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View Full Version : Which Movements for Sticking Points



Kiaran
03-29-2008, 11:36 AM
What's up guys. I'm starting up some Westside style training tomorrow. I've done it before in the past, but only because I thought it sounded different and fun. This time is different for me though. I really want to improve my lifts and my current way of training (classic overload) week after week seems to either leave me too beat up to make gains or just overtrained and burned out. I'm really looking forward to taking full advantage of the Westside style of training: improving my weaknesses, speed and overall strength. I need some help identifying which Westside movements would potentially help me improve my current weaknesses. Below are three vids of some of my better lifts with heavier weight for me, and you should be able to see where things break down. Feel free to critique, comment or whatever; your help is much appreciated.

Where does it appear my form and strength are breaking down in the following three videos? Which movements would/could potentially help me out?

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Thanks for the help, bros.

Paul Stagg
03-29-2008, 12:19 PM
For the bench, you should probably work a little on your form and get stonger all over - your grip looks really close to me, for example.

For the squat, the same applies - you just need to get stronger. You also are squatting to a box that's too high, and I think you need to work more on form.

For the deadlift, your hips come up too fast and too early, so you SLDL the weight up.

For all, form is the first thing to address. You don't really have any weak points holding you back, you just need to bust ass and keep getting stronger on the basics.

Notorious
03-29-2008, 12:27 PM
For the bench, you should probably work a little on your form and get stonger all over - your grip looks really close to me, for example.

For the squat, the same applies - you just need to get stronger. You also are squatting to a box that's too high, and I think you need to work more on form.

For the deadlift, your hips come up too fast and too early, so you SLDL the weight up.

For all, form is the first thing to address. You don't really have any weak points holding you back, you just need to bust ass and keep getting stronger on the basics.

I agree.

Aside from your bench form, it looks like you can use some tricep and speed work, but that goes for almost everyone.

I don't think that squat is even hitting parallel, or at least it is very very close to not hitting it.

For the deadlift, you're straightening your legs almost before you even start the lift.

Kiaran
03-29-2008, 12:49 PM
Awesome, guys. Thanks for the quick replies. So a couple more questions then:

On the Deadlift form: when I pull 315, my legs and back work together, but as the weight gets heavier, as you've seen in the video and mentioned, my butt comes up and it turns into a SLDL. How or what can I do to keep this from happening? What are some good tips to get the back and legs to fire in concert? Do I need to just work with a weight where the form does not breakdown and go from there (i.e. I'm using too heavy of a load)?

On the Squat: that box is 13"; should I maybe try a 10-11" box? I wasn't actually trying to do box squats in that vid, I was more using it to gauge depth.

On the bench: How do you know if your grip is too wide?


Thanks again.

Ryano
03-29-2008, 01:53 PM
My thoughts:

Bench- Grip is only to wide if outside the rings(81cm). The wider, the better. Less range of motion. You look young, so your arch could be better. Better arch, wider grip = less range of motion. It also looks like you aren't getting much leg drive. Drive your heals toward the floor during the press.

Deadlift: I don't deadlift, but some really good deadlifters I know advocate doing rack squats at a medium height to help develope better speed/power off the floor. This may help with the SLDL problem.

thewicked
03-29-2008, 06:56 PM
For the bench, you should probably work a little on your form and get stonger all over - your grip looks really close to me, for example.

For the squat, the same applies - you just need to get stronger. You also are squatting to a box that's too high, and I think you need to work more on form.

For the deadlift, your hips come up too fast and too early, so you SLDL the weight up.

For all, form is the first thing to address. You don't really have any weak points holding you back, you just need to bust ass and keep getting stronger on the basics.

that's a good post right here.. get a good foundation going, start tailoring all you learn to fit your "style" and go from there. Eat right with the proper supplementation like what atlarge provides... sleep..and kick ass in the gym! it'll all come together. It just takes time! :thumbup:

joelhall
04-04-2008, 04:53 AM
definitely form needs improving. on the bench it seems like you have a bit of an imbalance too (right is stronger than the left), and youre shifting too high a weight to improve the form. do some speed work with a lighter weight, maybe knock off 10 or so pounds from the bar to concentrate more on form and throw in some dumbell movements to correct the balance.

i dont agree though that the wider the grip the better. for me using wider grips causes too much of a stretch and makes the bottom of the lift harder. youll know when its too wide because the bottom will feel weak, an hard to bring the bar to touch. you should keep your feet more solid on the floor too, and try to lock down the shoulders more cos you look a bit wobbly on the bench. its paramount to be stable, so youre using the effort on the weight not stabalising.

on the squat it looked like you were leaning forward too much, especially going back up. you must correct this to squat heavy, and dont push your head back so much, it puts strain across the shoulder girdle.

to stop that SLDL when you pull, you need to get stronger in the legs. ditch the box when you squat and focus on form, and building up strength. when you deadlift dont raise up the hips so fast, focus on moving the legs, pushing the floor away with your feet like a squat. keep the shoulders back and lock them and concentrate on the legs pulling it up, dont let the torso move forward. start the lift by trying to pull with just the shoulders and arms before you push off. thatll stop that initial pulling on your shoulders while the hips are coming up. drop the weight a bit and get the form bang on.

joel

Xellarz
04-04-2008, 09:19 AM
Also for bench, try squeezing your shoulderblades together.

noahfor123
04-04-2008, 09:26 AM
You might want to try lowering your bar position on the squat. That is a high bar position right?

Travis Bell
04-04-2008, 09:50 AM
two boards wouldn't kill you either, but everything else has pretty much been covered. Speed work would help out alot

Kiaran
04-06-2008, 01:12 PM
Hey fellas, thanks for all the support and help. I've already begun working on what you all mentioned so we'll see how it goes. I'll definitely give the 2-board a shot on the bench and just keep crankin away at my form. I think I'll pass on the low-bar squats only because when I drop the bar lower on my back, I tend to lean forward even more, which is no good for me. For the deadlifts, yeah, those are very good points. I am hoping the extra rowing I'm doing will help me get my shoulders back a little better and stabalize the bar on takeoff so it doesn't swing out forward and turn into an SLDL like in the video. Just going to take time and lots of work right? Thanks again, bros.