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mcdonough9395
01-31-2009, 07:29 PM
I see people on the site talk about and post their body fat % all the time. I have never known my body fat % mainly because i dont know how to get it. How do you figure it out? Is there a place you can go? or machine u can use? Or is there just a simple calculation?

jocs
01-31-2009, 07:50 PM
I bought a body fat measuring caliper for $30. From what I've heard these are the most accurate way of measuring body fat. Easy to use, just follow the instructions and you can meaure all by yourself.

RichMcGuire
02-01-2009, 02:43 AM
I bought a body fat measuring caliper for $30. From what I've heard these are the most accurate way of measuring body fat. Easy to use, just follow the instructions and you can meaure all by yourself.

There isnt a good way to measure your body fat other than under water weighing. You would typically use a caliper as a way of progress if you did it the same everytime you used it.

Dallas J
02-01-2009, 10:45 AM
You could always do it the army way and measure your waist and neck then compare it to your weight..(/sarcasm)

Without a dunk tank though, you can pretty much only compare before and after which IMO is just as useful.

Dallas7676
02-04-2009, 09:40 AM
Calipers are good but do not go with just one measurement. You need to measure in more spots to come close to being accurate.

Here:

linear-software.com/online

Edit, it won't allow me to post urls yet so add a (.html) to the end of the above link.

ALPINEstar
02-04-2009, 10:11 AM
Here you go: http://www.linear-software.com/online.html.

All you need is just a measuring tape that's used for tailoring.

Puddle_Pirate
02-04-2009, 08:26 PM
I have a Tanita / Ironman scale that is pretty accurate.

thecompetetiveedge.com

smalls
02-05-2009, 01:22 AM
I have a Tanita / Ironman scale that is pretty accurate.

thecompetetiveedge.com



No, it is not. It can be off by 6% in either direction meaning if it said you were 12 you could be 18 or 6, pretty innacurate. Add to that your hydration and food intake and it makes it even worse. I have done hydrostatic and bod pod and the BIA on the same day, as did many other classmates. BIA's are horrible.

DEXA, hydrostatic, and bod pod are currently consider the best in the industry, in that order.

Dallas7676
02-07-2009, 11:50 AM
Ya, those body fat scales royally suck

Thanks for posting the link Alpine.

VikingWarlord
02-07-2009, 12:35 PM
There isnt a good way to measure your body fat other than under water weighing. You would typically use a caliper as a way of progress if you did it the same everytime you used it.

Actually, DEXA is more accurate and more complete than hydrostatic measurement.

The method Alpine posted isn't the best but it's not too bad since it takes a lot more measurements into consideration.

T FLEX
02-07-2009, 12:51 PM
No, it is not. It can be off by 6% in either direction meaning if it said you were 12 you could be 18 or 6, pretty innacurate...

Might want to check your math on that. 18 or 6 body fat would be a 50% inaccuracy.

If it said you were 12% body fat, a 6% inaccuracy means you could weigh anywhere from 11.28%-12.72%... which really isn't that inaccurate. ;) :D

jreed110
02-07-2009, 01:26 PM
He says it could be off by 6% so I would assume fom his maths he means 6% body fat, not 6% margin of error.

Jessielynn
02-07-2009, 01:36 PM
Hi i have a question i am a 23 F i am trying to lose weight i work out 6-7 days a week 2 hours a day. I eat about 1000 to 1200 calories a day i lost 7 pounds and my lean body mass jumped from 115 to 135 in one month is that normal is that good, bad Thank you for your time Jessie

VikingWarlord
02-07-2009, 01:41 PM
Might want to check your math on that. 18 or 6 body fat would be a 50% inaccuracy.

If it said you were 12% body fat, a 6% inaccuracy means you could weigh anywhere from 11.28%-12.72%... which really isn't that inaccurate. ;) :D


He says it could be off by 6% so I would assume fom his maths he means 6% body fat, not 6% margin of error.

Yup.

smalls
02-07-2009, 04:45 PM
lol, ****in math dorks. Looking in the mirror and being honest with yourself is better than pretty much any method out there IMO. It' the being honest with yourself that most people can't handle.

VikingWarlord
02-07-2009, 04:59 PM
lol, ****in math dorks. Looking in the mirror and being honest with yourself is better than pretty much any method out there IMO. It' the being honest with yourself that most people can't handle.

Yeah, unless you need to know at least an approximate body composition so you can figure out macros or something like that. Most people have no idea how to estimate bodyfat by looking, especially when so many people don't have even partitioning of bodyfat.

I'm sure eyeballing it is always going to be superior to DEXA testing.

T FLEX
02-07-2009, 09:25 PM
He says it could be off by 6% so I would assume fom his maths he means 6% body fat, not 6% margin of error.

Haha, sorry about that Smalls. Ya I guess that would be a huge difference, my bad. Forgive me as I go work on getting bigger now. :D:D

joelhall
02-21-2009, 01:53 PM
ive always found the best way to monitor bodyfat is to look in the mirror and pinch an inch. i never worry about the precise number really as it just seems to be details unless youre really overweight.

SpecialK
02-23-2009, 08:50 AM
No, it is not. It can be off by 6% in either direction meaning if it said you were 12 you could be 18 or 6, pretty innacurate. Add to that your hydration and food intake and it makes it even worse. I have done hydrostatic and bod pod and the BIA on the same day, as did many other classmates. BIA's are horrible.

DEXA, hydrostatic, and bod pod are currently consider the best in the industry, in that order.

But is the Tanita scale at least consistent? That is, maybe my true bodyfat is 12%, but if the scale consistently gives readings of 18%, then it can still be useful for tracking changes in bodyfat, even if the absolute number isn't correct.

I suppose the scientific terms I am looking for are precision vs. accuracy. Precision refers to how close a measurement is to it's true value. Accuracy refers to how close repeated measurements are to each other. I am claiming that maybe the scales are accurate, even if they aren't precise.

Also, where does one even go to have bod pod, dexa, and hydrostatic measurements done? Google isn't helping me much here.

smalls
02-23-2009, 07:37 PM
I beleive the tanita is fairly accurate based on my own findings. But hydration levels etc can influence it.

Most colleges with have a bod pod or hydrostatic wieghing that can sometimes be utilized for a nominal fee.

There is a company that does hydrostatic weighing and costs around 45 dollars, but I'm not sure if you have anything like that and I can't remember the name at alll sorry.

RonnyB
02-26-2009, 11:52 AM
I'll tell you what, i was water tested about 2 years ago at 9.8% ( im around 13-14ish now guesstimate) and around that time my scale would say around 9-11% consistently so iunno, i wouldn't call them "accurate" but they're fun to play with and fun to gauge how much bf you've actually lost. Truth be told, don't trust anything but water, even calipers are off because everyone uses them differently.