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mosley1990
12-21-2008, 07:04 PM
Can someone please explain the difference between complex and simple carbs for me? and which are "good" ones?

anonymous1
12-21-2008, 09:44 PM
This would be better off done as a google search. It's your responsibility to learn.

Unreal
12-22-2008, 07:59 AM
Simple are single chain carbs, complex are more then one sugar molecule linked together.

Good or bad depends on what you want and your diet needs. Simple are good for quickly raising blood sugar levels, and pre and post workout nutrition. Complex are good for sustained energy and slower releasing sugar to the blood stream.

mosley1990
12-22-2008, 10:57 PM
Thanks for the help Unreal...and to you anonymous...sure, i could have searched but whats wrong with asking someone on the forum? i see nothing wrong with it.

jAy_Dub
12-22-2008, 11:39 PM
Like unreal said, simple is good for post workout. If you ever crave sugary foods like dessert or candy, post workout is the best time to eat them. The rest of the time I would try and stick with complex carbs.

anonymous1
12-23-2008, 09:29 PM
Thanks for the help Unreal...and to you anonymous...sure, i could have searched but whats wrong with asking someone on the forum? i see nothing wrong with it.

Nothing wrong with it, I just thought you'd find better information on google and based on these replies I am right. You win though because you can do both! The search people bug me too. my bad.

Ben Moore
12-23-2008, 11:00 PM
Nothing wrong with it, I just thought you'd find better information on google and based on these replies I am right. You win though because you can do both! The search people bug me too. my bad.

What exactly was wrong with these replies?

Kenny Croxdale
12-24-2008, 08:55 AM
Can someone please explain the difference between complex and simple carbs for me? and which are "good" ones?

Unreal gave you some good information. However, it gets a bit more confusing and complicated.

Carbohydrates are also have a glycemic index rating. The higher the index rating, the faster the carbohydrates are absorbed.

High glycemic index foods elevate you insulin level. One of the good characteristics of insulin is that it is an anabolic hormone. That means insulin promostes muscle growth.

So, as Unreal stated, consuming some type of high glycemic index carbohydrte before, during and after your workout stops catabolism (muscle break down) and promote anabolism (muscle growth/recovery).

However, insulin has a dark side. When high glycemic index foods are consumed outside the "Workout Zone", it shuts down the body fat buring process. The calories consumed at that point are stored as body fat.

The best time to consume high glycemic index foods is during the "Workout Zone".

When low glycemic index foods are consumed, they counter hormone to insulin is released, glucagon. Part of glucagon's role is to burn body fat for fuel.

An example of high glycemic index foods are carrots, potatos, bananas, etc. Low glycemic index foods are broccoli, green beans, pinto beans, peachers, etc

Meats and fats don't raise insulin. Fibereous food also slow down the release of insulin.

Thus, when eating a high glycemic index carbohydrate you can dramatically slow down absorption (lower the insulin respones) by consuming meat that has some fat and a fiberous food like broccoli.

Think of it in numbers. Let say the top of the glycemic index is 10.

Your potato is 10, Chicken is 0 and broccli is 2. Now add them up.

10 + 2 + 0 = 11. Then divide them by the 3 foods you have eaten (potato, chicken, and broccoli).

12 divided by 3 = 4.

4 is fairly low on the glycemic index chart. It means that your very little insulin is being released by your body. That means those calories are less likely to be store as body fat.

For more information check out:
The Glycemic Index
By David Mendosa
http://www.mendosa.com/gi.htm

Kenny Croxdale

Reko
12-24-2008, 09:13 AM
What exactly was wrong with these replies?

They don't spend every wakign minute of their lives high, so they don't have any validation becuase they just don't know, man.

anonymous1
12-24-2008, 10:22 AM
No bad advice, just not complete. If you really want to learn about something, you have to research it yourself and it takes time and some intelligence. These are just very basic answers, but decent ones. Good enough depending on how much you value information and if you are ok with relying on others to tell you what to do.

aaronm
12-31-2008, 06:38 PM
after doing some research on my own, i think i understand the pros and cons of simple and complex carbs. i guess my main question is when utilizing the high glycemic carbs during/post work out, what is an optimal ammount? If I simply mix a few scoops of whey in a Powerade would that be sufficient, or should i actively be seeking whole foods?

might be a stupid question, but carbs have always confused the hell out of me.

anonymous1
01-01-2009, 09:05 AM
There is no magic number, it is based on your daily calorie intake and what exactly you're trying to do. For most people, this amounts to 50-100g. You'd ideally be looking for non-whole foods immediately after your workout, then 30-60 minutes later a small whole food meal.

I'm a big proponent of eating half of your calories very close to workout. A small meal 30-60 minutes before, a drink with whey and simple carbs during or immediately after, then a whole food meal.