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irockj00ssockz
12-31-2008, 10:09 PM
My last thread was deleted, have no clue why, though.

Anywho, I need a routine for baseball lifting, I can work in my cardio... I'd like to work everyday (cardio counts)

thanks in advance

ps I'd like to still look good too lo l ;)

XFacta82
01-01-2009, 07:53 AM
This is mine...

Monday - Chest/ Triceps
Tuesday - Legs/ Forearms
Wednesday - Medicine Ball Workout
Thursday - Back/ Biceps
Friday - Legs/ Lower Back

geoffsherman
01-04-2009, 09:45 AM
What position(s) do you play?

cwoodrb105
01-04-2009, 11:39 AM
It would help if you'd tell us if you're a power hitter, or working on just connecting with the ball and looking for a high batting average.

irockj00ssockz
01-06-2009, 06:47 AM
I play ss, pitcher, and some catcher (meh).

There were 22 games last year and I hit 12 doubles.

I'm not slow, though.

I'm pretty over all lean, still have some power, and really I think I need some more power.

cwoodrb105
01-06-2009, 02:48 PM
To get power in hitting, really make sure you bench, military press, and do some stuff to help out your hip area also. Other then that, I'd ask your coach for a real routine to do for your position. If you're looking to get more powerful though, make sure to work your chest, shoulders, and legs. Squats will help.

XFacta82
01-06-2009, 05:16 PM
Try a medicine ball routine to work your core. The core is essential in rotation through the hitting zone and you will see your power increase and you will be hitting frozen ropes easier than ever.

geoffsherman
01-09-2009, 05:40 PM
I would recommend staying away from any overhead pressing and limit bench pressing as well. The reason is two fold (1) you want to limit the stress oon your RC and shoulder joint in general (2) adding too much muscle in these areas will begin to limit your range of motion, which for those positions is bad. I would recommend a program like DeFrancos WS4SB. For your upper ME work, I would focus on chins and pullups. You can do some bench pressing, but I would focus on dumbbells rather than a barbell. I would also incorporate grip work on your upper days as building forearms is very important as I am sure you know. While you are offseason, I would shoot for 4 days, when you move into preseason cut down to 3 days, and then when you are in season, depending on your schedule, you might do 1-2 full body workouts. On your 4 day offseason, I would do 1-2 upper days and 2 lower days. You really need to build a solid base. On your secondary upper day, I would focus on forearm, core, and shoulder mobility work. If you want some details, feel free to PM me.

BrainDed
02-04-2009, 11:56 AM
Try a medicine ball routine to work your core. The core is essential in rotation through the hitting zone and you will see your power increase and you will be hitting frozen ropes easier than ever.

I don't know diddly about lifting, yet, but I do know baseball. All your power in a swing comes from your Bum and your core. It's all about bat speed, how fast can you get that bat through the zone. Bassically, you need to explode through the strike zone. That comes from opening up your hips and transferring your weight from back to front.

Again, just a newb for lifting, but i would think the type of training needed would be short quick bursts, for that explosion needed. In other words, being able to do crunches for 10 minutes straight wouldnt hurt, but moving a heavy weight side to side 3 times, really fast, would be better. In my humble opinion.

Mr. MAXX
02-05-2009, 07:27 PM
I would not follow a bodybuilding style split routine like xfacta posted. Instead look for a program specifically designed for athletes. You can find the programs that I use with college baseball and softball players here: www.maxxtraining.com/stp.htm

Keep in mind that the programs shown there are basic templates. I use individualized programs with my team.

XFacta82
02-05-2009, 07:57 PM
I would not follow a bodybuilding style split routine like xfacta posted. Instead look for a program specifically designed for athletes. You can find the programs that I use with college baseball and softball players here: www.maxxtraining.com/stp.htm

Keep in mind that the programs shown there are basic templates. I use individualized programs with my team.

Whats wrong with that type of workout? Not saying you are wrong...just wondering

Southern Beast
02-05-2009, 08:41 PM
I said this in another thread, but as a former baseball player (and a damn good one, I might add!), really focus on your fundamentals. I developed a good stretching routine to stay very limber in my upperbody and core, so I could really swing all the way through. Do a lot of repetitions with a weighted bat sleeve from both a left and right handed position.

No matter what my peak conditioning was strength wise, the best improvements I ever had in regards to my hitting came from a vigorous stretching routine and really working on my bat speed from both right/left hand positions. Maybe I'm just a freak, and I doubt it'll be everyone's key to sluggin', but it doesn't hurt.

We focused a lot on dumbbell work, particularly hitting the back, shoulders, and tri's. We did woodchoppers with medicine balls and cables to really dial in the core, and tons of 60 yard sprints.

Southern Beast
02-05-2009, 08:43 PM
Oh yeah, lots of barbell lunges, too, for the wheels. I forgot about those again!

Adam M
02-07-2009, 09:49 PM
Damn dude you only played 22 games? Well if you catch no doubt work on your legs. I am a full time catcher and on my leg workout day I do Squats,Deadlifts,Hamstring Curls

You should do a Push/Pull/Legs Routine....that's what I do and I love it.

Hazerboy
02-15-2009, 04:25 PM
what is your best bench, squat, and deadlift? its going to be much easier to help you if you post these.

've never played baseball competitively but I wrestled all four years in high school and know a little about strength training for sports.

First, learn how to properly perform all the lifts - the squat, bench, deadilft, rows, etc. Too often I see baseball players in my gym doing nothing but curls and forearm workouts. You swing a bat and throw a ball with your ENTIRE BODY, a 400 lb squat or 500 lb deadlift is going to help you exponentially more than another 1/2 inch or your bicep or forearm.

Once you know the lifts well, go to defrancostraining.com and use any one of his routines- all of his westside for skinny bastard routines are good. They're all designed for athletes and will tremendously help your speed and strength. This guy knows what he's talking about. Keep in mind though that Defranco has a tendancy to make things little complicated (he has too -- he trains mostly advanced athletes) so when in doubt, keep things simple.

Gain 20 lbs of muscle. You're probably too skinny. If you're worried about "slowing down," keep in mind the multitude of NFL, college, and probably even high school football palyers that are faster than you and 70 lbs heavier.

Up to a certain point, getting stronger isn't going to help your game much (unless your an elite level athlete, i.e. a pro). Some general numbers to shoot for are a 1.5x bodyweight bench, 2x body weight squat, and a 2.5 x deadlift. Once you can nail these all you need to worry about is your form and technique (which you should be working concurrently anyways).

Next,


I would recommend staying away from any overhead pressing and limit bench pressing as well. The reason is two fold (1) you want to limit the stress on your RC and shoulder joint in general (2) adding too much muscle in these areas will begin to limit your range of motion, which for those positions is bad.

I think this is kind of bull****. Maybe you want to limit whatever shoulder work your doing in the in season (especially if you're a pitcher or something) but unless you have insanely massive arms (LIKE THIS GUY: http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/askville/6666639_10230598_mywrite/greg4.jpg ) you're not going to be limited in your ROM if you get bigger arms. Hell, Ronnie Coleman, 280 lbs multi olympia winner, can do the full splits even with his tree trunk size legs. Muscle in and of itself does not limit your range of motion unless your walking around with two softballs for shoulders - then the muscle will physically get in the way during a ROM. Just make sure you stretch a lot (look on defranco's site, i'm sure he has some good stretches for baseball players. I think its under "flexible shoulders" or "healthy shoulders" or something ).

As for shoulder excercises putting "too much" stress on your shoulders, I think as long as you don't train too hard in the "in season" you'll be fine. I would think that you would want to strengthen any weaknesses you have in the off season anyways. Just make sure your working all ranges of motion (Overhead press, dips, bench, rows, chinups, etc). so you don't get any muscle imbalances. If it hurts from a preexisting baseball injury, don't do it.

like I said, I don't have any baseball experience, but I really don't think statements like "don't work your shoulders cause you play baseball and you'll get injured" hold any water. In fact, I think its statements like this that get people injured. From pitching all day, you get a huge muscle imbalance in your shoulder. You need to work the antagonistic muscle groups, which is done through rowing, chinning, probably even OH pressing and benching. Just make sure your bench form is how it should be.

Thats it.

VDubb
02-17-2009, 09:44 AM
I think this is kind of bull****. Maybe you want to limit whatever shoulder work your doing in the in season (especially if you're a pitcher or something) but unless you have insanely massive arms (LIKE THIS GUY: http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/askville/6666639_10230598_mywrite/greg4.jpg ) you're not going to be limited in your ROM if you get bigger arms. Hell, Ronnie Coleman, 280 lbs multi olympia winner, can do the full splits even with his tree trunk size legs. Muscle in and of itself does not limit your range of motion unless your walking around with two softballs for shoulders - then the muscle will physically get in the way during a ROM. Just make sure you stretch a lot (look on defranco's site, i'm sure he has some good stretches for baseball players. I think its under "flexible shoulders" or "healthy shoulders" or something ).

As for shoulder excercises putting "too much" stress on your shoulders, I think as long as you don't train too hard in the "in season" you'll be fine. I would think that you would want to strengthen any weaknesses you have in the off season anyways. Just make sure your working all ranges of motion (Overhead press, dips, bench, rows, chinups, etc). so you don't get any muscle imbalances. If it hurts from a preexisting baseball injury, don't do it.

like I said, I don't have any baseball experience, but I really don't think statements like "don't work your shoulders cause you play baseball and you'll get injured" hold any water. In fact, I think its statements like this that get people injured. From pitching all day, you get a huge muscle imbalance in your shoulder. You need to work the antagonistic muscle groups, which is done through rowing, chinning, probably even OH pressing and benching. Just make sure your bench form is how it should be.

Thats it.

I've played ball for a LONG time, and agree with you. I had always been told the same thing, and as a pitcher, it made some sense to me that getting "bulky" could limit movement and/or negatively affect my pitching.

However, now that I'm older (and hopefully wiser) I feel that the strength I could've gained by lifting more back in the day, would've helped more than hindered.

As long as you're not overdoing it on overhead pressing movements, I think that the strength gained outweighs the potential for injury (which is inherant for any athlete, in any sport, during any lift). Don't exclude these lifts simply because you're playing baseball.

Hit it hard!!

Mercuryblade
02-18-2009, 03:10 PM
Step 1: Put down baseball bat
Step 2: Grow balls
Step 3: Play lacrosse.

I keed, I keed...

VDubb
02-19-2009, 02:15 PM
Step 1: Put down baseball bat
Step 2: Grow balls
Step 3: Play lacrosse.

I keed, I keed...

hehe.....

Take off your pads and helmet, put on a leather glove, walk 50ft away, lob softballs at me, and attempt to field the frozen ropes I hit at you........... ;)

(There's a reason pitchers at the upper levels of softball will sometimes wear helmets!!)

I wish Lacrosse would've been more popular when I was in HS......my schools now have teams.........

geoffsherman
02-23-2009, 05:22 PM
Let me clarify a few things:
a) I think if you were to do overhead pressing, I would stay away from barbell work because it doesn't allow your shoulders to rotate like dumbbells do
b) I really like medicine ball throws (with two arms) because they build explosive strength and work the core
c) I get concerned with repetitive overhead anything because many sports that require overhead movements (i.e. volleyball, baseball) end up with athletes who have RC tendonitis