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Mad Max
06-13-2008, 03:02 PM
So I've decided to incorporate these into my routine after hearing so many great things about them (until this point the only direct hamstring work I did was leg curls:confused:).
Firstly, good mornings. I found that I had to use a seriously light weight (is it lite or light?) of 100lbs in order to feel comfortable going to almost parallel. This weight was very easy though and I whipped it up like it was nothing. I tried 150lbs which was similarly easy, but I just didn't feel comfortable going as low. Is it normal to have to start with such a small weight and work your way up (I can oly squat 315lbs raw and deadlift 450lbs)?

Secondly I was pretty pathetic at GHRs. I used the sit up bench thingy (the flat one with a foot hold at one end), and I found I had to pull my foot forward and hold it in order to perform the lift (i.e. there was a lot tension in my calves juts keeping my foot in place). As expected I couldn't do one unasisted, so I did slow negatives and a failry hefty push to get myself up. The negatives were controlled till about the last quarter of the moveent when I just fell forwrd. I plan on doing GHRs twice a week, but for some reason I can't se myself making progress using the above method, has it worked for you guys?

Thanks in advance

Eric Downey
06-13-2008, 05:04 PM
Good mornings can be dangerous maybe Travis can take a vid of the proper way to do them. We dont do them that offten for me to do it.

SGT ROCK
06-13-2008, 07:16 PM
Any excercise done wrong or too heavy is dangerous, GMs to me are one of the safer movements IF your core is strong. Google it and you will see vids of it. I prefer the high bar version to hammer the lower back. GHR's have blown out my hammies TWICE severely so I dont do them anymore, but they have much merit. GMS are better as an assitance move imo.

Semper Fi

Lones Green
06-13-2008, 08:57 PM
Any excercise done wrong or too heavy is dangerous, GMs to me are one of the safer movements IF your core is strong. Google it and you will see vids of it. I prefer the high bar version to hammer the lower back. GHR's have blown out my hammies TWICE severely so I dont do them anymore, but they have much merit. GMS are better as an assitance move imo.

Semper Fi

i agree! good post.

GM's can be dangerous, but very effective. doing them beltless and not really worry about the weight can build a strong core and posterior. if they help out the deadlift and squat and you can perform them correctly, then do em!

as for GHRs, if you have never done them before, they will be hard also. same as good mornings, but are an excellent assistance exercise. you don't have to do them twice a week either - you can substitue things like reverse hypers, pull throughs, etc. other assistance lifts.

nhlfan
06-13-2008, 10:17 PM
would there be any point to doing reverse band GMs?

Ben Moore
06-13-2008, 10:50 PM
would there be any point to doing reverse band GMs?

I would think it would be hard to keep control with the natural path of the bands.

nhlfan
06-14-2008, 12:46 AM
ah good point

Mad Max
06-14-2008, 04:11 AM
So the main limiting factor with GMs is the strength and stability of the core? Building the core up with GMs allows the awesome strength of the glutes and hams to be transferred to the weight being moved (kind of like making the 'lever' stronger, so it can withstand the rotational forces placed on either end?)?
Can't powerlifting be a bit easier? What's all this cr*p about torque and bands and chains and s***? I mean has no one figured out a way of using star jumps to increase their squat, surely that would make things more accessible for everyone?

Ben Moore
06-14-2008, 07:02 AM
i'm not sure what your question is...

Mad Max
06-14-2008, 08:13 AM
My original questions were how do you build up good mornings and GHRs, considering they are both quite difficult to perform effectively (in my experience anyway)? I was just wondering what other people's experience of them are.

In the reply I gave above, I was asking what the main purpose of good mornings are in a deadlifting/powerlifting context. In the article I read the main purpose seems to be developing a strong core/erector spinae, as opposed to developing the hamstrings/glutes. Therefore a load that taxes the hamstrings glutes may not be necessary. I say this because in the videos I've seen of people doing GMs, the concentric phase of the movement never appears to be very difficult (comparable say to a working set of squats or deads). So I'm guessing that what really gets taxed is the low back/core. I hope that makes sense.

HP666
06-14-2008, 08:58 AM
One thing you could do with the GM's is use a power rack, set up the pins at parallel, or slightly above, for you that is. When you lower the weight you can touch and go off the pins, or pause for a second, either way you can go heavier and take some of the worry out of it. Another thing you could do to condition this area is banded GM's.
Example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTxTFVELEzQ&feature=related


Can't powerlifting be a bit easier? What's all this cr*p about torque and bands and chains and s***? I mean has no one figured out a way of using star jumps to increase their squat, surely that would make things more accessible for everyone?

As far as this comment goes......maybe you should take up bodybuiding.

Lones Green
06-14-2008, 10:51 AM
One thing you could do with the GM's is use a power rack, set up the pins at parallel, or slightly above, for you that is. When you lower the weight you can touch and go off the pins, or pause for a second, either way you can go heavier and take some of the worry out of it. Another thing you could do to condition this are is banded GM's.
Example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTxTFVELEzQ&feature=related



As far as this comment goes......maybe you should take up bodybuiding.

HAHA

A+ post

but really, if that is your outlook...you should try something else. i love the difficulty of powerlifting.

Mad Max
06-14-2008, 12:08 PM
I was joking when I made that comment. Needless to say powerlifting gets quite technical the more you get in to it, and I am really starting to appreciate that now. However I think someone at my level can probably continue to make progress just by cycling rep/set ranges, but I'm guessing GMs and GHRs are a worthwhile investment for any aspiring powerlifting, so I'll start now.

Thanks for the advice though everyone.