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View Full Version : Hopelessly confused about diet!



numbersix
01-29-2009, 05:16 PM
Hi guys,

Iíve been working out for exactly a year now but since I am a textbook skinny guy who had never worked out before I still think of myself as a beginner. Although I have kept to my programs religiously and barely missed a session (I train 3 times a week), I havenít really made anything like the same gains as some other guys at my gym.

Obviously, I appreciate that everyone is different and that some people find it harder to put on muscle than others but I feel that what is holding me back is my diet. Everywhere I read and everyone I speak to gives me different, often contradictory advice on what I should be eating.

I am 34 yrs old, 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) tall and weigh 64.4 kg (142 pounds) with 15.6% body fat. To give you some idea of what I lift, I bench press 20 kg (44 pounds) on each arm using dumbbells; use 12.4 kg (27.5 pounds) dumbbells for bicep curls and deadlift 45 kg (99 pounds). I drink whey protein shakes made with skimmed milk.

I workout 3 times a week, focusing on different muscle groups each day. Unfortunately, I am really only able to train at the end of the day, between about 8 and 10 pm so Iím particularly unsure as to what I should be eating afterwards so late at night.

Iíd really appreciate your guidance on what I should be eating. How much protein? How much carbs? And when should I be eating it? What should I be eating after training, bearing in mind that this is often as late as 10:30 pm. And should I follow a different diet on rest days versus training days?

Iíd really be grateful for any advice you can give me or any straightforward resources you can direct me to.

Thanks,
Paul

Cant_See_D
01-29-2009, 07:49 PM
i have the same problem as u man i just cant grip on what to do. it be nice if someone just layed out a nutrtion layout for 4500 plus calories and i would be golden lol

Unreal
01-29-2009, 08:38 PM
Read the sticky "What a body builder eats". Mix and match those foods for 4500 cals. It isn't hard.

cichlidfort
01-29-2009, 10:08 PM
If you're not gaining weight, it's most likely because you're not eating enough of the right foods. For starters, try taking in about 3500-4000 calories a day. Once your metabolism adjusts, bump your calorie intake to 4000-4500 a day. Try to eat about 150 grams of protein a day too.

You'll never gain weight if you don't eat right so try these foods: Cheese, nuts, fish, deli meats, chicken, whole rice, egg whites, and peanut butter. A lot of members here are a big fan of milk and for good reason. Milk can help you add calories in your diet and is a good source of protein if it is drank consistently. I would go with whole milk as a recommendation.

Eat the same foods everyday. Don't eat something different on your non-workout days. Key is being consistent with your routine. The only thing you don't want to keep consistent is your workout. Change it up every now and then. Don't lift the same weight or do the same reps or even do the same exercises for the same muscles. In order for your muscles to grow, you have to keep placing different stress on it. There is this thing called muscle memory and if you do the same exact exercises, your body will adapt so that's why it's important to switch things up.

I am sure there are others on here that could touch up with what I said. Good luck.

P.S.- Never go to sleep hungry...ever.

jreed110
01-30-2009, 03:00 AM
Im no expert but your body fat, just under 16%, sounds very high to me for someone who is 5,9" and weighs only 142pounds. How much weight have you added to your lifts since you started lifting?

VikingWarlord
01-30-2009, 06:21 AM
Im no expert but your body fat, just under 16%, sounds very high to me for someone who is 5,9" and weighs only 142pounds. How much weight have you added to your lifts since you started lifting?

16% bodyfat isn't very high. 14-17% is what I normally see as being "fit".

jreed110
01-30-2009, 11:56 AM
Sorry I didn't mean that 16% was high, just that it was higher than I'd expect for someone at his hight and weight.