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METAL VIPER
01-20-2009, 12:48 PM
Hello,

I just underwent open-heart surgery after having congenital aortic stenosis; I went with a mechanical replacement valve. Well after surgery, the doctor told me that I would have to limit my weight lifting significantly. I can't find any answers from doctors, because they don't know anything about training and speak in absolutes (I was told lifting 50lbs for more reps would get me just as strong as 300 for a few, it would just take more time...)

Any help is appreciated; I'm hoping someone here may have a similar experience or knowledge on the subject. Thanks

Ben Moore
01-20-2009, 12:56 PM
Have you gotten any info from a PT? I would think that with that type of surgery you would be referred to one.

METAL VIPER
01-20-2009, 01:06 PM
No, I haven't spoken with one. I'm just wondering what the consequences will be - like sudden death, or slow deterioration

Sean S
01-20-2009, 01:24 PM
The potential problem I see could be either damaging the valve itself of having the valve come loose. I don't know exactly what kind of pressures those things can withstand. I would be more concerned with the valve coming loose from its anchoring. Without an aortic valve in place to prevent backflow into the left ventricle, the ventricle would likely not be able to fill and eject blood with any kind efficiency. I could imagine a situation like this causing death relatively quickly.
Disclaimer: My background is in basic cardiovascular physiology and in anatomy. Thus I don't know exactly what materials are in replacement valves or how they anchor them in the aorta. If it were me, I wouldn't do any heavy lifting until I got some very clear answers to these questions from a cardiothoracic surgeon and/or someone who has had an identical surgery.

METAL VIPER
01-20-2009, 01:38 PM
Thanks a lot, I appreciate the response. As far as I know, I have a St. Jude mechanical valve which is made of titanium, but I don't know how it is anchored in.

Sean S
01-20-2009, 01:53 PM
Thanks a lot, I appreciate the response. As far as I know, I have a St. Jude mechanical valve which is made of titanium, but I don't know how it is anchored in.

I don't really see you being able to damage something made of titanium, but I would try to get a better idea of how it is anchored. I would also make sure there's nothing else that we're not thinking of that could cause problems.

METAL VIPER
01-20-2009, 02:12 PM
I don't really see you being able to damage something made of titanium, but I would try to get a better idea of how it is anchored. I would also make sure there's nothing else that we're not thinking of that could cause problems.
Will do. I go to the surgeon on Monday for a post-op. I'll be sure to bring a list of questions and then relay them back here. Once again, thanks a lot for your help, strength training is what I live for and I can't even think of not doing it.

DrDudley-Robey
01-20-2009, 06:12 PM
Ask you MD to send you to Cardiac Rehab. They can work with you on an exercise program based on your Surg, current status and MD rec

Pangers
01-24-2009, 11:01 PM
I can understand how you feel when you say "strength training is what you live for." Begining some 40 years ago as a 130lb. high school freshman who was getting the ***** kicked out of him playing football until a year ago, I lived and breathed training. In July of 07 I started having pain in my left tricept. (And it wasn't from nose breakers either). In early November 07 I had a heart attack. I got a stent and a week in the hospital. A couple of weeks later I was feeling much better and resumed training. Pretty easy stuff at first but with in no time I was close to PRs again. In March 07 another heart attack and 3 stents. But pretty much the same results. 2-3 weeks post procedure and back to training. (Actualy this time I felt the best I had felt in years.) In July 07, you guessed it another one, plus another in September. This time I got an ICD implanted in my chest. What this does is shock the ***** out of you if it doesn't think your heart is beating correctly. (That really sucks and I wouldn't wish it on anyone).
All I'm trying to say is be very very careful. Pay very close attention to what your body is telling you. The doctors I have spoken with have been little to no help. There doesn't seem to be any studies about these type of things. I know this has been rather lengthy but if there is anything at all I can help you with please let me know.

METAL VIPER
01-26-2009, 05:35 PM
I can understand how you feel when you say "strength training is what you live for." Begining some 40 years ago as a 130lb. high school freshman who was getting the ***** kicked out of him playing football until a year ago, I lived and breathed training. In July of 07 I started having pain in my left tricept. (And it wasn't from nose breakers either). In early November 07 I had a heart attack. I got a stent and a week in the hospital. A couple of weeks later I was feeling much better and resumed training. Pretty easy stuff at first but with in no time I was close to PRs again. In March 07 another heart attack and 3 stents. But pretty much the same results. 2-3 weeks post procedure and back to training. (Actualy this time I felt the best I had felt in years.) In July 07, you guessed it another one, plus another in September. This time I got an ICD implanted in my chest. What this does is shock the ***** out of you if it doesn't think your heart is beating correctly. (That really sucks and I wouldn't wish it on anyone).
All I'm trying to say is be very very careful. Pay very close attention to what your body is telling you. The doctors I have spoken with have been little to no help. There doesn't seem to be any studies about these type of things. I know this has been rather lengthy but if there is anything at all I can help you with please let me know.
Holy **** man, that's some serious tenacity to keep going. I'm at the age where I'm young and just don't care, so I just want to say **** it and push it, but if it does something, I just want to go out...I don't want to be sidelined by something worse happening. I can't wait to lift anything heavier than a gallon of milk. Good luck with everything man

Pangers
02-01-2009, 09:52 PM
Metal Viper


Because you are young you should care. You can still control your destiney. Don't let your condition frustrate you.
If you push it to early or hard you may in deed "go out." But not all the way out. It's never quite that easy.
Just take it slow and easy. One day at a time. The longer you go without a set back the stronger you will become.
I know it is easy to become discouraged. Let me help in some way. I sure you have much to offer. It just takes time.

METAL VIPER
02-02-2009, 11:25 AM
Metal Viper


Because you are young you should care. You can still control your destiney. Don't let your condition frustrate you. If you push it to early or hard you may in deed "go out." But not all the way out. It's never quite that easy.
Just take it slow and easy. One day at a time. The longer you go without a set back the stronger you will become.
I know it is easy to become discouraged. Let me help in some way. I sure you have much to offer. It just takes time.
I don't have a problem waiting until I'm totally healed; even when I'm fully recovered, the doctors are telling me I can't lift anything over 150 - ever. That's just unacceptable for me; I can't do it. I know doctors are overcautious, be it fear of lawsuits or general lack of knowledge on the subject. I just don't want my future in lifting dictated by someone who doesn't even know a lot about it.

Thank you for the kind words and advice; I appreciate it

lynnlynn7
02-02-2009, 09:36 PM
I have a PL teammate who underwent very similar surgery last year. I'll check with him and see if he has any insight.

METAL VIPER
02-03-2009, 05:48 PM
I have a PL teammate who underwent very similar surgery last year. I'll check with him and see if he has any insight.
MUCH APPRECIATED!

I look forward to hearing what he has to say