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LevesqueIsKing
06-17-2008, 10:26 PM
This is not a thread to discuss which technique is superior, it's a thread to discuss the differences.

I'd just like to learn more about the topic. When asked the difference by a casual lifter, I usually tell them, "A powerlifter's goal is strength, while a bodybuilder's goal is size," although that can be a confusing concept, seeing as they generally come hand in hand. However, I'd like to get down to details between the two, so that I never mistake one for the other and so I can better contrast the two techniques when asked upon. It would be great if you guys could share your knowledge or post articles about how to differinciate between the two.

Please refrain from dick-ish remarks. I can tell the difference between a guy squatting 1,000x1 and a guy in a glittery thong :) If this is such a stupid thread than just don't post and let it burn in thread hell. As an example, I'd like to be able to give my friends an in-depth response when they ask, "Well then, am I a powerlifter or a Bodybuilder?"

chris mason
06-17-2008, 10:41 PM
Not a bad thread at all.

The difference is really not so great as many think. Consider Sam Byrd and Jeremy Hoornstra as examples of guys who train in a fashion that might be considered more like a bodybuilder yet they are some of the strongest men on the planet on a pound for pound basis.

A powerlifter's goal is to maximize his/her ability in the big 3. A bodybuilder wants to maximize their size and or aesthetic appeal.

BFGUITAR
06-17-2008, 11:06 PM
Chris said it best.

I am curious as to how Sam Byrd trains.... he must incorporate one rep PRs with high reps.

deeder
06-17-2008, 11:11 PM
This is not a thread to discuss which technique is superior, it's a thread to discuss the differences.

I'd just like to learn more about the topic. When asked the difference by a casual lifter, I usually tell them, "A powerlifter's goal is strength, while a bodybuilder's goal is size," although that can be a confusing concept, seeing as they generally come hand in hand. However, I'd like to get down to details between the two, so that I never mistake one for the other and so I can better contrast the two techniques when asked upon. It would be great if you guys could share your knowledge or post articles about how to differinciate between the two.

Please refrain from dick-ish remarks. I can tell the difference between a guy squatting 1,000x1 and a guy in a glittery thong :) If this is such a stupid thread than just don't post and let it burn in thread hell. As an example, I'd like to be able to give my friends an in-depth response when they ask, "Well then, am I a powerlifter or a Bodybuilder?"

You say, "Neither, because you don't compete."

Also, I don't agree that strength and size necessarily go hand in hand. I know some strong ****ers that are small (ie: 165lb class) and also some comparatively weak dudes that are pretty jacked.

chris mason
06-18-2008, 12:00 AM
You say, "Neither, because you don't compete."

Also, I don't agree that strength and size necessarily go hand in hand. I know some strong ****ers that are small (ie: 165lb class) and also some comparatively weak dudes that are pretty jacked.


There is a correlation between strength and size from an individual standpoint. If you hypertrophy your contractile myofibrils you increase the force production capability of said muscle tissue. It takes neural honing to get the most out of said increased force production capability, but it can be said that a larger muscle is a stronger muscle when speaking of the individual.

HP666
06-18-2008, 08:01 AM
It's an interesting topic. Nowadays there's such a division between the two disciplines, it kind of sucks. If you've ever seen the documentary "Power Unlimited" they discuss how back in the day powerlifters and bodybuilders got along better, trained together, had more respect for each other; and this topic is discussed. Any great bodybuilder knows that the big compound lifts are what's needed to really gain mass and lay a strong foundation. There's so much of the "you guys look big, but you're not strong" vs. the whole "you guys are fat and don't eat right and take care of yourselves" etc, etc. The bottom line is any powerlifter or bodybuilder that is really doing it right and training right is working really hard and should be respected. I think if more guys from either camp would look across and take what can be applied from the other they would be much better off and be much more successful in their discipline.

Detard
06-18-2008, 09:32 AM
It's an interesting topic. Nowadays there's such a division between the two disciplines, it kind of sucks. If you've ever seen the documentary "Power Unlimited" they discuss how back in the day powerlifters and bodybuilders got along better, trained together, had more respect for each other; and this topic is discussed. Any great bodybuilder knows that the big compound lifts are what's needed to really gain mass and lay a strong foundation. There's so much of the "you guys look big, but you're not strong" vs. the whole "you guys are fat and don't eat right and take care of yourselves" etc, etc. The bottom line is any powerlifter or bodybuilder that is really doing it right and training right is working really hard and should be respected. I think if more guys from either camp would look across and take what can be applied from the other they would be much better off and be much more successful in their discipline.

Amen

Bob
06-18-2008, 09:40 AM
It's an interesting topic. Nowadays there's such a division between the two disciplines, it kind of sucks. If you've ever seen the documentary "Power Unlimited" they discuss how back in the day powerlifters and bodybuilders got along better, trained together, had more respect for each other; and this topic is discussed. Any great bodybuilder knows that the big compound lifts are what's needed to really gain mass and lay a strong foundation. There's so much of the "you guys look big, but you're not strong" vs. the whole "you guys are fat and don't eat right and take care of yourselves" etc, etc. The bottom line is any powerlifter or bodybuilder that is really doing it right and training right is working really hard and should be respected. I think if more guys from either camp would look across and take what can be applied from the other they would be much better off and be much more successful in their discipline.

:withstupi:
Great post HP...
reminds me of Franco Columbo back in the day.. he was a European champion powerlifting and then BB'er... I think he pushed Arnold heavy... and guys like Tom Platz.. sure was strong for a BB'er..

RhodeHouse
06-18-2008, 09:42 AM
It's an interesting topic. Nowadays there's such a division between the two disciplines, it kind of sucks. If you've ever seen the documentary "Power Unlimited" they discuss how back in the day powerlifters and bodybuilders got along better, trained together, had more respect for each other; and this topic is discussed. Any great bodybuilder knows that the big compound lifts are what's needed to really gain mass and lay a strong foundation. There's so much of the "you guys look big, but you're not strong" vs. the whole "you guys are fat and don't eat right and take care of yourselves" etc, etc. The bottom line is any powerlifter or bodybuilder that is really doing it right and training right is working really hard and should be respected. I think if more guys from either camp would look across and take what can be applied from the other they would be much better off and be much more successful in their discipline.

I agree. to a point. I think the guys that are "real" bodybuilders - the guys who compete or are preparing to compete, don't knock us fat powerlifters and visa versa. It'a always the small weak guys that rip on the jacked up guys. Or, the drug-free guys that boil everything down to a guys drug use as the sole reason for his success.

It's the nobodies that criticize. I train at Southside with a BBer who also powerlifts. He trains hard, eats well, and just has a slightly different goal in mind right now. There's a ton of respect given to him because he works his ass off.. It's usually the nobodies that have no respect on both sides of the coin. I think it's jealousy and a lack of determination to achieve your goals that brings out the debate. The guys in the game have respect, I think.

HP666
06-18-2008, 10:11 AM
I agree. to a point. I think the guys that are "real" bodybuilders - the guys who compete or are preparing to compete, don't knock us fat powerlifters and visa versa. It'a always the small weak guys that rip on the jacked up guys. Or, the drug-free guys that boil everything down to a guys drug use as the sole reason for his success.

It's the nobodies that criticize. I train at Southside with a BBer who also powerlifts. He trains hard, eats well, and just has a slightly different goal in mind right now. There's a ton of respect given to him because he works his ass off.. It's usually the nobodies that have no respect on both sides of the coin. I think it's jealousy and a lack of determination to achieve your goals that brings out the debate. The guys in the game have respect, I think.

I agree with that 100%.

Travis Bell
06-18-2008, 10:54 AM
Right now my training partner is an ex-bodybuilder. I used to do bbing before seeing the light. Like Rhodes said, its just a different goal. I have lots of respect for guys who dedicate themselves to bbing and do very well in it. Takes ALOT of time and effort

I still get a kick out of seeing pictures from the Olympia and Jay Cutler and all those guys. Those guys sure are huge.

Phil Bailey
06-18-2008, 04:31 PM
There are guys who do both very well. Look at Justin Harris or Johnny Jackson. They compete in both and have impressive physiques. A guy like Johnny Jackson credits his physique and improvements to his powerlifting training and keeps his big three under 5 reps most of the time. He is actually gunning for a 2400lbs total. So the 2 can go hand in hand.