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rbtrout
03-03-2009, 09:15 AM
I've got a weak bench, I know and am working to get the numbers up. My sticking point is about 1/2 way up and I've been using 2 & 3 boards for pressing. My question is - does sticking about 1/2 up show a weakness in my tris?
Thanks, guys.

Travis Bell
03-03-2009, 09:31 AM
Depends on how you bench. If you bench elbows out, it's probably shoulders. Elbows in, yeah it'd be a tricep thing

rbtrout
03-03-2009, 09:32 AM
Although I've been trying to have my elbows in, as the weight gets heavier, the elbow come out. It's a hard habit to break. I guess if I work both shoulders and tris really hard, I'll be covered.

Travis Bell
03-03-2009, 09:36 AM
Well, take it slow. Your shoulders are already getting worked by benching. Don't beat them up too much. Working them is fine, but treat your shoulder work as an ascessory exercise, not one that you should be going balls out on

Watch Ryan Celli's videos. That's the way to bench. His elbows stay tucked all the way through, which allows them to really get engaged.

rbtrout
03-03-2009, 09:41 AM
Maybe I need to start over and really re-train myself on benching technique? I'll give them view. Thanks, Travis.

vdizenzo
03-03-2009, 06:20 PM
What do you think your strong point is in the bench.

rbtrout
03-04-2009, 09:57 AM
I think right at the bottom. I had a friend, years ago, that always yelled 'boom' at the bottom and told me to explode up. That's always stuck in my mind and I get it off my chest quite well. Un-racking is a bit wobbly, but has got much better since I've been doing rack lockouts and concentrating on widening my foot placement.

rbtrout
03-04-2009, 11:09 AM
I searched, but couldn't find those benching vids, link?

BigTallOx
03-04-2009, 12:01 PM
Depends on how you bench. If you bench elbows out, it's probably shoulders. Elbows in, yeah it'd be a tricep thing


Although I've been trying to have my elbows in, as the weight gets heavier, the elbow come out. It's a hard habit to break. I guess if I work both shoulders and tris really hard, I'll be covered.

Didn't you say you've had past shoulder injuries in prior posts here? ( Maybe I'm remembering wrong ) But, if so, I think this makes sense, you're benching with your elbows out when going heavy. I've had past shoulder issues too ( although now they're pretty healthy, knock on wood ) but my shoulders are my weak spot in benching. However, I have relatively strong triceps. When I moved my grip in about an inch on each side, it made it much easier to keep my elbows somewhat tucked and enabled me to use my tri's, and that's when my bench started going up. Even with my huge range of motion, for me I benefit from not using a grip as wide as possible. Just an inch in made a huge difference.

I realize benching equipped is probably much different, but you're benching raw right?

vdizenzo
03-04-2009, 12:12 PM
If you have to bench with a closer grip it means your lats are weak. Your lats are MUCH bigger than your triceps. You want to take advantage of that if at all possilbe.

rbtrout
03-04-2009, 12:14 PM
Didn't you say you've had past shoulder injuries in prior posts here? ( Maybe I'm remembering wrong ) But, if so, I think this makes sense, you're benching with your elbows out when going heavy. I've had past shoulder issues too ( although now they're pretty healthy, knock on wood ) but my shoulders are my weak spot in benching. However, I have relatively strong triceps. When I moved my grip in about an inch on each side, it made it much easier to keep my elbows somewhat tucked and enabled me to use my tri's, and that's when my bench started going up. Even with my huge range of motion, for me I benefit from not using a grip as wide as possible. Just an inch in made a huge difference.

I realize benching equipped is probably much different, but you're benching raw right?

Yes, my left shoulder pops out every once in a while causing me to start over again. I'll give the slightly close grip a shot. Thanks, BTO.

BigTallOx
03-04-2009, 12:19 PM
If you have to bench with a closer grip it means your lats are weak. Your lats are MUCH bigger than your triceps. You want to take advantage of that if at all possilbe.

OK, I haven't heard that before. Thanks for the info. I'll start focusing on my lats as well. Im not too suprised, this does make sense, I think lack of back tightness is why I have the problems of my first rep being crappy ( as shown in the video I posted ). Doing the first rep gets my back tight like it should be, and the next rep is easy.

Thanks vdizenzo, I appreciate the information.

rbtrout
03-04-2009, 04:30 PM
Yeah, no kidding. I'll have to work extra hard on shoulders, tris and lats.
BTW - I do bench raw.

Hazerboy
03-04-2009, 04:37 PM
I searched, but couldn't find those benching vids, link?


1yjGDnTDAEY

FREAKING BEAST!

Travis Bell
03-04-2009, 08:49 PM
This one is a little clearer. Watch how solid his form is. Ryan stays super tight, resisting the natural idea to flare when the weight gets to grind a little. His elbows stay tucked very tight all the way to lockout.

3PNPRLJnMLM

rbtrout
03-05-2009, 11:13 AM
Man, and he paused on his chest. Since I've never been to a meet, would that kind of be waiting for the signal of a good lift?

Travis Bell
03-05-2009, 11:19 AM
Well at meets, you get a "Press" command so there is a slight pause, so including that in training is a good idea