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View Full Version : Myth (Protein Evey 2-3 Hours)



Maki Riddington
03-25-2002, 11:40 AM
I don't know how many times it's been mentioned but do we really need a steady stream of protein every 2-3 hours.
Our amnio acid pools aren't drained after this time period so why do we need it every couple hours?

Anthony
03-25-2002, 11:41 AM
Because we are hungry.

Maki Riddington
03-25-2002, 11:44 AM
Why not eat some complex carbs then. They have protein in them? They may not be complete but if we ate complete proteins in larger quantities every 4-5 hours wouldn't that suffice?

Anthony
03-25-2002, 01:45 PM
Potatoes don't taste as good as steak/roast beef/bbq chicken. It's simple, if you ask me. :)

Seriously, though, I don't have as much preoccupation with eating protein every 2-3 hours as I do with simply eating every 2-3 hours.

hemants
03-25-2002, 01:46 PM
The question, Maki, is how long do our amino acid pools store excess protein?

Answer that and you'll have the answer.

Podium Kreatin
03-25-2002, 02:20 PM
i think hte reason we do this is to optimize protein intake. there's a limit u can absorb at once i think, and if our body can efficiently absorb protein every 2-3 hours, it's prolly best to exploit that ability, rite?
also, remember that not all protein turns into msucle protein, only a portion of protein becomes muscle, the others, for enzymes and other bodily uses. so taking protein 2-3 hours can also facilitate muscle building b/c it helps our bodies make other proteins, which can assist muscle synth

also, where did u get that there was protein in complx carbs? carbs and peptides are different macromolecules (carbs dont contain nitrogen).

hemants
03-25-2002, 02:22 PM
Podium, the point is that if the body can store excess protein from a meal and utilize it for all the things you mention over a period of 7 or 8 or even 15 hours, then we don't need to eat it every 2-3 hours.

So the million dollar question remains, how long can our amino acid pools store excess protein?

body
03-25-2002, 04:20 PM
its hard to eat 200+ grams in one sitting, so easier to spread them out.

Maki Riddington
03-25-2002, 05:11 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Podium Kreatin
[B]i think hte reason we do this is to optimize protein intake. there's a limit u can absorb at once i think, and if our body can efficiently absorb protein every 2-3 hours, it's prolly best to exploit that ability, rite?

*** But where has it been stated that we should take in protein every 2-3 hours. Where did this originate from. Is this just another myth?

also, remember that not all protein turns into msucle protein, only a portion of protein becomes muscle, the others, for enzymes and other bodily uses. so taking protein 2-3 hours can also facilitate muscle building b/c it helps our bodies make other proteins, which can assist muscle synth

*** But that's not why it's been taught we should take in protein every couple hours. It has to to do with catobolism and muscle tissue.


also, where did u get that there was protein in complx carbs? carbs and peptides are different macromolecules (carbs dont contain nitrogen).

*** Can you explain why it says that there is 10 grams of protein in 85 grams of dry pasta on the package I just bought?

Maki Riddington
03-25-2002, 05:13 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by hemants
[B]The question, Maki, is how long do our amino acid pools store excess protein?

*** That would be dependant on our activity levels among other things.
I can see it being a safety net thing to take in some protein every 2-3 hours but is it really nessecary?

TreeTrunks
03-25-2002, 10:13 PM
I agree with body. You need to spread your intake out.

YatesNightBlade
03-26-2002, 02:41 AM
I agree with body too. If you need 300g for optimum growth .... when are you gonna eat it. Is it not wise to keep these amino pools constantly supplied with protein ? Of course it is !

The_Chicken_Daddy
03-26-2002, 05:51 AM
I like to keep a steady stream of amino acids in my blood stream. Keeps me in a positive nitrogen balance.

the doc
03-26-2002, 07:09 AM
maki i think it is basicly a myth to a certain extent but greatly depends on the variables
Your blood amino levels will be kept relatively constant through various mechanisms- significant changes are buffered.

Now where you get the aminos is what is important. If you eat protein throughout the day, aminos will be accessable from the small intestine instead of from lbm. If you dont have protein in there then it will start catabolizing tissue to provide aminos.

However here is where it is myth
Lets say you eat a 1 lb steak- well that thing is going to take a while to digest so you could wait much longer for more protein.

Bullrider Billy
03-26-2002, 08:43 AM
You're also going to help stabilize blood sugar. If you constantly ate carbs to satisfy your hunger, you would be producing insulin, which in turn adds to your appetite (because it lowers blood sugar levels). Consuming protein releases glucagon, an anti-insulin hormone. Blood sugar levels are stabilized, with less hunger and risk of fat storage.

Yes, pasta does have some protein. A typical serving has 6g of protein. But being plant derived, the protein is not "complete". You'd need to complement it with protein from another source.

I know for a fact that you can reference and even contact Fred Hatfield, PhD, aka Dr. Squat for a recommendation on eating protein every couple of hours, pretty much for the reasons I mentioned above (pretty much where I got it from!).

hemants
03-26-2002, 09:31 AM
Your body breaks down protein into amino acids and stores these in amino acid pools - anecodotal internet searching has these things storing 3-6 hours worth of your body's requirements but this number needs to be verified.

The implication of this would be that you need to replenish these pools every 3 to 6 hours.

The other implication is that whether a protein is complete or not doesn't matter as long as your next meal is abundant in the amino acids that your previous one was low in.

body
03-26-2002, 12:43 PM
pasta does contian protien. anywya between 6-12 grams dry weight per 100 grams.

maki- do you think 2-3 hours is effected by your job?
eg a person working on a building site with a elavated metabolism over resting level, will have the same requirement as his twin borther working in a office all day?

Jane
03-26-2002, 02:20 PM
Actually, I recently read an article that discussed protein very in depth and I thought it was interesting. It was written by Lyle McDonald and has 4 parts. I think protein digestability is discussed in the 2nd part, but the whole series is a good, detailed look at our requirements for protein.

http://www.thinkmuscle.com/articles/mcdonald/protein-01.htm

hemants
03-26-2002, 03:21 PM
Excellent article!

Doesn't really talk about amino acid pools but it raises another important point.

Protein is digested slowly over time. I suppose if you were taking whey as your only FOOD source then a case could be made for ingesting it every 4 hours.

But the fact that other foods slow down the digestion of protein probably means that eating protein every 2 to 3 hours is unnecessary.

That being said, the metabolic benefits of eating frequent balanced meals are still good enough reason to do so.

Maki Riddington
03-26-2002, 05:29 PM
Originally posted by hemants
Excellent article!

Doesn't really talk about amino acid pools but it raises another important point.

Protein is digested slowly over time. I suppose if you were taking whey as your only FOOD source then a case could be made for ingesting it every 4 hours.

But the fact that other foods slow down the digestion of protein probably means that eating protein every 2 to 3 hours is unnecessary.

That being said, the metabolic benefits of eating frequent balanced meals are still good enough reason to do so.

*** There, that is my point. We don't need to be eating protein every 2-3 hours if it's our chief concern that muscle will be eaten away at.

I agree that if our ratios are such that we need to eat 300 grams a day. Then spreading it out would be a sensible thing to do.

Jane
03-26-2002, 07:20 PM
Originally posted by hemants
Excellent article!


:thumbup:

I got used to eating protein in each meal when I was first learning it's importance and it just stuck.
Although now I do have a breakfast with only cereal and skim milk, a measely 26g of protein that still bothers me slightly :)

the doc
03-26-2002, 08:15 PM
mix some of that american whey in there girl!@

Jane
03-26-2002, 08:26 PM
Nah, I actually am getting plenty of protein (possibly more than I need...about 45% of calories), but just having that one meal where I don't get at least thirty decent grams makes me slightly nervous :)
Thanks for the suggestion though :thumbup:

Blood&Iron
03-26-2002, 09:05 PM
Originally posted by Jane
Actually, I recently read an article that discussed protein very in depth and I thought it was interesting. It was written by Lyle McDonald and has 4 parts. I think protein digestability is discussed in the 2nd part, but the whole series is a good, detailed look at our requirements for protein.

http://www.thinkmuscle.com/articles/mcdonald/protein-01.htm
Thanks for the link. I wasn't even aware he had finished the series. I hadn't yet seen the last two articles.

BTW, I think he answers just about every question that's been posed here. I'm wondering if people actually read them.

Jane
03-26-2002, 09:28 PM
No problem :thumbup:

You heard the man,
Read the article, folks!
lol :)

plornive
03-27-2002, 03:12 PM
Originally posted by Bullrider Billy
You're also going to help stabilize blood sugar. If you constantly ate carbs to satisfy your hunger, you would be producing insulin, which in turn adds to your appetite (because it lowers blood sugar levels). Consuming protein releases glucagon, an anti-insulin hormone. Blood sugar levels are stabilized, with less hunger and risk of fat storage.

Yes, pasta does have some protein. A typical serving has 6g of protein. But being plant derived, the protein is not "complete". You'd need to complement it with protein from another source.

I know for a fact that you can reference and even contact Fred Hatfield, PhD, aka Dr. Squat for a recommendation on eating protein every couple of hours, pretty much for the reasons I mentioned above (pretty much where I got it from!).

Glucagon does not prevent insulin secretion or any of it's negative effects. It simply returns blood sugar to baseline. If glucagon was NOT secreted, insulin would be LESS likely to be secreted later. However, glucagon helps to turn fat burning and gluconeogenesis on, which can be positive if not too much muscle protein is catabolized.

body
03-27-2002, 06:58 PM
that why I prefer insulin response over GI.
but I need to learn more about IR as not so much data as compared to GI.