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Andre518
03-27-2009, 11:31 PM
I was wondering how does speed work help make you stronger? Right now I'm doing speed sets on my deadlifts but I'm just trying to understand how they make you stronger oppose to doing heaver slower lifts.

Eric Downey
03-27-2009, 11:58 PM
The speed in which the muscles fire is what keeps the weight moving sometimes

bencher8
03-28-2009, 06:42 PM
Speed work doesnt make you "stronger"...it makes you faster. You increase the amount of force you can apply to the bar, by using submaximal weights, but pushing as hard as you can. This carrys over to pushing heavy weigths faster...which means that you will blast through your sticking point. Speed work is all about the rate of force development and muscle fiber recruitment.

Ryano
03-28-2009, 07:12 PM
Speed work doesnt make you "stronger"...it makes you faster. You increase the amount of force you can apply to the bar, by using submaximal weights, but pushing as hard as you can. This carrys over to pushing heavy weigths faster...which means that you will blast through your sticking point. Speed work is all about the rate of force development and muscle fiber recruitment.

DAMN! Well put Paul!!!!

Andre518
03-28-2009, 08:51 PM
Speed work doesnt make you "stronger"...it makes you faster. You increase the amount of force you can apply to the bar, by using submaximal weights, but pushing as hard as you can. This carrys over to pushing heavy weigths faster...which means that you will blast through your sticking point. Speed work is all about the rate of force development and muscle fiber recruitment.

Thanks for the info!

Brian Hopper
03-28-2009, 09:57 PM
DAMN! Well put Paul!!!!

I Totally agree!

Kenny Croxdale
03-29-2009, 08:28 AM
I was wondering how does speed work help make you stronger? Right now I'm doing speed sets on my deadlifts but I'm just trying to understand how they make you stronger oppose to doing heaver slower lifts.

Bencher8 provided some great information. As he noted, it allows you drive through your sticking point.

Think your sticking point as a mud hole. In driving through a mud hole, the more speed you have going though it, in your car, the greater you changes of making it through.

Let me add a little to it.

Speed sets for your deadlift (squat and bench press, as well) fall more into the area of power rather than speed.

Power is the multiplication of Strength X Speed. Power is measured in wattt, just like with light bulbs. The more watts you produce, the greater your power output.

Power = Strength X Speed. If your Strength level were a 2 and your Speed was 2, then your Power Rating = 4 (2 X 2 = 4).

If you can increase your strength to a 3 and you speed to a 3, then you Power = 9. You more than double you power output. Plyometric Bench Press Training For More Strength and Power, http://www.liftinglarge.com/index.asp?PageAction=Custom&ID=21

The use of moderate loads, roughly 45-60% of you max deadlift or squat, will increase power output. Olympic movements (power cleans, jerks, etc) are even better exercises at developing power output.

Speed (Speed-Strength) training occur primarily with ballistic loads of between 10-40% of your 1RM. Ballistic is defined as object or your body becoming airborne. That means throwing objects (bench press throws, see article above) or jumps (such as jump squats).

A good strength (1RM, Limiit Strength) training program should incorporate some speed and power movements.

Kenny Croxdale