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jumperzz
02-20-2009, 03:47 AM
G9xH19XAhdw


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9xH19XAhdw


i apologize for the side view again

kingswoodlegend
02-20-2009, 05:42 AM
looks great bro!...

umm just one thing, you kinda look like your dropping into your squat...go down slower (at a controlled pace) and push up fast ;)

but yeah they look nice and deep...

jumperzz
02-20-2009, 06:15 AM
looks great bro!...

umm just one thing, you kinda look like your dropping into your squat...go down slower (at a controlled pace) and push up fast ;)

but yeah they look nice and deep...

i always believe in squatting deep :D

RAT
02-20-2009, 10:43 AM
good squat just dont let ur knees go over ur toes...before u start take a deep breath and tighten ur abs and poke ur butt out and sit back while u squat

-JM-
02-20-2009, 12:59 PM
good squat just dont let ur knees go over ur toes

IMHO, with that depth and as close a stance as that, it would be difficult for the knees not to go past the toes.

squat huge
02-20-2009, 01:44 PM
There is not one proper way to squat, there are several techniques depending on your goal. If you look at the bottom part of your squat you notice that you have lumbar flexion, or in other words your lower back rounds and your but tucks under. The guy who said stick your but out is right on, just don't stick your chest out at the same time, as this will cause thoracic hyper-extension. The experts say that lumbar flexion is damaging to your spine when squatting. I like to squat with a pretty narrow stance as you were in the video. If you go low like you were with a narrow stance one of two things has to occur in order to keep your center of mass within your base. The first is your but can tuck under, the second is your toes can go over your knees. If you have really strong quads your knees can go way over your toes and your spine will remain neutral (Branch Warren squats like this), but typically both of these adjustments happen to some degree as is the case with you. To avoid lumbar flexion with a narrow stance simply do not go as low, or perform front squats. Holding the barbell in front will transfer your center of mass forward, thus allowing you or should I say forcing you to stay more upright. Being more upright allows you to squat deeper without lumbar flexion, check out Hossein Reza the world's strongest olympic lifter, just youtube "front squat" and he will come up, notice how flat his back remains and how upright he remains despite squatting very deep. To squat lower with traditional back squats simply widen your stance and point your toes slightly out, this should reduce lumbar flexion as your but will not travel as far back as you go down. This stance also puts more emphasis on the glutes. When an olympic lifter does a snatch and squats out of the hole with the weight over head, their feet are not exessively wide, however their knees spread pretty wide allowing space for their hips to move forward.

-JM-
02-20-2009, 02:04 PM
There is not one proper way to squat, there are several techniques depending on your goal. If you look at the bottom part of your squat you notice that you have lumbar flexion, or in other words your lower back rounds and your but tucks under. The guy who said stick your but out is right on, just don't stick your chest out at the same time, as this will cause thoracic hyper-extension. The experts say that lumbar flexion is damaging to your spine when squatting. I like to squat with a pretty narrow stance as you were in the video. If you go low like you were with a narrow stance one of two things has to occur in order to keep your center of mass within your base. The first is your but can tuck under, the second is your toes can go over your knees. If you have really strong quads your knees can go way over your toes and your spine will remain neutral (Branch Warren squats like this), but typically both of these adjustments happen to some degree as is the case with you. To avoid lumbar flexion with a narrow stance simply do not go as low, or perform front squats. Holding the barbell in front will transfer your center of mass forward, thus allowing you or should I say forcing you to stay more upright. Being more upright allows you to squat deeper without lumbar flexion, check out Hossein Reza the world's strongest olympic lifter, just youtube "front squat" and he will come up, notice how flat his back remains and how upright he remains despite squatting very deep. To squat lower with traditional back squats simply widen your stance and point your toes slightly out, this should reduce lumbar flexion as your but will not travel as far back as you go down. This stance also puts more emphasis on the glutes. When an olympic lifter does a snatch and squats out of the hole with the weight over head, their feet are not exessively wide, however their knees spread pretty wide allowing space for their hips to move forward.

Great post. Thanks a lot.