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PelleK
03-09-2008, 11:55 AM
So I've been searching this section of the forum for about 10 minutes, didn't find what I was looking for, so I have to ask.

On my cut I eat enough of fat, proteins and carbs, and I'm avoiding sugar. Now, the thing is, I know why I'm eating fats, proteins and carbs, but I don't know exactly why sugar is bad for me. This prolly sounds very stupid, but when u look at the backside of a coce for instance it has like, what, 30 calories? That's nothing, but it's hellalot of sugar in there, which makes me gain weight. Can anyone explain why the body gets fat by eating sugar? And preferably how much sugar is acceptable on a cut?

Thanks :)

whiteman90909
03-09-2008, 12:15 PM
I don't know exactly, but something about how sugar has such a high GI rating which creates an insulin spike and forces your body to convert an unusually high number of calories ingested into body fat.

Built
03-09-2008, 01:41 PM
In a surplus, yes.

If you run a deficit and hit your minimums for protein and fat, you're fine.

azma
03-09-2008, 05:00 PM
Also, it depends on the type of sugar. Fructose is less conveniently metabolized in your liver than glucose. As a result, pound for pound, fructose will contribute more fat gain and less energy (after all, muscle glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose) to your weightlifting self.

According to UCSF endocrinology professor Robert Lustig, "[...] the only organ in your body that can take up fructose is your liver. Glucose, the standard sugar, can be taken up by every organ in the body; only 20% of glucose load ends up at your liver. Let's take 120 calories of glucose -- that's two slices of white bread as an example. Only 24 of those 120 calories will be metabolized by the liver; the rest of it will be metabolized by your muscles, by your brain, by your kidneys, by your heart, et cetera, directly with no interference. Now, let's take 120 calories of orange juice. Same 120 calories, but now 60 of those calories are going to be fructose, because fructose is half of sucrose, and sucrose is what's in orange juice -- so it's going to be all the fructose, that's 60 calories, plus 20% of the glucose, so that's another 12 out of 60. In other words, 72 out of the 120 calories will hit the liver -- three times the substrate as when it was just glucose alone. That bolus of extra substrate to your liver does some very bad things to it."

Make sure you read that twice; there's a lot of information in there.

Now, sucrose is half fructose and half glucose, but starch is 100% glucose. Because of this, starch calories are more useful to your body than sucrose calories are. In addition, starch takes your body more time to break down because it's a big chain of molecules, so your insulin doesn't spike as much after you eat it, leaving you fuller for longer.

Resultantly, if you're going to eat (for example) 500 calories worth of carbohydrates, the most efficient way to do that is by getting those calories from complex carbohydrates, rather than from sugars. However, not eating sugar pretty much sucks, so the goal should be to minimize (or at least reduce) it in your diet, not to eliminate it altogether.

PelleK
03-10-2008, 06:53 AM
Thanks whiteman90909, Built, and azma :)

So, what you say is that when you're eating alot, sugar will help make high number of calories ingested into body fat, because your insulin doesn't spike as much after you eat it, leaving you fuller for longer. And when you're eating below maintanence (proteins, fat and carbs included) the sugar won't make a difference. Carbs from fruits etc do more damage to your liver, while white sugar metabolizes in your whole body, not just the liver. So the key is to eat less sugar, not no sugar at all. Correct?

azma
03-10-2008, 12:48 PM
So, what you say is that when you're eating alot, sugar will help make high number of calories ingested into body fat, because your insulin doesn't spike as much after you eat it, leaving you fuller for longer. And when you're eating below maintanence (proteins, fat and carbs included) the sugar won't make a difference. Carbs from fruits etc do more damage to your liver, while white sugar metabolizes in your whole body, not just the liver. So the key is to eat less sugar, not no sugar at all. Correct?

Hmm....generally correct, with three discrepancies.

1)>> Sugar is a simple carbohydrate. It makes your insulin levels spike, then plummet. Starch is a complex carbohydrate. It doesn't. Starches (and other complex carbohydrates) are better.

2)>> Fructose isn't as useful to your body as glucose. Steer clear of sodas and anything with "high-fructose corn syrup."

3)>> When you're eating below maintenance, make sure that you're getting the right amount of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Like Built said, that's the most important thing. After you have that under control, you can make sure you're not eating too much saturated fat and sugar.

PelleK
03-11-2008, 08:11 AM
allright, thanks m8 :)