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canadianbuilder
12-03-2008, 11:42 PM
So I have been trying to cut down from 3 main meals/day to 6 smaller "meals" throughout the day.
The problem is I can't seem to do this. Throughout the day I can nibble on different snacks and have a small lunch, but by the evening I am hungry and usually over indulge to stop my cravings. I.e. I am hungry throughout the day, and at night I am overfull.

How do you guys/girls do it? The worst thing is how much I eat after 10:00 (when I get home from yoga).

Sugggestions?

WillNoble
12-03-2008, 11:58 PM
suck it up, your body will adjust in time...

KingWilder
12-04-2008, 06:19 AM
Why are you trying to go to 6 meals a day? The number of meals won't matter assuming you're hitting your desired calorie level.

anonymous1
12-04-2008, 09:09 AM
Yeah, stop splitting up your meals. Go back to 3 or 4. you're never eating enough to be satisfied, so you're not satisfied.

Athos
12-04-2008, 09:49 AM
I'm going to have to agree with WillNoble, your body will adjust. 6 small meals is better than 3 large ones for a variety of reasons. Your body gets a constant stream of nutrition while keeping your blood sugar level. Each time you eat you stimulate your metabolism, which burns more calories. Any nutritionist will tell you that smaller meals help you get more lean much better than fewer large meals. What has helped me most is finding foods that are low enough in calories that I can eat a larger volume of them, so I feel full. Some foods like peanut butter aren't such good choices, 2 tbsp is equal to a nice turkey sandwich. When I get cravings between feedings, I go to low calorie vegetables like celery, onion and peppers. Fry up some onion and peppers, they are super low-cal and actually taste great. Also I stay away from liquids with calories, that way I can eat more food to get my calories. It's just fine-tuning little things, but over time, it helps. The first 6 weeks of serious dieting was really hard on me, but after that time, my body got used to eating the smaller, more frequent meals and not it really isn't much trouble. I do give myself a cheat day once a week where I up my calories by 500-700, it boosts my metabolism and gives me a mental break.

anonymous1
12-04-2008, 10:19 AM
I'm going to have to agree with WillNoble, your body will adjust. 6 small meals is better than 3 large ones for a variety of reasons. Your body gets a constant stream of nutrition while keeping your blood sugar level. Each time you eat you stimulate your metabolism, which burns more calories. Any nutritionist will tell you that smaller meals help you get more lean much better than fewer large meals.

Generally good advice, but a couple of problems. The metabolism stimulation is from the actual macronutrients you are eating, each gram of protein/carbs/fat requires energy to digest. The amount of energy required does not vary based on how you split it up. Your metabolism is the same with 3 meals or 6. you will also be getting a steady stream of nutrients either way because the larger meals will just be broken down slower.

The only benefit to splitting up meals is that for some people (not me) it gives them more stable energy levels, and they feel better without a lot of food in their stomach at once.

It is solely a preference issue, so if canadian builder is having an easier time with 3 meals, he should eat 3 meals. It is stupid to make this more difficult than it needs to be.

KingWilder
12-04-2008, 02:08 PM
I'm going to have to agree with WillNoble, your body will adjust. 6 small meals is better than 3 large ones for a variety of reasons. Your body gets a constant stream of nutrition while keeping your blood sugar level. Each time you eat you stimulate your metabolism, which burns more calories. Any nutritionist will tell you that smaller meals help you get more lean much better than fewer large meals. What has helped me most is finding foods that are low enough in calories that I can eat a larger volume of them, so I feel full. Some foods like peanut butter aren't such good choices, 2 tbsp is equal to a nice turkey sandwich. When I get cravings between feedings, I go to low calorie vegetables like celery, onion and peppers. Fry up some onion and peppers, they are super low-cal and actually taste great. Also I stay away from liquids with calories, that way I can eat more food to get my calories. It's just fine-tuning little things, but over time, it helps. The first 6 weeks of serious dieting was really hard on me, but after that time, my body got used to eating the smaller, more frequent meals and not it really isn't much trouble. I do give myself a cheat day once a week where I up my calories by 500-700, it boosts my metabolism and gives me a mental break.

Nutritionists generally have no idea what the hell they're talking about either. They're still using "ideas" from like 20 years ago. MORE FREQUENT MEALS HAS ABSOLUTELY NO ADVANTAGE OVER LESS FREQUENCY. PERIOD. Now if you're talking in terms of will power...then yes, some people find it easier mentally to space out their calories. BUT don't confuse that to mean it's necessary.

I'll go ahead and post an article by Lyle McDonald:

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/research-review/meal-frequency-and-energy-balance-research-review.html#more-1389

Athos
12-04-2008, 03:07 PM
I agree about metabolism stimulation, that's why high-protein intake has such a high thermogenic effect. However, I would disagree that breaking it up is not beneficial. Metabolism naturally slows down during the afternoon and evening, which means that food has less of a thermogenic effect when eaten later in the day. By breaking up your meals across the entire day, you get more of a benefit across the hours. But even if that was negligible, there's still little doubt that you are better off getting protein/nutrition every three hours than every six hours. The body can only process so much protein at one time (estimates range between 30 and 60 grams across various studies) and is dependent upon the number of protein receptor binding sites available. The excess protein is wasted and excreted from the body. By breaking your meals up, you can help ensure more consumed protein is utilized and that your muscles have a constant flow of protein. See Matt Wenning's article from PLUSA three months back, he lays out a detailed case for how frequently one should eat and how much. The statement "you still get a steady stream of nutrients either way because a large meal is broken down slower", I'm not so sure that lines up with any experts in the field, I would love to see a cite for that information. Not only does over-consumption have a negative effect on your blood glucose levels, the aforementioned availability of receptor sites will dictate what the body actually uses. Moreover, when blood glucose levels spike and drop-off due to the glycemic consumption, your body will more readily store carbs as fats, this is especially true with high GI foods. Leading nutritional experts in the field recommend smaller, more frequent meals to avoid all of the problems I have raised. Anthony Ricciuto is a good example, he has won multiple powerlifting titles, he has the experience to back up his ideas. For every cite someone comes up with to support fewer meals, someone else can find ten that support more frequent meals. Please don't think I am criticizing anything said, if larger meals work for some, then they should keep with it. I know a lot of strong lifters who eat that way. I just believe that by approaching things a bit more scientifically, we can maximize our nutritional efforts.

PHILSTER
12-09-2008, 07:28 PM
MORE FREQUENT MEALS HAS ABSOLUTELY NO ADVANTAGE OVER LESS FREQUENCY. PERIOD.

Really? So if I eat one 2,000 calorie meal in the morning, as long as my will power holds out, there really isn't any disadvantage. Blood sugar, fatigue, etc...

This brings up another topic. Wouldn't that be detrimental to muscle rejuvenation? Lets say I eat this one meal in the morning and lets say that it is a high protein meal 100+ grams of protein (this is a ridiculous what if situation but stay with me) will my body really use all of that protein taken at once in the most efficient way or will some of it just end up being flushed through the system? I have a hard time understanding how there could be no disadvantage, aside from will power, from eating one large meal per day as opposed to numerous evenly placed meals.

Holto
12-09-2008, 08:28 PM
I agree about metabolism stimulation, that's why high-protein intake has such a high thermogenic effect. However, I would disagree that breaking it up is not beneficial. Metabolism naturally slows down during the afternoon and evening, which means that food has less of a thermogenic effect when eaten later in the day. By breaking up your meals across the entire day, you get more of a benefit across the hours. But even if that was negligible, there's still little doubt that you are better off getting protein/nutrition every three hours than every six hours. The body can only process so much protein at one time (estimates range between 30 and 60 grams across various studies) and is dependent upon the number of protein receptor binding sites available. The excess protein is wasted and excreted from the body. By breaking your meals up, you can help ensure more consumed protein is utilized and that your muscles have a constant flow of protein. See Matt Wenning's article from PLUSA three months back, he lays out a detailed case for how frequently one should eat and how much. The statement "you still get a steady stream of nutrients either way because a large meal is broken down slower", I'm not so sure that lines up with any experts in the field, I would love to see a cite for that information. Not only does over-consumption have a negative effect on your blood glucose levels, the aforementioned availability of receptor sites will dictate what the body actually uses. Moreover, when blood glucose levels spike and drop-off due to the glycemic consumption, your body will more readily store carbs as fats, this is especially true with high GI foods. Leading nutritional experts in the field recommend smaller, more frequent meals to avoid all of the problems I have raised. Anthony Ricciuto is a good example, he has won multiple powerlifting titles, he has the experience to back up his ideas. For every cite someone comes up with to support fewer meals, someone else can find ten that support more frequent meals. Please don't think I am criticizing anything said, if larger meals work for some, then they should keep with it. I know a lot of strong lifters who eat that way. I just believe that by approaching things a bit more scientifically, we can maximize our nutritional efforts.

It's good to read articles but it's also important to be up on current research. If eating more frequently increased metabolism, it would be dead easy to demonstrate this in a clinical setting. As of today, and study conducted on the matter has shown this to be untrue.

The human body adapts to factors that have a negative impact on survival. If the human body simply burnt more calories because it ate more frequently, it would seriously impair our ability to survive.

Consider that we've recently discovered that lactic acid gets recycled into pyruvate and you realize the body doesn't ever waste anything. It certainly would never arbitrarily decide to burn precious cals.

KingWilder
12-09-2008, 09:13 PM
MORE FREQUENT MEALS HAS ABSOLUTELY NO ADVANTAGE OVER LESS FREQUENCY. PERIOD.

Really? So if I eat one 2,000 calorie meal in the morning, as long as my will power holds out, there really isn't any disadvantage. Blood sugar, fatigue, etc...

This brings up another topic. Wouldn't that be detrimental to muscle rejuvenation? Lets say I eat this one meal in the morning and lets say that it is a high protein meal 100+ grams of protein (this is a ridiculous what if situation but stay with me) will my body really use all of that protein taken at once in the most efficient way or will some of it just end up being flushed through the system? I have a hard time understanding how there could be no disadvantage, aside from will power, from eating one large meal per day as opposed to numerous evenly placed meals.

That is an extreme example. I would point out that our bodies have not evolved much in the past few million years from our paleolithic ancestors. Meals were hard to come by and usually when something was found large quantities were eaten, oftentimes only having one meal a day...sometimes one meal for a couple days.

Look at some of the recent studies with people doing Intermittent Fasting who ONLY eat one or two meals a day (within a very small "eating window"). There don't appear to be many (if any at all) negative side effects to this type of eating.

More frequent meals = increased metabolism is an old way of thinking with little to no scientific backing that it's actually better than larger, less frequent meals.


calories in vs. calories out
no need to overcomplicate things

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
12-11-2008, 12:25 AM
It's good to read articles but it's also important to be up on current research. If eating more frequently increased metabolism, it would be dead easy to demonstrate this in a clinical setting. As of today, and study conducted on the matter has shown this to be untrue.

The human body adapts to factors that have a negative impact on survival. If the human body simply burnt more calories because it ate more frequently, it would seriously impair our ability to survive.

Consider that we've recently discovered that lactic acid gets recycled into pyruvate and you realize the body doesn't ever waste anything. It certainly would never arbitrarily decide to burn precious cals.I'm glad to see you're still posting here. :)

Holto
12-11-2008, 11:10 AM
I'm glad to see you're still posting here. :)

Resssssssspect.

jpw204
12-11-2008, 11:21 AM
MORE FREQUENT MEALS HAS ABSOLUTELY NO ADVANTAGE OVER LESS FREQUENCY. PERIOD.

Really? So if I eat one 2,000 calorie meal in the morning, as long as my will power holds out, there really isn't any disadvantage. Blood sugar, fatigue, etc...

This brings up another topic. Wouldn't that be detrimental to muscle rejuvenation? Lets say I eat this one meal in the morning and lets say that it is a high protein meal 100+ grams of protein (this is a ridiculous what if situation but stay with me) will my body really use all of that protein taken at once in the most efficient way or will some of it just end up being flushed through the system? I have a hard time understanding how there could be no disadvantage, aside from will power, from eating one large meal per day as opposed to numerous evenly placed meals.

I totally agree with this. I understand this is an extreme example, but, usings means/extremes is an effective way of breaking something down to the most basic level.

smalls
12-11-2008, 12:53 PM
I agree about metabolism stimulation, that's why high-protein intake has such a high thermogenic effect. However, I would disagree that breaking it up is not beneficial. Metabolism naturally slows down during the afternoon and evening, which means that food has less of a thermogenic effect when eaten later in the day. By breaking up your meals across the entire day, you get more of a benefit across the hours. But even if that was negligible, there's still little doubt that you are better off getting protein/nutrition every three hours than every six hours. The body can only process so much protein at one time (estimates range between 30 and 60 grams across various studies) and is dependent upon the number of protein receptor binding sites available. The excess protein is wasted and excreted from the body. By breaking your meals up, you can help ensure more consumed protein is utilized and that your muscles have a constant flow of protein. See Matt Wenning's article from PLUSA three months back, he lays out a detailed case for how frequently one should eat and how much. The statement "you still get a steady stream of nutrients either way because a large meal is broken down slower", I'm not so sure that lines up with any experts in the field, I would love to see a cite for that information. Not only does over-consumption have a negative effect on your blood glucose levels, the aforementioned availability of receptor sites will dictate what the body actually uses. Moreover, when blood glucose levels spike and drop-off due to the glycemic consumption, your body will more readily store carbs as fats, this is especially true with high GI foods. Leading nutritional experts in the field recommend smaller, more frequent meals to avoid all of the problems I have raised. Anthony Ricciuto is a good example, he has won multiple powerlifting titles, he has the experience to back up his ideas. For every cite someone comes up with to support fewer meals, someone else can find ten that support more frequent meals. Please don't think I am criticizing anything said, if larger meals work for some, then they should keep with it. I know a lot of strong lifters who eat that way. I just believe that by approaching things a bit more scientifically, we can maximize our nutritional efforts.

Athos, please post the referances to the research showing 30-60 grams of protein is some type of limit.

Oh, and go ahead and throw in where you learned that the HEALTHY human body exretes any substantial amount of protein EVER. Gluconeogenesis is a beautiful thing.


Really though, I would like the sources since you seem to insinuate you have read these studies.

smalls
12-11-2008, 01:05 PM
I totally agree with this. I understand this is an extreme example, but, usings means/extremes is an effective way of breaking something down to the most basic level.

LOL @ that being an extreme example. You guys have never had 100 grams of protein in a meal? Go freaking eat.

You peolpe do realize that gastric emptying can slow down right. And that the physical make up of the food you eat does influence how fast your body digest it.


I mean have none of you ever thrown up? Didnt you have food in your gut that you had eaten more than 3 hours ago? 5-6 hours etc?

Guess what, some of the protein you ate 3 hours ago is still in your stomach NOT your bloodstream by the time you eat ANOTHER meal, oh my gosh whatever will you do now you have 100 grams of protein in your stomach. And guess what, that doesnt mean your body is going to just flush that protein out (unless you have a number of severe diseases).

The healthy body does not waste any substantial amount of protein. You people need to read a ****in book instead of believing what other people tell you.

There are plenty of benefits to eating more frequent meals FOR SOME PEOPLE. But they are not necassary, they dont increase your metabolism any more than the same amount of calories is less meals and they dont increase your bodies absorption of protein.