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Darracq
01-01-2009, 01:50 PM
On another site peple were saying box squat could hurt your back and casues spinal compression and so on, what are you toughts on this, I said as long as you dont just fall to the box you should be ok,there about the only squats i do. sorry i

lenny spero
01-01-2009, 03:47 PM
all squats are going to cause some sort of spinal compression if your squatting heavy enough..

pie zar
01-01-2009, 04:32 PM
just dont slam yourself down on the box when squating and you shouldnt notice any spinal compression.

Butcher
01-01-2009, 05:15 PM
Your spine is being supported by your pelvis. Your pelvis can be either supported by your legs or a box. It isnt going to change the compression on your spine.

Hazerboy
01-01-2009, 06:17 PM
Lets say your squatting 200 lbs. To support this weight, your pelvis has to supply an upward force of 200 lbs or else it will crush you (a bit simplified). This force is spread evenly throughout your spine. If you box squat this same weight, your pelvis still has to supply 200 lbs of force regardless of whether or not there is a box there. This force is still spread evenly throughout your spine.

The difference is impulse can be different. see wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impulse On a box, your change in motion (from descent to ascent) can happen much faster if you bounce off the box or don't slow down the same way you do when you free squat. Impulse is what breaks bones, its the difference between a push and punch assuming the force behind each is the same.

Basically this is a real complicated way of saying don't slam yourself on the box. there won't be any more spinal compression for a box squat as long as your descent is the same (which is should be) and you don't slam yourself on the box. The force is exactly the same.

Darracq
01-01-2009, 06:44 PM
Keep them coming, does anyone have any research on this.

johnnyo_99
01-01-2009, 06:59 PM
don't round your back and just tap the box while in the hole. there will always be compression after squatting, just hang from a chinup bar for a while to stretch out your spine afterward.

Tom Mutaffis
01-02-2009, 09:17 AM
Keep them coming, does anyone have any research on this.

Hazerboy gave you your answer.

Why are you worried about spinal compression? Have you previously been injured?

I would seek the advice of a medical professional if you are looking for research studies or more comprehensive information. Just realize that their advice will probably not be what you are looking for since many heath professionals do not condone heavy training.

Darracq
01-02-2009, 09:48 AM
Hazerboy gave you your answer.

Why are you worried about spinal compression? Have you previously been injured?

I would seek the advice of a medical professional if you are looking for research studies or more comprehensive information. Just realize that their advice will probably not be what you are looking for since many heath professionals do not condone heavy training.

I am not worried about it, i am just trying to show some guys some proff, i guess i shouldnt really care.

mastermonster
01-03-2009, 08:55 PM
I'd have to say there is at least some extra potential for added compression from the "Louie Simmons" type box squat (total deload to the box). Without the box or just a light touch (my choice), there is the 'shock absorber' effect of the knees and even the hip joints. Is it enough to be more dangerous than regular squat? I doubt it unless, as mentioned; you slam down on the box. My problem with deloaded box squats is that it in no way is similar to your competition squat and it's just more to 'unlearn' in my opinion. But that's just my train of thought. If you like them and feel they benefit you, I'd say do them. I could see them being more of a benefit to the deadlift than the squat since it reinacts the start of the deadlift more than any part of the comp squat, with the deadlift starting from a dead 'static' start.

Pitbull3291
01-04-2009, 07:31 PM
Box squat in my opinion is pointless when you can just squat, its less weight on your back and you get a better exercise, why hurt your back sitting on a box with 500lbs when you can just do 300 regular squating

Lones Green
01-04-2009, 07:39 PM
Box squat in my opinion is pointless when you can just squat, its less weight on your back and you get a better exercise, why hurt your back sitting on a box with 500lbs when you can just do 300 regular squating

Please don't post about that which you do not have the knowledge to post about. You obviously have no idea what you are saying.

beastman2009
01-05-2009, 12:02 AM
I agree there will always be compression no matter what. Reverse hyper is the solution, those people on the other boards just dont know how to box squat, and probally squat 200 pounds!

IvanDrago
01-05-2009, 12:08 AM
I'm pretty sure it was McGill's research that showed that sitting versus standing creates a 10x increase in intervertebral disk pressure. It may not intuitively make sense, but imagine this. You two big cushions in your legs, do you think your spine is going to receive more or less pressure if you remove the supporting factors? Tightness is also key to keeping a healthy spine when exposed to heavy loads. Sitting tends to make people relax more. Less tension + heavy weight = bad news bears. Also, the action of touching the box tends to rotate your pelvis, messing your the posture of your lumbar vertebrae mid squat. Something to consider.

As someone who has had the misfortune of having back issues, I can say with experience that there is a difference on my spine. I can't speak for others.

That being said, I don't think it is a problem as long as you aren't abusing it. Good form on an appropriate height box is way different than slamming down (creating impulse on the spine as mentioned above) onto a 24" box with 200lbs over what you can actually handle in a parallel free squat for max reps. If you are a sufferer of back injuries, I would take a good deal of caution. I have heard others say substituting chain suspended free squats is a good alternative to box squatting if injury is or becomes a concern. Different, but a similar idea at least, and the risk of injury is less. I have never done them however. I don't own the rack at the gym nor do I own a pair rack savers from spud inc if i were inclined to try it at the gym. My home rack is vulcan style. meh.

I believe Louie Simmons said something to the effect of no completely safe exercise is effective.

As a qualifier, I consider a box squat to be something that actually incorporates the box. Using a "light touch" as I understand it is how a lot of people use the box as a depth guide, it does not alter the squat from a standard free squat at all.

coldfire
01-05-2009, 02:02 PM
This:

You are speaking about things you've never tried and don't understand. And you didn't even have a good explanation for your claim.

Reko
01-05-2009, 02:20 PM
Box squat in my opinion is pointless when you can just squat, its less weight on your back and you get a better exercise, why hurt your back sitting on a box with 500lbs when you can just do 300 regular squating

Box squat in my opinion is very useful as it has added many many pounds to my squat fairly consistantly I might add. I will also say that the way I do it (be it right or wrong - see what I just wrote above) uses less weight than my free squat and, IMO, causes less potential issues than using more weight. It has worked for me, I like them a lot.






(that better?)

geoffsherman
01-05-2009, 05:24 PM
Interesting perspective, see 3rd question: http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/question_of_strength_vol_48

Reko
01-05-2009, 05:40 PM
I don't think they are that dangerous as long as you don't drop to the box and remain in control. Most people in commercial gyms do them incorrectly (touch and go to a free standing bench). Those people should not be doing them, or at least get a little more coaching.

mastermonster
01-05-2009, 10:34 PM
I agree there will always be compression no matter what. Reverse hyper is the solution, those people on the other boards just dont know how to box squat, and probally squat 200 pounds!

I totally agree with the reverse hypers as compression therapy!

shields
01-06-2009, 08:18 AM
the key is to tea bag the box. that is arch your lower back and try to place your nuts on the box. then slam your head into the bar, push your abs out hard and contract you glutes and you should almost jump off of the box.

also the foam on the box is great if you are worried about hitting to hard.

if done wrong any exercise is dangerous.

our gym has had lots of luck with box squats of all types.