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Preston129
07-29-2008, 12:08 PM
Hi everyone,
I'm a new member but have been lurking for a while.

I've noticed when I pull sumo I have the tendency to straighten the legs too soon and in effect turn it into a stiff legged deadlift.

I know this is a challenging question to answer without having a video of my pulls, but in general terms, would this be a failure of technique (simply not getting my ass down and head up enough) or of strength (weak hams/hips)?

Thanks guys.

Lones Green
07-29-2008, 12:18 PM
definetely need a video posted. sounds like form, but you could also have a bad weakness somewhere.

Tom Mutaffis
07-29-2008, 12:31 PM
I have seen an early lockout a lot more with sumo pullers than conventional. It may have something to do with your positioning or how you are initiating the lift. Have you tried pulling conventional to see how that feels?

If you can post a video that would be ideal. You may want to watch some video online as well to look at how others setup and begin their pull...

SGT ROCK
07-29-2008, 12:58 PM
Post a vid and we will def help you.

Semper Fi

Preston129
07-29-2008, 01:52 PM
I have seen an early lockout a lot more with sumo pullers than conventional. It may have something to do with your positioning or how you are initiating the lift. Have you tried pulling conventional to see how that feels?

If you can post a video that would be ideal. You may want to watch some video online as well to look at how others setup and begin their pull...

pulling conventional definitely feels more natural, but the fact that I'm not using much leg drive (and straight legging it) leads me to believe that i'd be stronger at it if i figured out how to get an Anderson-squat type of effect from straightening out the legs.

The two lifters I've tried to study most are Kutcher and Vogelpohl; out of the two, I'd say my style mimmicks Vogelpohl's most, only because his hips don't get too low to the bar much like mine.

I'll try to get a video this friday when if I pull again. Which angle would be most telling? From the front, rear or side?

Tom Mutaffis
07-29-2008, 02:45 PM
I would say that front angle would be good so that we can see how you setup and if you hit any kind of sticking points or anything. You can tell if the bar is drifting away from the body or if you have your hips too high or any other technique flaws from that angle as well...

How is your flexibility? I know that I had some mechanics issues with my deadlifting after I had gained about 10-15 lbs in 2 months.

Ben Moore
07-29-2008, 03:15 PM
Get one from the side as well.

Tom Mutaffis
07-29-2008, 03:30 PM
Get one from the side as well.

Good call, then we can see if your back is rounding and exactly when your legs lock out.

Preston129
08-02-2008, 08:09 PM
Hey guys, I took 3 vids last night, worked on a couple things like looking up and keeping my chest out to hopefully correct some of the problems I've been having.

I don't have 10 posts yet, so you'll have to look on youtube for me: my username is 129Preston and the easiest way to find the video (it's the only one) is to type in youtube dotcom/129Preston.

Ben/Tom: I would have gotten a vid from the side except I hit my foot on the way down on the last pull and decided to call it a day right there:mad:

Lones Green
08-02-2008, 09:23 PM
there wasn't too much wrong with those pulls - just work on trying to pull "back" more.

mike42506
08-02-2008, 09:33 PM
ouuuuchh i saw that last one hit your toe

Preston129
08-02-2008, 10:42 PM
ouuuuchh i saw that last one hit your toe

ya, I widened up my stance on that last pull and it obviously wasn't a good idea.

Szust
08-02-2008, 11:42 PM
I like the Forza Motorsports shirt.

Preston129
08-03-2008, 12:32 AM
I like the Forza Motorsports shirt.

it's actually a Forza strength systems shirt, but it's a pretty solid game tho!

Szust
08-03-2008, 12:33 AM
it's actually a Forza strength systems shirt, but it's a pretty solid game tho!

Heh, same font and everything.

Sean S
08-03-2008, 01:50 PM
It looks like you drop down in good position, but you aren't holding it as the bar clears the floor. Your hips shoot up and back a little, which dumps your upper body forward a little. The reason for this could be strength related, technique related, or a little bit of both.
For the technique side:
- really think about pulling your shoulders back and pushing your hips forward as soon as the bar clears the floor (obviously practice this with some non-maximal weights for a few weeks, then work up and try to maintain that form)
- Figure out where the optimal hip height is for you. Lower isn't always better either. Optimal is where as soon as the hips move up, the bar moves up with it. You will just have to experiment and figure out what works best for you.

Also, work on getting everything stronger (especially the glutes, hamstrings, and low back). For instance, part of the reason your hips may be shooting up is that they aren't strong enough in that low position to break the bar from the floor. Thus, they shoot up to a position of more favorable leverage (same reason why you can 1/4 SQ more than you can full SQ).

Preston129
08-04-2008, 06:59 AM
It looks like you drop down in good position, but you aren't holding it as the bar clears the floor. Your hips shoot up and back a little, which dumps your upper body forward a little. The reason for this could be strength related, technique related, or a little bit of both.
For the technique side:
- really think about pulling your shoulders back and pushing your hips forward as soon as the bar clears the floor (obviously practice this with some non-maximal weights for a few weeks, then work up and try to maintain that form)
- Figure out where the optimal hip height is for you. Lower isn't always better either. Optimal is where as soon as the hips move up, the bar moves up with it. You will just have to experiment and figure out what works best for you.

Also, work on getting everything stronger (especially the glutes, hamstrings, and low back). For instance, part of the reason your hips may be shooting up is that they aren't strong enough in that low position to break the bar from the floor. Thus, they shoot up to a position of more favorable leverage (same reason why you can 1/4 SQ more than you can full SQ).

That's a very good point; I hadn't been conscious of when the hips were being activated. Most of the time I would concentrate only on setting up tight and pulling back, but never paid much attention to pushing the hips through.

I'll be mindful to lower the box on DE days and add in more pull throughs for assistance work from now on.