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View Full Version : How not working out to failure is better ARTICLE!



kodyhartl
07-30-2008, 12:43 AM
Differential effects of strength training leading to failure versus not to failure on hormonal responses, strength, and muscle power gains
of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey; 5Department of Kinesiology, Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut; and 6Institute of Sport, Northumbria University, Newcastle, United Kingdom


The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of 11 wk of resistance training to failure vs. nonfailure, followed by an identical 5-wk peaking period of maximal strength and power training for both groups as well as to examine the underlying physiological changes in basal circulating anabolic and catabolic hormones. Forty-two physically active men were matched and then randomly assigned to either a training to failure (RF; n = 14), nonfailure (NRF; n = 15), or control groups (C; n = 13). Muscular and power testing and blood draws to determine basal hormonal concentrations were conducted before the initiation of training (T0), after 6 wk of training (T1), after 11 wk of training (T2), and after 16 wk of training (T3). Both RF and NRF resulted in similar gains in 1-repetition maximum bench press (23 and 23%) and parallel squat (22 and 23%), muscle power output of the arm (27 and 28%) and leg extensor muscles (26 and 29%), and maximal number of repetitions performed during parallel squat (66 and 69%). RF group experienced larger gains in the maximal number of repetitions performed during the bench press. The peaking phase (T2 to T3) after NRF resulted in larger gains in muscle power output of the lower extremities, whereas after RF it resulted in larger gains in the maximal number of repetitions performed during the bench press. Strength training leading to RF resulted in reductions in resting concentrations of IGF-1 and elevations in IGFBP-3, whereas NRF resulted in reduced resting cortisol concentrations and an elevation in resting serum total testosterone concentration. This investigation demonstrated a potential beneficial stimulus of NRF for improving strength and power, especially during the subsequent peaking training period, whereas performing sets to failure resulted in greater gains in local muscular endurance. Elevation in IGFBP-3 after resistance training may have been compensatory to accommodate the reduction in IGF-1 to preserve IGF availability.

strength training; repetition to failure; insulin-like growth factor 1; insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3; testosterone; cortisol

IF YOU WANT THE ACTUAL ADDRESS JUST LET ME KNOW CAUSE I DID NOT HAVE ENOUGH POSTS YET!

Cards
07-30-2008, 02:16 AM
I like it.

still, it was only done once and not replicated since. Unless it's performed again and yields the same results, take it at face value.

still, I like it.

WillKuenzel
07-30-2008, 05:08 AM
Smells like a troll. You come on with one post and post just a study. No thoughts of your own and want people to PM you for a link to it?

You're in the powerlifting section. You do know that, right? Many guys here don't go to failure. Failure means missing a lift. There's not many guys I know that ever advocate missing a lift. Always leave a little in the tank. You give it all up on the platform, not in the gym.

You're not posting anything new. Care to elaborate as to why you thought this was ground-breaking?

Travis Bell
07-30-2008, 06:23 AM
Smells like a troll.


Agreed

kodyhartl
07-30-2008, 10:46 AM
Sorry I used to post on here before I promise I am not a troll. This was a little article I had found and was interested in, I had been looking around for some information on working to failure cause I personally never do I push it to a good point but not to failure. So anyway I just thought this article was good.

kodyhartl
07-30-2008, 10:48 AM
I also found this little piece of article that I have been checking out lately by Rusty Moore that I liked about strength training and how working to failure is bad for gaining strength and that its more of a bodybuilder thing or something.

Guido
07-30-2008, 11:35 AM
Smells like a troll. You come on with one post and post just a study. No thoughts of your own and want people to PM you for a link to it?

You're in the powerlifting section. You do know that, right? Many guys here don't go to failure. Failure means missing a lift. There's not many guys I know that ever advocate missing a lift. Always leave a little in the tank. You give it all up on the platform, not in the gym.

You're not posting anything new. Care to elaborate as to why you thought this was ground-breaking?I second that. Not really groundbreaking stuff to most powerlifters.

kodyhartl
07-30-2008, 11:42 AM
Sorry nevermind just thought it was interesting cause I don't lift to failure and have heard all the controversy back and forth.

kodyhartl
07-30-2008, 11:46 AM
Okay then does anyone wanna elaborate on there personnal opinion.

WillKuenzel
07-30-2008, 12:06 PM
Nope. You still seem like a troll. Do some more reading, go lift some weights and when you start doing more than post whoring, we'll talk.

Hazerboy
07-30-2008, 04:04 PM
Science validating what we already know once again. Kind of interesting, and I always like to see fitness research, but once again strength trainess have known this forever - read "Dinosaur training." Old timers used to always train heavy singles but hardly ever max out, because they knew that training to failure made them weaker in the long run.

kodyhartl
07-31-2008, 01:17 AM
The only reason I brought it up is that there is so much controversy to it and everything and I am starting a new program and came across this article and thought it was cool I just have never been one to train to failure just to work out hard.

WillKuenzel
07-31-2008, 07:40 AM
The controversy you're so concerned with, rests between powerlifters and bodybuilders, old school bodybuilders at that, too. Two totally different means of training for two totally different things, as should be expected. Many powerlifters even use some version of the Sheiko programming which rarely reaches 90%, so failure isn't an option. I'm not sure where you're getting your information but it's extremely outdated.

kodyhartl
07-31-2008, 11:20 AM
Well the main thing I know is that for strenth trainers you don't wanna train to failure.

Travis Bell
07-31-2008, 11:33 AM
Which is true to a point. At training to failure does have its place in strength training when concerning GPP, but this isn't new information.