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Al19067
03-03-2009, 10:36 AM
My friend and I was arguing today cause he has a health class and his teacher is a trainer, and the teacher talls him that u only need .83grm per kg of protein to build muscle, and he tells him that they lie on protein powder that's its off and not the amount they say is in it is this true, I always thought u need 1 to 1.5 per pound

Ace7644
03-03-2009, 10:38 AM
well that wasent funny at all

nockits
03-03-2009, 10:41 AM
0.8g might be the absolute minimum for building "muscle". but bodybuilders tend to focus around 1.5g give or take 0.5 depending on your needs.

Pete22
03-03-2009, 10:55 AM
Tell your friend to drop the class.

nockits
03-03-2009, 11:17 AM
Tell your friend to drop the class.

Or, stay in the class, pass it, but don't "learn" anything from.

Sensei
03-03-2009, 09:40 PM
I think it's pretty safe to say that it is HARD to get 1 gram/pound of bodyweight in most normal diets. Is more protein a good idea if you are training hard? Sure. Can you gain on less (i.e. 1g/kg)? I think the answer is yes.

edit: btw, this should be in the diet & nutrition forum.

Travis Bell
03-03-2009, 09:52 PM
.83g per KG does sound somewhat low to me. I normally shoot for the 1g per LB of bodyweight, but I don't always hit it

Hazerboy
03-04-2009, 12:07 AM
I want to shoot whoever came up with this 1.5-2 g per pound of bodyweight thing. Do you know how hard it is to do that?? It was easy when I was something like, 130 lbs, but now that I'm pushing 200 its damn near impossible.

I make great gains now and I don't even supplement with whey. Excessive amounts of protein will certainly help, but they're not going to make or break you.

I would tell your friend to ask his teacher what peer reviewed study he got that figure from - and don't say some biology textbook. Often those are years behind in terms of training (for instance: http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/inconvenient_truths_protein_health_and_strength_sports).

I have no idea about the supplement companies.

VikingWarlord
03-04-2009, 04:04 AM
Why do you all say it's so hard? I've run multiple cycles of PSMF and managed to cram 240g of protein into 1350 kCal using 100% whole food. It's easy if you spend some time to think about it.

Protein is easy.

Sensei
03-04-2009, 06:01 AM
I said "in a normal diet" Viking. We've all done it, but I don't know how necessary it is for most trainees. That's all I'm saying.

VikingWarlord
03-04-2009, 07:17 AM
I said "in a normal diet" Viking. We've all done it, but I don't know how necessary it is for most trainees. That's all I'm saying.

I wasn't really talking about you. There are a lot of people around here that say they CAN'T get that much protein, like it's a logistical or physical impossibility. It's really pretty easy to do. There was a thread in Gen Chat recently on that very topic.

3 8oz chicken breasts are going to have about 150g. 8oz of tuna has 52g. A pound of white fish will have almost 100g.

Based on my (nowhere near expert level) understanding of metabolic physiology, it seems like a higher protein consumption is actually more important while cutting and the greater the caloric deficit, the more protein should be consumed to spare muscle.

When bulking, you'll be more likely to have a higher carbohydrate intake. Since carbohydrates spare protein, your body is more likely to use what it gets to build muscle rather than burn it for fuel.

Of course, this leaves a lot of variables out of the equation, but that's what it seems like on the most basic level.

Steven001
03-04-2009, 07:28 AM
Again, some people saying 1g per KG of bodyweight and others saying 1g per lb of bodyweight, that's a big difference! Which is it?

VikingWarlord
03-04-2009, 07:42 AM
I've always used Lyle's guideline and based it on LBM. 1g/lb LBM on off days and 1.25g/lb on training days though I've never tried to bulk. Cutting is the only time I pay attention, so YMMV.

Al19067
03-04-2009, 10:22 AM
The teacher sauid there are studys done on iit and half of the time the protein dnt evebn get used it gets store as fat, but I dnt care I make sure I get my 1 gram per pound and I easly hit 200grams a day

AKMass
03-04-2009, 10:25 AM
well that wasent funny at all

But this was.

VikingWarlord
03-04-2009, 10:32 AM
The teacher sauid there are studys done on iit and half of the time the protein dnt evebn get used it gets store as fat, but I dnt care I make sure I get my 1 gram per pound and I easly hit 200grams a day

Now THAT is utter crap.

If you're in a deficit, you won't be storing fat unless you're doing something horrifically wrong. Fat storage happens when the calories in are higher than the calories out.

Songsangnim
03-04-2009, 06:11 PM
I wasn't really talking about you. There are a lot of people around here that say they CAN'T get that much protein, like it's a logistical or physical impossibility. It's really pretty easy to do. .

Agreed. 200 grams of protein is only 800 calories. That's pretty easy enough to eat. Chicken, beef, tuna..
.Another way is to buy or make high protein shakes (say with 40 or more grams per serving. 2-3 of those a day and you've got half or close to half your recommended protein intake.

ku_med
03-07-2009, 06:48 AM
Again, some people saying 1g per KG of bodyweight and others saying 1g per lb of bodyweight, that's a big difference! Which is it?

it is a big difference. what the op's teacher suggested of .83g per kilo comes out to .377 g per lb. Don't know what kind of gains one can expect with that

J.C.
03-07-2009, 07:14 AM
For what its worth, a book I read a few years ago put it at 1.4g-1.8g of protein per kg of bodyweight. Apparently greater amounts hadn't had any extra benefit. The UK RDA is 0.75g/kg (I'm guessing for a mostly sedentary individual).

Bottom line, your teacher is probably correct if he means the minimum amount, but wrong if he thinks that's the optimal amount.

duswdav
03-07-2009, 10:31 PM
Bottom line, your teacher is probably correct if he means the minimum amount, but wrong if he thinks that's the optimal amount.

well put.