similar to my father. He had no free time, ever. He was constantly setting up new jobs, making invoices, buying materials, etc, all after he had spend 10 hours at the job site. Definitely not my thing.

I'd rather work for a company where I can go to work, get what I need to done, and go home.

Props to you and all the other entrepreneurs out there.

cphafner
03-06-2008, 07:42 PM
you need to declare a major in order to get a degree, which i assume the majority of the people you work with on wall street have. so the answer is yes, majors mean something.

you missed my point. I know you need to declare a major to graduate. My point was I work with engineering, art history, english, finance, pre-med, etc. Picking a major doesn't totally dictate where you are going to spend your career.

Bicster
03-07-2008, 12:00 PM
i did get your point, i just disagreed with where you were going with it.