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tennisrox4
05-26-2008, 01:49 AM
How much should someone thats NOT training be getting a day?

And also, for someone thats working out, is it like 1 gram of protein to 1 lbs or body weight?

CrazyK
05-26-2008, 03:10 AM
1g/lbs. of bodyweight is plenty if training or not training. No need to overthink protein requirements at 140 lbs., a few eggs, a can of tuna and a cup of cottage cheese and you've met your target.

HipX
05-26-2008, 01:21 PM
If you're working out, I assume you'll want to bulk up past 140 pounds. Aim to have 1 gram of protein per pound of goal weight (if you want to weigh 180, eat 180 grams per day).

CrazyK
05-26-2008, 01:40 PM
If you're working out, I assume you'll want to bulk up past 140 pounds. Aim to have 1 gram of protein per pound of goal weight (if you want to weigh 180, eat 180 grams per day).Overkill imo. Overall calories will bring you to that goal weight, protein should always be about 1g/lbs. of bodyweight at the weight your at now. Just eat, no need to overthink this.

markdk86
05-26-2008, 08:26 PM
More than 1g is not overkill. It does the job, but its far from overkill.

mikey4402
05-26-2008, 08:46 PM
More than 1g is not overkill. It does the job, but its far from overkill.

right../1g is the minimum in my book. Eat 200g of protien

You will need to make sure your eatting enough calories though.

CrazyK
05-26-2008, 11:45 PM
right../1g is the minimum in my book. Eat 200g of protien

You will need to make sure your eatting enough calories though.Any evidence to support this?

markdk86
05-26-2008, 11:58 PM
Any evidence to support this?

Any evidence to support more than 1g being overkill?

CrazyK
05-27-2008, 12:55 AM
Any evidence to support more than 1g being overkill?"a review of the literature leads me to the
conclusion that at the level of protein intake which is
required to achieve N balance (current reference nutrient
intake, or recommended daily amount, 0.75 g protein/kg
body weight per d), the intake of essential amino acids is
adequate to meet the needs of normal function."
http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FPNS%2FPNS60_01%2FS0029665101000039a.pdf&code=9be0d8f72f1399b2799cf8f415584175

1g/lb of bodyweight is more then plenty when trying to reach protein requirements. Even if one were extremely active, training constantly, 1g/lb of bodyweight of protein would still exceed the RDA by 2.5 times.

ProLogic
05-27-2008, 01:27 AM
As much as possible.

markdk86
05-27-2008, 05:07 AM
"a review of the literature leads me to the
conclusion that at the level of protein intake which is
required to achieve N balance (current reference nutrient
intake, or recommended daily amount, 0.75 g protein/kg
body weight per d), the intake of essential amino acids is
adequate to meet the needs of normal function."
http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FPNS%2FPNS60_01%2FS0029665101000039a.pdf&code=9be0d8f72f1399b2799cf8f415584175

1g/lb of bodyweight is more then plenty when trying to reach protein requirements. Even if one were extremely active, training constantly, 1g/lb of bodyweight of protein would still exceed the RDA by 2.5 times.

This doesn't prove that over 1g is overkill, it proves it approximately adequate. More than 1g is fine, especially if bulking.

Nosaj
05-27-2008, 05:32 AM
140-200g protein a day. I'd up the protein/fats and minimize carbs if you're not going to be working out.

CrazyK
05-27-2008, 02:26 PM
This doesn't prove that over 1g is overkill, it proves it approximately adequate. More than 1g is fine, especially if bulking.Adequate meaning that one is in a positive nitrogen balance and has plenty of protein to go around for growth at less then half of 1g/lb of bodyweight. If you want to take in excess protein then that because you like meat and whey and want to consume excess calories that way then go ahead. To claim that 1g/lb of bodyweight is the minimum for growth and/sustainability is however not true.

In other words you not see any extra gains more then you would adding the calories in fats or carbs.

mikey4402
05-27-2008, 07:11 PM
Adequate meaning that one is in a positive nitrogen balance and has plenty of protein to go around for growth at less then half of 1g/lb of bodyweight. If you want to take in excess protein then that because you like meat and whey and want to consume excess calories that way then go ahead. To claim that 1g/lb of bodyweight is the minimum for growth and/sustainability is however not true.

In other words you not see any extra gains more then you would adding the calories in fats or carbs.

There is a diffrence between sustainablity and the nutritional needs of a bodybuilder. Your data doesnt prove anything.

CrazyK
05-27-2008, 10:07 PM
There is a diffrence between sustainablity and the nutritional needs of a bodybuilder. Your data doesnt prove anything.Funny. Unless you can prove that natural bodybuilders need more then 2.5 times the RDA(1g/lb) please do not participate.

markdk86
05-27-2008, 10:44 PM
Funny. Unless you can prove that natural bodybuilders need more then 2.5 times the RDA(1g/lb) please do not participate.

Riggght. We all know how correct the RDA values are for the human body, nevertheless one who exercises. Next thing you know it you will be praising the food pyramid.

The RDA recommends 0.8g of protein/ kg of bodyweight. The RDA also assumes this value for one who has a sedentary lifestyle and adequate calorie intake. These daily protein requirements are modified by two factors: carbohydrate intake and activity level. As total carbohydrate values decline, protein requirements go up.

It has been assumed for years that protein intake at the level of the RDA was adequate for athletes. More recent data suggests that athletes do in fact need more protein than the RDA, in some cases up to 2-3x more (Lemon P). This value changes from the recommended FDA value of 0.8g/kg bodyweight to 1.6-1.8g/kg of bodyweight for those who participate in strength activities.

Yes, nitrogen levels will be affected, but I doubt the OP, a 140lb individual is worried about it, or even trying to be in a state of ketosis, where nitrogen levels are of a high concern.

All information is courtesy of my knowledge, Lyle McDonald, and Lemon P. Is increased dietary protein necessary or beneficial for individuals with a physically active lifestyle? Nutrition Reviews (1996) 54: S169-S175

CrazyK
05-27-2008, 11:04 PM
It has been assumed for years that protein intake at the level of the RDA was adequate for athletes. More recent data suggests that athletes do in fact need more protein than the RDA, in some cases up to 2-3x more (Lemon P). This value changes from the recommended FDA value of 0.8g/kg bodyweight to 1.6-1.8g/kg of bodyweight for those who participate in strength activities. That's just about 1g/lb of bodyweight of protein. A little under actually. Which is what I've been saying all along.

Nosaj
05-28-2008, 12:10 AM
That's just about 1g/lb of bodyweight of protein. A little under actually. Which is what I've been saying all along.

1.6-1.8 > 1

Massively consuming protein definitely meets marginal returns, but to say anything over 1g/lb is a waste is ignorant and incorrect. I would say anything between 1-2g/lb is ideal for most people interested in bodybuilding as a hobby, 1.5g/lb being the ideal starting point for anyone discovering what works best for them.

markdk86
05-28-2008, 07:56 AM
1.6-1.8 > 1

Massively consuming protein definitely meets marginal returns, but to say anything over 1g/lb is a waste is ignorant and incorrect. I would say anything between 1-2g/lb is ideal for most people interested in bodybuilding as a hobby, 1.5g/lb being the ideal starting point for anyone discovering what works best for them.

And 1.6-1.8 is a large difference once we factor in the persons bodyweight. :)

CrazyK
05-28-2008, 11:36 AM
1.6-1.8 > 1

Massively consuming protein definitely meets marginal returns, but to say anything over 1g/lb is a waste is ignorant and incorrect. I would say anything between 1-2g/lb is ideal for most people interested in bodybuilding as a hobby, 1.5g/lb being the ideal starting point for anyone discovering what works best for them.1.6-1.8g/kg not lb of bodyweight. 1 kg=2.2lb. They were using metric measurements in the study which might have confused you.