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Rob Luyando
05-24-2008, 07:50 AM
After reading Travis Mash's article on ART Therapy I decided to give it a wirl. I have had a nagging shoulder injury for about 6 months now and I am to busy(stuborn) training to take time off or to train light. After only 3 sessions I feel like a new man no more naggin injury and my flexability is a lot better. Warning ART is not for Pussies. This treatment is painfull but when its over you feel great and its the fastest recovery treatment i have ever exsperienced. I also had work done on both wrist and hands and I am just about 100% now. Hope this information helps anyone with naggin injuries that are to stuborn to adress the problem.

Travis Bell
05-24-2008, 08:51 AM
what exactly do they do Rob? I've been a little curious about this. After benching in my shirt for a couple weeks, behind my left shoulder blade I end up with a baseball sized knot for a week or so. It really hurts. I think its from pulling my shoulder blades together as tight as I do. All I've done for now is just put some heat on it and take ibuprofen occasionally

cphafner
05-24-2008, 08:55 AM
This treatment was just raised to me in my journal. My back has been nagging me for about a year now since I pulled some muscles deadlifting. Might have to give it a shot.

cphafner
05-24-2008, 08:57 AM
what exactly do they do Rob? I've been a little curious about this. After benching in my shirt for a couple weeks, behind my left shoulder blade I end up with a baseball sized knot for a week or so. It really hurts. I think its from pulling my shoulder blades together as tight as I do. All I've done for now is just put some heat on it and take ibuprofen occasionally

This was posted on the main page

http://www.wannabebig.com/article.php?articleid=310

bigbadwolfe
05-24-2008, 10:26 AM
After reading Travis Mash's article on ART Therapy I decided to give it a wirl. I have had a nagging shoulder injury for about 6 months now and I am to busy(stuborn) training to take time off or to train light. After only 3 sessions I feel like a new man no more naggin injury and my flexability is a lot better. Warning ART is not for Pussies. This treatment is painfull but when its over you feel great and its the fastest recovery treatment i have ever exsperienced. I also had work done on both wrist and hands and I am just about 100% now . Hope this information helps anyone with naggin injuries that are to stuborn to adress the problem.

I'm sure Billy is really happy about this :)

Ben Moore
05-24-2008, 02:19 PM
ART and Graston are both great in this aspect. It is soft tissue work that involves active and passive stretching while massaging and digging into the fascia (generally). Graston is basically the same, but with tools.

waynedang
05-24-2008, 06:32 PM
Rob I agree. I have had it done on my elbows and shoulder. I was ready to stop lifting before I had ART done.

Travis Bell
05-24-2008, 07:36 PM
huh, I may have to give this stuff a try. Really nothing ever hurts, just that one knot after benching in my shirt for a couple weeks

SGT ROCK
05-24-2008, 08:01 PM
I was the guinea pig for ART in my area and did it first in 2003 before many powerlifters had tried it, if it doesnt hurt, it wasnt done right! ART really works. Damian has had similar success with it.

Semper Fi

TKisner
05-24-2008, 08:14 PM
About how much do sessions cost?

Ryan Celli
05-24-2008, 09:15 PM
ART works, I've used it. It honestly didn't help my elbow tendonitis, but it greatly improves your flexibility.
Travis, have you tried trigger point therapy? it will get rid of your knot.

Travis Bell
05-24-2008, 09:32 PM
I did, but not for very long. I probably wasn't doing it right though because I did find it a little confusing

Jason Pegg
05-24-2008, 10:25 PM
I did, but not for very long. I probably wasn't doing it right though because I did find it a little confusing

Find a massage therapist to do it. IIRC isnt Amy W. a massage therapist? She could hook you up.

Jason

SGT ROCK
05-25-2008, 07:27 AM
Find a massage therapist to do it. IIRC isnt Amy W. a massage therapist? She could hook you up.

Jason

The average massage therapist is not schooled in advanced ART. If you google ART you can find the licensed people in your area. In my estimation it costs around fifty bucks a session, money well spent if you ask those of us that have done it before. It is NOT the same as a deep tissue massage.

Semper Fi

Fuzzy
05-25-2008, 07:36 AM
Its painful.

What exaclty was done? Trigger points?

Massage is the only reason I can lift as often as I do.

Fuzzy
05-25-2008, 07:44 AM
what exactly do they do Rob? I've been a little curious about this. After benching in my shirt for a couple weeks, behind my left shoulder blade I end up with a baseball sized knot for a week or so. It really hurts. I think its from pulling my shoulder blades together as tight as I do. All I've done for now is just put some heat on it and take ibuprofen occasionally

Make sure your therapist is a big strong guy. ART should be physically demanding, and on a guy like you it would take some serious pressure.

What happens is that the muscle knots up, there are clearly defined gaps between muscles, and with training scar tissue build up causes the formation of big knots. Putting very strong pressure directly on it will make the muslce literally collapse. You will feel it dissapate and all of a sudden all pain is gone.

I highly reccomend it. But if you arent nearly in tears, get a stronger therapist.

Rob Luyando
05-25-2008, 04:27 PM
I'm sure Billy is really happy about this :)


I knew that was coming. LMAO!

DrDudley-Robey
05-28-2008, 08:49 PM
It is also known as Myofascial Release and most good sports chiropractors are trained in it and can do it along with your standard adjustments.

Here is some info on it:

Myofascial Release is a form of bodywork (complementary medicine) which includes, but is not limited to structural assesments (where a formal diagnosis is not necessarily given) and manual massage techniques for stretching the fascia and releasing bonds between fascia, integument, muscles, and bones are mainly applied; with the goal of eliminating pain, increasing range of motion and balancing the body. The fascia is manipulated, directly or indirectly, allowing the connective tissue fibers to reorganize themselves in a more flexible, functional fashion. In addition Myofascial release (note the lower case r), can simply be considered a general manual massage technique any 'lay person' can use to eliminate general fascial restrictions on a living mammalian body.

Fascia is located between the skin and the underlying structure of muscle and bone, it is a seamless web of connective tissue that covers and connects the muscles, organs, and skeletal structures in our body. Muscle and fascia are united forming the myofascia system.

Injuries, stress, inflammation, trauma, and poor posture can cause restriction to fascia. Since fascia is an interconnected web, the restriction or tightness to fascia at a place, with time can spread to other places in the body like a pull in a sweater. The goal of myofascial release is to release fascia restriction and restore its tissue health.

In medical literature, the term myofascial was used by Janet G. Travell M.D. in the 1940s referring to musculoskeletal pain syndromes and trigger points. In 1976 Dr. Travell began using the term "Myofascial Trigger Point" and in 1983 published the famous reference "Myofascial Pain & Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual". Some practitioners use the term "Myofascial Therapy" or "Myofascial Trigger Point Therapy" referring to the treatment of trigger points, this is usually in medical-clinical sense.

Here the term Myofascial Release refers to soft tissue manipulation techniques. It has been loosely used for different manual therapy, soft tissue manipulation work (connective tissue massage, soft tissue mobilization, Rolfing, strain-counterstrain etc). There are two main schools of myofascial release: the direct and indirect method.