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Altephor
04-16-2008, 08:57 PM
I don't know why or what's wrong with me, but I can not run long distance. I did cross country and track for 3 years in high school, and my times never improved. At all. I just recently started crossfit and I realized I just cannot run. Today's workout was only a combined total of 1.25 miles and even the first 400 meters I was dying. Everyone says well just run more and you'll get better but I don't seem to be. I need suggestions, or maybe even some kind of diagnosis as to why running is such a problem for me.

nhlfan
04-16-2008, 10:15 PM
that's kind of strange. what poops out first? legs, lungs, etc?

Altephor
04-16-2008, 10:29 PM
Lungs, always. My legs are actually quite strong after 3 years of lifting they can go pretty much all day.

I should also say that those times that never improve are also quite slow. I used to do 3.1 miles in about 30-32 minutes. Used to do 1 mile in about 9-10 min.

deeder
04-16-2008, 10:34 PM
Have you considered that you're just in bad shape?

Altephor
04-16-2008, 10:52 PM
Well like I said, I'm not in terrible shape. I've been lifting for 3 years. Which doesn't necessarily help cardiovascular, but I'm no couch potato.

And also like I said, during my 3 year period with track and cross country I never got any better.

deeder
04-16-2008, 11:00 PM
Well like I said, I'm not in terrible shape. I've been lifting for 3 years. Which doesn't necessarily help cardiovascular, but I'm no couch potato.

And also like I said, during my 3 year period with track and cross country I never got any better.

Were you training year-round? Being challenged by a competent coach? There are all sorts of reasons you could have made no progress... I highly doubt however, that you just simply can't run.

Altephor
04-16-2008, 11:11 PM
Were you training year-round? Being challenged by a competent coach? There are all sorts of reasons you could have made no progress... I highly doubt however, that you just simply can't run.

Yes, and yes. Like I said, when I run I literally feel like I cannot breathe. Even after just 400 meters I am gasping for air.

Hazerboy
04-17-2008, 08:03 PM
I feel like no matter how bad your coach/routine/whatever was, if should have improved SOMEHOW from day 1. You might have asthma or something, have you ever seen a doctor about this?

Altephor
04-17-2008, 11:13 PM
I feel like no matter how bad your coach/routine/whatever was, if should have improved SOMEHOW from day 1. You might have asthma or something, have you ever seen a doctor about this?

No not specifically. I don't have any wheezing or whiny breath sounds when I run, it's just like I can't get enough air. Even the 400 meter runs I was doing for crossfit the other day, I felt dizzy and a little faint at the end of them.

deeder
04-17-2008, 11:17 PM
Breathe through a straw for a few minutes. If that's what you feel like when you're running, then you could have asthma. That's about what it feels like... Not all the time obviously, but you could have exercise induced asthma...

I've mostly grown out of it now. Allergies still bring it back a bit but nothing like I had when I was a kid.

nhlfan
04-18-2008, 12:45 AM
I too had asthma when I was younger. Sometimes I'd play a 30 second shift in hockey that I might as well have been holding my breath for, and almost collapse when I got back to the players box.

Get checked out.

Altephor
04-18-2008, 08:05 AM
What kind of doc would I go to, to get that checked out? My GP? Or would it be better to use an ENT or perhaps a physical therapist?

SDS
04-18-2008, 10:02 AM
Probably go to your GP and let him/her decide what type of specialist (if any) needs to be seen.

MillerTime1485
04-27-2008, 10:48 PM
I have a mild asthma case and what you describe sounds like the typical symptoms. I went to my family doctor and asked about it, I got an answer pretty quick I highly recomend you do the same.

ryuage
04-27-2008, 11:18 PM
very weird, but I had severe asthma and chronic bronchitis and trained myself to run marathons...

weak mind?

and im not kidding... seriously... maybe you are psyching yourself out

BigRic
04-28-2008, 04:20 PM
I'd say GP and ask for a referral to get a stress test or VO2 max test done.

Bupp
04-28-2008, 04:36 PM
Is it just running, or can you also not swim/bike/rollerblade/cross country ski etc.

Auburn
04-29-2008, 06:14 AM
Is there any particular reason that you want to run?

I can't do it well either. So, I don't.

Coachmanor
05-02-2008, 09:15 PM
You could have exertional asthma; it is a form of asthma that only presents itself during an abnormal stressor to the cardiovascualr system i.e. running. I would discuss this with a health care provider and see if there is anything you can do. If this, is not your problem then I would suggest lifting with minimal down time between sets for a while in other words go straight to your next lift no wait. It is a great way to work on endurance while working on strength, and you may find that your cardiovascular health improves well enough to run if that is something that is improtant to you, but I would check on your health first.

Altephor
05-11-2008, 02:55 PM
I also have a caved sternum, also know as PE. Which I hear can affect cardiovascular endurance, but I wasn't sure how much.

Invain
05-11-2008, 03:26 PM
I feel ya man. I ran track for 3 years in highscool and had the absolute worst endurance no the team every single year. I was long jumping 20 - 21' and had the fastest 200m dash, but I ran a mile in 10 - 12 minutes. I was known to puke almost every practice from exhaustion. I have no clue why but my endurance has never gotten any better. I realize I'm out of shape right now, but back when I ran track I was about 80 pounds lighter, no reason to be out of shape. Exactly like Altephor described, I never got any better as well, at least in the distance running.

Altephor
05-11-2008, 03:48 PM
I feel ya man. I ran track for 3 years in highscool and had the absolute worst endurance no the team every single year. I was long jumping 20 - 21' and had the fastest 200m dash, but I ran a mile in 10 - 12 minutes. I was known to puke almost every practice from exhaustion. I have no clue why but my endurance has never gotten any better. I realize I'm out of shape right now, but back when I ran track I was about 80 pounds lighter, no reason to be out of shape. Exactly like Altephor described, I never got any better as well, at least in the distance running.

Yes, anything less than 400 m or so I can do no problem, after that I consider it long distance and I'm just dying from exhaustion.

jed
05-11-2008, 04:59 PM
asthma. take it from the people that have it/have experienced it. i have it. i can't usually sprint over 200 meters before i need my inhaler. just go to your normal doc, my normal doc diagnosed mine.

Invain
05-11-2008, 11:01 PM
I really don't know if it's astma in a case like mine though. I've thought about it before, but never gone to the doctor and had it checked out. It's not like I have terrible problems breathing, I just get extremely exhausted. Sure breathing is a little rough when I'm gasping for air after running a lap but I'm not wheezing and stuff.

Szust
05-17-2008, 01:04 AM
Push. Through. It. I had the same problems as a kid. Now I run without a problem. Set your mind up for it. Know that you'll run a lot.

Fuzzy
05-17-2008, 05:18 AM
I wen from being junior national level rower to puffing from putting weight on the bar.

J.C.
05-17-2008, 07:51 AM
Its interesting that someone else has this problem. I simply cannot run either.

Up until I was 14, I just assumed I was really unfit and bad at sport primarily because I couldn't run. Then I started rowing at school and excelled. I was one of the bigger guys in the boat and had excellent stamina.

My cardiovascular system clearly wasn't the problem as we would do hideously long endurance pieces on both the river and the rowing machine but I would still dread every piece of running we had to do as land training.

It became somewhat of a joke in the team, where they'd have to put me at the front so I wouldn't get left behind on runs. At one point, I had the second fastest 5000m time on the rowing machine but the slowest running time out of the top two teams. Clearly that shouldn't happen.

Now at my university, the boat club used to do a 60 minute run every Monday night and I'd still do it and get through it but it was just on pure grit, determination and general physical fitness, rather than any sort of ability at running. I can force myself to run and I can make myself keep going for a fairly long time but it is something that I have never felt to be easy or comfortable. I look sort of weird when running too, so I believe I am fundamentally maladapted to running. I am just lacking the bio-mechanical make-up to run.

OK, there's my story. Bottom line; maybe you're like me, maybe you just run like a ****** and aren't meant for running. You know what, **** it - ride a bike, go swimming, start rowing, whatever, there are other ways of getting fit.

J.C.
05-17-2008, 07:56 AM
Wow, sensitive language filter. I had no idea the first word needed hiding. Can you guess what it was? It begins with R. I wonder what else is filtered... But no, quite agree, swearing ain't big or clever.

schmitty199
05-17-2008, 09:24 AM
Its interesting that someone else has this problem. I simply cannot run either.

Up until I was 14, I just assumed I was really unfit and bad at sport primarily because I couldn't run. Then I started rowing at school and excelled. I was one of the bigger guys in the boat and had excellent stamina.

My cardiovascular system clearly wasn't the problem as we would do hideously long endurance pieces on both the river and the rowing machine but I would still dread every piece of running we had to do as land training.

It became somewhat of a joke in the team, where they'd have to put me at the front so I wouldn't get left behind on runs. At one point, I had the second fastest 5000m time on the rowing machine but the slowest running time out of the top two teams. Clearly that shouldn't happen.

Now at my university, the boat club used to do a 60 minute run every Monday night and I'd still do it and get through it but it was just on pure grit, determination and general physical fitness, rather than any sort of ability at running. I can force myself to run and I can make myself keep going for a fairly long time but it is something that I have never felt to be easy or comfortable. I look sort of weird when running too, so I believe I am fundamentally maladapted to running. I am just lacking the bio-mechanical make-up to run.

OK, there's my story. Bottom line; maybe you're like me, maybe you just run like a ****** and aren't meant for running. You know what, **** it - ride a bike, go swimming, start rowing, whatever, there are other ways of getting fit.

Ever thought of the possibility your arms are in great shape and your legs on completely out of shape?

J.C.
05-17-2008, 11:50 AM
Ever thought of the possibility your arms are in great shape and your legs on completely out of shape?

No. My lower body is in excellent shape. Rowing is mostly from the legs anyway.

There is just something about running that I can't do. Which is odd.

PatheticJoe
05-18-2008, 09:21 AM
My family has a history of poor blood circulation and several members have been diagnosed with circulatory diseases. As a result cardio has never been achievable for me despite trying for very long stretches to improve it. The point of this is we are all different and can have different genetic predispositions that affect us.

Steve24
05-18-2008, 10:33 AM
Just do a little more every week. You'll notice after awhile that you are actually getting better, it just doesn't come in one big surge.

J.C.
05-19-2008, 06:48 AM
You'll find you improve to some degree sure. But the point is, maybe there are just other ways of doing cardio which you might be better suited for. Unless you're obsessed with running, try something else.

the.powerhouse
05-19-2008, 07:24 AM
Monitor your heart rate. Get yourself one of those watches that can measure it. I never used to think I could run long distance, untill I was given one of those watches as a xmas present. Then I realised I was just running at an un-realistic pace. When I started running in an optimal range I found that I was making huge gains in pace, and my heart rate was getting better and better. Now I can ealy run for 90 mins at a good pace.

bas2178
05-19-2008, 10:09 AM
No. My lower body is in excellent shape. Rowing is mostly from the legs anyway.

There is just something about running that I can't do. Which is odd.

But a different part of the legs. Running with good form is going to mainly be triggering on the calves and quads. Rowing is more hips and posterior chain.

A big part of running is the form. If you're laying back and coming down hard on the heels, you're going to have a hard time doing fast paces.

It might be useful to get a form coach to take a look at your running form. There's specific training exercises you can also do force you get more of a forward lean and come down on the middle/front of your feet.

And sprinting form is really, really different from mid to long distance form.

Here's a good intro to running form.

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-238-267-268-8210-0,00.html

J.C.
05-19-2008, 05:08 PM
A big part of running is the form. If you're laying back and coming down hard on the heels, you're going to have a hard time doing fast paces.

It might be useful to get a form coach to take a look at your running form. There's specific training exercises you can also do force you get more of a forward lean and come down on the middle/front of your feet.

And sprinting form is really, really different from mid to long distance form.

Here's a good intro to running form.

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-238-267-268-8210-0,00.html

I'm certain you're right. But how depressing to get someone to teach me how to run! Most people can just do it naturally. Ultimately though I'm not that bothered. I can kick ass on a bike, swimming, whatever. So I'm not a good runner, who cares? I'm still fitter than most.

Altephor
05-19-2008, 10:01 PM
You'll find you improve to some degree sure. But the point is, maybe there are just other ways of doing cardio which you might be better suited for. Unless you're obsessed with running, try something else.

Um, no, there aren't other ways of doing cardio. I can't breathe while running, I can't magically get air just because I'm rowing or stairclimbing instead.

J.C.
05-20-2008, 09:35 AM
Um, no, there aren't other ways of doing cardio. I can't breathe while running, I can't magically get air just because I'm rowing or stairclimbing instead.

OK, well that's different. You have cardiovascular issues, rather than a specific running issue. Get checked out for asthma like other people have said. If nothing, then you're just unfit and need to exercise at a moderate pace for increasingly long times. A heart rate monitor would be useful if you're serious.

Altephor
05-20-2008, 12:08 PM
Well I've always had a pretty high resting heart rate. I haven't taken it in a while but the doctor usually measures it (which isn't a TRUE resting HR, I know) at around 80-90 bpm. But, I have had regular exercise since I was a freshman in high school. I did x-country for 3 years and track for 2 in highschool, then took a year or two off to focus on my senior year of high school and freshman year of college, and then I started lifting. So I don't think I'm terribly out of shape, but maybe I am because I really don't do much cardio.

Now that I do xfit maybe it will get better, but I still think I will get checked out for asthma.

Willie
07-04-2008, 10:11 AM
I feel like no matter how bad your coach/routine/whatever was, if should have improved SOMEHOW from day 1. You might have asthma or something, have you ever seen a doctor about this?

I agree. It could be that you have allergies or some other breathing-related issues that keep you from taking up enough oxygen.

Remember: you can go hard or you can go long, but you can't go hard and long.

Bikkstah
07-05-2008, 04:21 AM
Form

dblockspky
07-08-2008, 08:28 PM
I don't think it's asthma. I have asthma and though it may affect me to an extent it doesn't prevent me from performing well in cardiovascular exercises. You mentioned that lifting has been your primary source of exercise for the last couple years. Though lifting keeps you in shape healthwise, when you hit the track it won't do **** for you. Just keep running, if you start dying when you get to 400m then force yourself to go for as long as you possibly can or do a few miles, 3-4, without stopping. You can also do a few 400m sprints to get your wind up as well and then maybe the psychological aspect of dying at that 400m aspect will go away. It's possible your track coach just sucked in high school. Though, if all the other kids on the team were improving their times each year and you were doing the same stuff as them but saw no improvement then maybe you do have a problem and you should see a doc. I dunno what it's called but there's some way of measuring the rate at which you take in O2 during exercise and they can tell whether or not it's normal or not.