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fpr
08-02-2008, 12:31 PM
I've decided to start up a sport now that I'm transferring to a four year university. The only thing that they had that looked like it was of interest and would continue to allow me to do lifting was Crew (rowing).

Anyone know of any routines (I can always google, I know)? I'm sure most people will say crossfit but whenver I log onto their site they have so much **** up there I can never find a routine or figure out how to get started, even when I click on the links to the left.... anything else other than crossfit?

More specifically I would like to know the entire spectrum.... from weight lifting, to cardio, etc.

Willie
08-02-2008, 01:25 PM
I'm sure your rowing coach will have something for you, but in the meantime, you could look around at these sites:

http://home.hia.no/~stephens/rowstre.htm

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/rowing-training.html

http://www.sideproperty.com/rowing/

Good luck!

KingJustin
08-02-2008, 04:37 PM
I've decided to start up a sport now that I'm transferring to a four year university. The only thing that they had that looked like it was of interest and would continue to allow me to do lifting was Crew (rowing).

Anyone know of any routines (I can always google, I know)? I'm sure most people will say crossfit but whenver I log onto their site they have so much **** up there I can never find a routine or figure out how to get started, even when I click on the links to the left.... anything else other than crossfit?

More specifically I would like to know the entire spectrum.... from weight lifting, to cardio, etc.

Haha CrossFit has the easiest site ever to navigate!

You go to http://www.crossfit.com before you go to the gym. Then you look in the middle of the page for the day's workout. Warm-up. Do the workout listed. Cool down. Stretch. Done. Go back tomorrow. (it's 3 days on, 1 day off)

You can start doing today's workout today. CrossFit doesn't have 9 week routines or anything like that prescribed specifically for rowing. Within every 2-4 weeks, everything is worked on, so you can start up at any point.

Anyway, my general advice is to do the CrossFit workouts each day for 2 months at least. After that, you'll want to get more sport-specific. I imagine for rowing you would want a strong BB Row/cheat BB row/cheat pulley row/front squat; you'd want to focus on plenty of row repeats and long-distance rowing as well ... I would recommend eventually checking out crossfitendurance.com. But, the general plan needs to be to develop general fitness and then move on to specific fitness. You'll plateau way too early if you get into the specific stuff right away.

ryuage
08-02-2008, 11:38 PM
you want to row then row... and not only row, but row a lot.

be ready for hours of rowing starting at the butt crack of dawn.

n4rd0
08-05-2008, 05:43 PM
you want to row then row... and not only row, but row a lot.

be ready for hours of rowing starting at the butt crack of dawn.

What he said. I did crew for a year in highschool and my god it sucked. The next best thing to getting in the boat is getting on an urg / erg. Not sure how to spell it but its a rowing machine. That will help a good amount and should be the staple of your workout.

KingJustin
08-05-2008, 06:10 PM
I mostly disagree. I ran Cross Country for 4 years and high school and that was the general philosophy of my coach in high school.

After not doing any cardio for several years and putting on 70lbs, now after about 1.5 years of CrossFit I am right at my high school PRs and I don't even train specifically for Cross Country. If I switched to sport-specific training I'd continue to improve significantly.

My point being that doing nothing but a lot of rowing is, imo, not a great strategy. Even if you were going to do all sport-specific stuff, you don't want to "just row." You'll want to conjugate your training the same way as powerlifting: some extra long distance, some medium distance, some sprint repeats, some speed work, some plyometric type stuff, etc.

But, again, I think it would be greatly advantageous long term to start with general fitness and move on to rowing.

Willie
08-05-2008, 07:45 PM
My point being that doing nothing but a lot of rowing is, imo, not a great strategy. Even if you were going to do all sport-specific stuff, you don't want to "just row." You'll want to conjugate your training the same way as powerlifting: some extra long distance, some medium distance, some sprint repeats, some speed work, some plyometric type stuff, etc.

But, again, I think it would be greatly advantageous long term to start with general fitness and move on to rowing.

I agree here. I used to see our row club running as a group.

That said, Eddie Merycx, five time winner of the Tour De France, said the way to win was "ride lots."

ryuage
08-05-2008, 09:42 PM
I'll disagree, many elite rowers do just that... JUST ROW. Some incorporate cross training and some incorporate weight training, but some are still not sold on it. Fact of the matter is that he should focus his efforts on rowing and supplement it with whatever... whether that be other forms of cardio, plyometrics, or weight training. You want to row better then row... simple as that.


I mostly disagree. I ran Cross Country for 4 years and high school and that was the general philosophy of my coach in high school.

After not doing any cardio for several years and putting on 70lbs, now after about 1.5 years of CrossFit I am right at my high school PRs and I don't even train specifically for Cross Country. If I switched to sport-specific training I'd continue to improve significantly.

My point being that doing nothing but a lot of rowing is, imo, not a great strategy. Even if you were going to do all sport-specific stuff, you don't want to "just row." You'll want to conjugate your training the same way as powerlifting: some extra long distance, some medium distance, some sprint repeats, some speed work, some plyometric type stuff, etc.

But, again, I think it would be greatly advantageous long term to start with general fitness and move on to rowing.

KingJustin
08-05-2008, 11:17 PM
This is a good debate, and one that a lot of elite athletes are definitely having.


I would guess that most elite steady-state-cardio type athletes (runners, bikers, rowers, swimmers) are moving to cross-training now, so I think it's unfair to use them as proof for your point.

Also, what I meant by not just rowing is that imo you shouldn't underthink things. For example, if I was running cross country again, I would interpret "just run" as "go run 6-10 miles as often as possible." Rather, I think you should at least have a good mix all the way through of hills, hill repeats, speed work, sprint repeats, mile repeats, long slow distance, pace runs, 5k races, etc.

I also think you should cross train because of the additional benefits that it has compared to just rowing (i.e. better physique development, better development of fitness in general, more transferable skills to other events) since you don't seem like you care all that much.

ryuage
08-05-2008, 11:29 PM
This is a good debate, and one that a lot of elite athletes are definitely having.


I would guess that most elite steady-state-cardio type athletes (runners, bikers, rowers, swimmers) are moving to cross-training now, so I think it's unfair to use them as proof for your point.

Also, what I meant by not just rowing is that imo you shouldn't underthink things. For example, if I was running cross country again, I would interpret "just run" as "go run 6-10 miles as often as possible." Rather, I think you should at least have a good mix all the way through of hills, hill repeats, speed work, sprint repeats, mile repeats, long slow distance, pace runs, 5k races, etc.

I also think you should cross train because of the additional benefits that it has compared to just rowing (i.e. better physique development, better development of fitness in general, more transferable skills to other events) since you don't seem like you care all that much.

you're right... and all of those are forms of running.

ryuage
08-05-2008, 11:31 PM
I believe in weight training for all athletes regardless of strength or endurance based.

For rowing his core of his workouts should be based around rowing... whether that be intervals, short distances, easy long distances, hard medium distances...

Fuzzy
08-06-2008, 05:04 AM
A session of narrow stance squats with plenty of knee travel, sldl and/or powercleans, BB rows and presses is all rowers need.

KingJustin
08-06-2008, 09:12 AM
Ryuage -- You are correct in that all of those are forms of rowing. I just think that the advice "just row" isn't clear enough... (And I still think cross-training is the way to go)



A session of narrow stance squats with plenty of knee travel, sldl and/or powercleans, BB rows and presses is all rowers need.

Let's talk muscle imbalances, Fuzzy.

Anthony
08-07-2008, 12:54 PM
I imagine for rowing you would want a strong BB Row/cheat BB row/cheat pulley row/front squat

Remember, it's a hip/leg dominate movement - you don't want to emphasize arm pulling in rowing just like you don't emphasize it in a clean.

Heavy deadlifts will do more for rowing than all of the above combined. Throw in some chinups and your set.

But yeah, CF is a great base for rowing - there are a few boats in this years Olympics that have incorporated CF into their cross training. But you'll still have to row a ton - whether you agree or disagree it's how it's coached.

bas2178
08-07-2008, 03:09 PM
Are you rowing right now? If you're not, you're going to spend a crapload of time working on your form when you get to college and have a coach actually watching you row. If you are, you're going to spend a crapload of time working on your form.

Get used to spending time in the boat and on the water. Ergs are a useful tool for training, but unless you can get your hands on some of the really expensive and customized versions, they're not like a shell.

Get a good cardio base, both on sprints and duration.

fpr
08-19-2008, 11:03 PM
Thanks for all the responses. No, haven't started just yet, was just curious. I'm sure the coach has a well established routine for us. I've been using the concept 2 rowing machine at my gym.

J.C.
09-08-2008, 06:32 AM
Hello all you good people, I rowed throughout high school 5-7 days a week. We won many national events. Our coaches had competed in world championships. Some of the people I rowed with competed for the UK teams at junior level (don't know where they are now). Rowing is what got me into fitness and weightlifting and what made me sign up for WBB 4 years ago. I also rowed for the first couple of months of Uni then quit because the 6am starts sucked and because I'm so competitive that I secured a place in the 1st VIII whilst supposedly "just seeing whether I wanted to continue". I haven't been in a boat for years but I still absolutley love the sport.

My thoughts on this topic? first off my advice to fpr is that crossfit, general conditioning etc will help bring you up to speed. If you've never rowed before most of your time is is going to be spent learning how to row and how to balance before you even have a chance to effectively apply force in the boat. It won't be easy at first.

But my opinion on the debate about cross-training is:
ROW, ROW, ROW, ROW, then row some more etc etc. Ryuage is right. Kingjustin is (mostly) wrong.

From actually meeting some Olympian rowers and looking at schedules, they will spend about 80% of their time on the water, and most of the other 20% doing weight training. A very small amount will be spent on other forms of training. Most of that will be on rowing machines. The law of specificity basically states that to get good at an action you need to repeat that action a lot.

Some more evidence: I once found some crossfit table of fitness tests for strength, power, endurance etc. My rowing machine times at age 16 would have put me into the elite category whilst my my weights (and some running/cycling) would have placed me in only intermediate or less. I thought this was interesting/ridiculous because it shows how important technique is, how powerful you can become in specific things and also how unnecessary weight training can sometimes be. On the other hand, I reckon if we did more weight training than the pretty small amount we did, my numbers would have shot up.

When I left school, a new coach came in who increased the water time even more and decreased land traning. Apparently they stopped all weights. I disagree with this but it seems to have worked. The last few years I've heard they dominated and are consistently producing GB-team rowers despite being lighter than some other crews.

Rowing is such a good sport because its one of the few that requires both excellent strength and endurance. You wouldn't expect such big guys to do such long cardio workouts. At uni we did a 60min run once a week for instance; in a way it was pretty funny doing the monday night run as about 16, 6ft plus, 200pound men charged around the city as a group!