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View Full Version : Excess Cal Needed to Gain 1 Lb of Muscle?



Puddle_Pirate
01-19-2009, 11:04 PM
can't seem to find a definititve ans.....???

whiteman90909
01-19-2009, 11:18 PM
http://letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=Calories+pound+of+fat

Puddle_Pirate
01-19-2009, 11:26 PM
http://letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=Calories+pound+of+fat
Sorry, I guess I should of been more specific. I know that 3500 cal make up 1 Lb of fat, but how many cal make up 1 Lb of muscle. Muscles make up a diff. energy content.

I've heard of diff. figures thrown around like 2500, 700, 1000, etc. but have never gotten the straight facts....?

whiteman90909
01-20-2009, 09:18 PM
Sorry, I guess I should of been more specific. I know that 3500 cal make up 1 Lb of fat, but how many cal make up 1 Lb of muscle. Muscles make up a diff. energy content.

I've heard of diff. figures thrown around like 2500, 700, 1000, etc. but have never gotten the straight facts....?

Probably because all muscles are different in their makeup and purpose, so it will vary from muscle to muscle.

Masako
01-20-2009, 09:40 PM
I think something like this would be pretty difficult to answer, but if someone has something more definitive I would be interested in hearing it as well. http://photosnag.com/img/1927/y08m1110mhmd/2.gif

king8329
01-20-2009, 10:05 PM
Read a book once by Tom Venuto (I believe, its been awhile) that said 1lb of muscle consists of 600 calories and the rest (70%) is water. Havent seen actual case studies though.

Unreal
01-21-2009, 07:49 AM
Plus that doesn't take into account the caloric needs to build new tissue.

Holto
01-21-2009, 09:57 AM
Since muscle is 70% water, it yields very little energy to the body when catabolized. Lyle McDonald estimates ~600 cals.

The general answer to your question is 2500 cals. This is a classic example of a situation where guys like Rhodes tell us not to over think things. Focus on your daily caloric intake. If you're gaining fat too fast for your liking, ease off a bit.

rainjack
01-21-2009, 10:25 AM
Since muscle is 70% water, it yields very little energy to the body when catabolized. Lyle McDonald estimates ~600 cals.

The general answer to your question is 2500 cals. This is a classic example of a situation where guys like Rhodes tell us not to over think things. Focus on your daily caloric intake. If you're gaining fat too fast for your liking, ease off a bit.

I wouldn't even worry about daily intake that much. Your weight can vary several pounds from one day to the next.

Take it in 1 week, or 2 week intervals. Check your diet and your weight every week or 2. Make adjustments then, like you said, don't sweat the minutia.

Holto
01-21-2009, 12:42 PM
I wouldn't even worry about daily intake that much. Your weight can vary several pounds from one day to the next.

Take it in 1 week, or 2 week intervals. Check your diet and your weight every week or 2. Make adjustments then, like you said, don't sweat the minutia.

I made reference to his daily energy intake, not his weight.

Puddle_Pirate
01-22-2009, 04:19 AM
Since muscle is 70% water, it yields very little energy to the body when catabolized. Lyle McDonald estimates ~600 cals.

The general answer to your question is 2500 cals. This is a classic example of a situation where guys like Rhodes tell us not to over think things. Focus on your daily caloric intake. If you're gaining fat too fast for your liking, ease off a bit.
lol...simplicity is prob. the best key

rainjack
01-22-2009, 06:44 AM
I made reference to his daily energy intake, not his weight.

And I said not to focus on it every day. Are you seriously suggesting that diet is not part of the game when someone is trying to gain muscle? Really?

I'd like to see some studies cited where weight and diet were proven to be unrelated.

anonymous1
01-22-2009, 09:29 AM
If you are training progressively and consistently with the big compound lifts, and eating enough to be gaining 1lb/week without obvious fat gain, you're at your number. Just take a month to figure this out, gradually add calories and weight yourself in the AM after the same day of eating and you'll know exactly what the number is for your specific body.

Brad08
01-22-2009, 09:55 AM
Aren't you the 115 lb. guy?

Don't worry about how many calories it takes to gain a pound of muscle. Just start eating and make that scale move.

BFGUITAR
01-22-2009, 01:55 PM
No clue. A good way to find out is to cut out lb of bicep and burn it and measure how much heat it releases. That way you can find how many calories it's made of. Enjoy.

Holto
01-23-2009, 12:18 PM
And I said not to focus on it every day. Are you seriously suggesting that diet is not part of the game when someone is trying to gain muscle? Really?

I'd like to see some studies cited where weight and diet were proven to be unrelated.

We're just getting our wires crossed.

You said not to worry about what you weigh every day. I'm telling him to focus on his daily energy intake (diet) and tweak it up or down until the desired weight gain is occurring.

platypus
01-24-2009, 12:20 AM
Aren't you the 115 lb. guy?

Don't worry about how many calories it takes to gain a pound of muscle. Just start eating and make that scale move.

just write this in every thread he makes.