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View Full Version : Why I can train as often as I do (great post by Borris)



Fuzzy
07-03-2008, 08:27 PM
The secret is recovery.


One of the big areas that has been regularly ignored by the Western training world but embraced by the Eastern world is on restoration techniques. Granted, some of their stuff is a little out there (mumai, or however it's spelled, anyone?), but there's a lot of high volume stuff from the old Alexeyev, Sheiko, etc writing/training.

Alexeyev was known for all kinds of restoration work such as water walking, etc.

As an athletic culture they had a much bigger focus on GPP than most of our athletes did/do (it's starting to change). Better GPP + Better Restoration = Higher work capacity/volume programs. That doesn't always translate to better results, but it's something to think about.

This is perhaps one of the best posts ever.

I prefer not to overthink things, especially my own training, instead I focus on doing what I am told by good coaches. However, I feel it is important to put this out for discussion.

I am currently training 7-9 times a week. I have a respectable squat and my main lifts are steadily increasing. Why do I train this often? Well, it's a standard Olympic lifting protocol. I am guessing that the complexity of the movements require that the athlete practice with maximal and near maximal loads as often as possible. Once again, this is my own opinion and frankly, I dont care enough to ask.T his makes sense, and it works wonders as my results as well as many other people's have proved.

What is more interesting however, is not the training itself, but how I prepare, recover and survive this type of frequency.

There are two parts to this.
Recovery; massage, self applied tissue work, sauana, cold baths etc
Active recovery; GPP (light cycling etc) and water walking amongst other such things.

Perhaps the most ignored part of lifting is massage, and the sorry condition of many people is testimony to the lack of it. When you lift a heavy load your muscles tear and rebuild. This is basic. However, during the rebuilding process deposits of scar tissue form on the muscle and trigger points occur between muscles.

(A trigger point is were two seperate muscle fibres become entangled by scar tissue and bind together)

The effects of this are obvious, and when people are injured the advice is often to simply rest. This does NOT fix the problem, the scar tissue is still there, and it needs to be removed.

Personally, I receive 3 deep tissue massages in a fortnight, I am talking deeeeeep. Between that I daily work in a cycling pattern on my legs, upper back, chest etc with a hard ball and a foam roller. I sauna and cold bathe twice a week, and make sure to do some form of easy swimming or cycling as well as a regular game of basketball.

This is how I train with maximal loads this often.

Now, if a teenager can do this as well as stay up too late, cram for exams, not sleep the occasional night and still occasionally drink, so can most people. However, I am not supporting a family or leading a busy lifestyle and I have incredibly supportive parents and coaches, I do take this into account. But a busy life is no excuse to not do some easy foam rolling 3 times a week for 20 minutes. Something this simple can spare you pain and suffering for many many years.

I have 'you are overtraining' said to me on forums almost daily. Well... were is the proof? I have been training like this for over 6 months, I was worked up to this, starting with 3 times a week and gradually icnreasing over a few months.

I am happy to answer any questions, and I hope this encourages some thinking as people begin to see what they are missing.

Szust
07-03-2008, 08:36 PM
I had a so called "trigger point" as you say. Was in my quad. I did foam rolling pins on the ground for about 2 weeks before my leg workouts, and the pain was gone forever.

TheSeeker
07-03-2008, 08:50 PM
Hmmmmm, yo Fuzz? Do you mind if I check your journal? It really seems like I can learn a ****load of stuff from you. Thanks.

Fuzzy
07-03-2008, 08:53 PM
Hmmmmm, yo Fuzz? Do you mind if I check your journal? It really seems like I can learn a ****load of stuff from you. Thanks.

I do not keep a journal. Journal requires you log and think too much. I dont like to do that.

TheSeeker
07-03-2008, 08:53 PM
I do not keep a journal. Journal requires you log and think too much. I dont like to do that.

OH COME ON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :(

Fuzzy
07-03-2008, 08:56 PM
OH COME ON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :(

Do not ruin this thread, if you have a question ask me.

Once again, I like to not think aboutmy training as much as possible. This will make me a stronger person.

TheSeeker
07-03-2008, 09:06 PM
Hey Fuzz, you once told me about your am pm routine or somethin'. Can you post that again? I can't find the first one.

And PLEASE BE AS SPECIFIC AS POSSIBLE with your weights/sets/reps/rest durations and whatnots! Thank you.

Fuzzy
07-03-2008, 09:10 PM
Monday AM and PM
Tuesday PM
Wed AM and PM
Thursday PM
Friday AM and PM
Saturday AM

I will not disclose my current routine, even though the changes very very very often. Rest periods between sets are 2-4 minutes, more on maximal attempts. Usually go no higher than 4 reps and 5 sets. Mostly in the 1-3 range.

TheSeeker
07-03-2008, 09:14 PM
What about the intensity of your workouts? How often do you go "balls to the wall" with your heavy low rep sets?

Travis Bell
07-03-2008, 09:17 PM
I would agree, I'm a big big believer in recovery lifting. If I counted my recovery stuff, technically then I bench 4-5 times a week and train tri's 4 times a week. If not on a DE or ME day though its typically DB benching and super duper light. The point is solely to get the blood moving to the muscle to help speed recovery. When I choose not to increase blood flow by exercising it, I'll simple heat it up, but most times I find the stretching involved in DB benching is very helpful. Lou is the one who turned me on to recovery lifting.

Chubrock
07-03-2008, 09:21 PM
What about the intensity of your workouts? How often do you go "balls to the wall" with your heavy low rep sets?

Jesus Christ, somebody ban this kid already.

Fuzzy
07-03-2008, 09:21 PM
I would agree, I'm a big big believer in recovery lifting. If I counted my recovery stuff, technically then I bench 4-5 times a week and train tri's 4 times a week. If not on a DE or ME day though its typically DB benching and super duper light. The point is solely to get the blood moving to the muscle to help speed recovery. When I choose not to increase blood flow by exercising it, I'll simple heat it up, but most times I find the stretching involved in DB benching is very helpful. Lou is the one who turned me on to recovery lifting.

That's awesome trav, thanks for the post. I do that often with bw and bar squats..

If you dont mind me asking, what other techniques are you guys big on? Do any of you gett massage?

Travis Bell
07-03-2008, 09:40 PM
Yep. That or a chiropractor haha. I don't get massage as much as I should though. My back takes a real beating and I should treat it better.

we do alot of stretching, I know some of the guys have experimented with ART therapy and liked it. Spending more time warming up at times can be very helpful as well

Fuzzy
07-03-2008, 09:45 PM
Yep. That or a chiropractor haha. I don't get massage as much as I should though. My back takes a real beating and I should treat it better.

we do alot of stretching, I know some of the guys have experimented with ART therapy and liked it. Spending more time warming up at times can be very helpful as well

Im 16 and ART made a HUGE difference. I could only imagine what it would do for someone who has alot more loading on them for alot longer than I have.

Try it, you really wont be sorry.

Sensei
07-04-2008, 12:09 AM
I think we've been over all of this before, but it's not surprising at all that someone with competent coaching can thrive on training daily and even greater frequencies. The problem with most people who populate internet forums is that they feel a training session is "blast-your-body-part-to-bits" affair, and wouldn't even think that you could improve recovery by working the very same muscle or exercise.

I don't think I'm disagreeing w. anything you said in your original post Fuzzy, but you do have some major things going for you that make what you're doing now possible - you're very young, you're relatively inexperienced, decent genetics, student lifestyle, good diet, good coaching, good support system. Don't diminish the importance of those things.

You're points are well taken - most people have no idea how hard they can work and don't ever even come close to pushing the envelope. BUT, most people, even properly motivated, would crumple after a few weeks of concentrated loading because they'd have no idea when to back off or how to properly distribute volume and intensity. No, it's not rocket science, but most athletes love to push because "hey it got me this far, right?" and it's pretty easy to push way too long, too hard, especially if you don't have all the good things going for you mentioned in the previous paragraph.

Just some thoughts to add - again, not a critique at all.