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View Full Version : Does your total calorie intake limit the amount you can lift?



Spawn
03-15-2008, 11:01 AM
I sometimes read posts of recommendation on these forums when someone has their bench, squat or deadlift (or any other exercise for that matter) stalling to change their routine to break the plateau or eat more and get bigger.

Eating in caloric surplus will increase your mass (assuming food is at optimum levels for clean muscle gain).

My questions:

1. Will an increase in muscle mass help add weight to the bar?
2. Or even be considered as a limit to how much weight one can lift?
3. I'm just curious what the relationship (if any) is with "eating more" and adding weight to the bar is.

thanks!

DirtyRobot
03-15-2008, 12:00 PM
I sometimes read posts of recommendation on these forums when someone has their bench, squat or deadlift (or any other exercise for that matter) stalling to change their routine to break the plateau or eat more and get bigger.

Eating in caloric surplus will increase your mass (assuming food is at optimum levels for clean muscle gain).

My questions:

1. Will an increase in muscle mass help add weight to the bar?
2. Or even be considered as a limit to how much weight one can lift?
3. I'm just curious what the relationship (if any) is with "eating more" and adding weight to the bar is.



1. Um, yes...?
2. No. More mass, even if it's fat, is said to help.
3. Eating = more mass = more strength = more weight on bar

Were these serious? Look around the gym. Who's lifting more weight? The 110 lb twig or the 220lb guy full of muscle?

Spawn
03-15-2008, 12:55 PM
1. Um, yes...?
2. No. More mass, even if it's fat, is said to help.
3. Eating = more mass = more strength = more weight on bar

Were these serious? Look around the gym. Who's lifting more weight? The 110 lb twig or the 220lb guy full of muscle?actually, yeah i was pretty serious.

so that pretty much answers my question then. if you weigh, say, 200lbs there would be a certain "ceiling" as to how much you could lift depending on your genetics and/or routine, diet, years of training. so, correct me if i'm wrong, that means that you could theoretically lift more if you increased your weight to, say, 220lbs right? But how about the instances where someone can add weight to the bar without necessarily increasing their mass --or have i missed something?

do you have an article about why more mass = more strength. i'd like to understand it on a deeper level.

actually, i'd like to understand the step-by-step process the body goes through that allows it to increase the poundages. coz i know sometimes the weights go up on the bar even if your mass isn't going up.

if anyone's got a link, i'd much appreciate it. thanks!

Unreal
03-15-2008, 03:07 PM
Technique, neural pathways, fiber recruitment and all that can help you lift more without adding more mass, but there is a point where you are going to max that all out and won't be able to move more without more muscle/mass. The easiest way to increase the amount your lifting is to add more mass/muscle. Working on technique can only get you so far.

Spawn
03-15-2008, 09:41 PM
Technique, neural pathways, fiber recruitment and all that can help you lift more without adding more mass, but there is a point where you are going to max that all out and won't be able to move more without more muscle/mass. The easiest way to increase the amount your lifting is to add more mass/muscle. Working on technique can only get you so far.okay, thanks, man. got it ;)

radioheadhead
03-17-2008, 05:01 PM
agree with all the other posters, and the reverse is true as well, at least for me. Toward the end of a cut I'm weak as hell.