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bluelew
04-08-2009, 10:08 AM
Newby here. 41- Been lifting raw and natural since I was 13 or so. Best lifts include 315 x 4 (touch and go) on bench, 285 x 5 military on smith, 100 DB seated press for 7 reps, 585 x 4 3/4 squat on smith. Most of these occurred 10-15 years ago. Just getting back into powerlifting. Bench is at 325 (T & G) Squat at 405, and DL at 385. I am 6' and 225 with long arms. My goal is to work on form and establish a good size and strength base to eventually compete with. I have read a lot of westside stuff and am curious if there are some other good books with regard to training routines I can rotate in and out for a year or so to get back in shape. Saw that Hatfield had some books out and looked at some of the stuff Louie Simmons recommends. Any opinions- all advice welcomed and appreciated.

Brian C
04-08-2009, 10:21 AM
Louie Simmons' Book of Methods..best out there

MarcusWild
04-08-2009, 11:35 AM
+1 for the "Westside Book of Methods"

Hazerboy
04-08-2009, 01:01 PM
I used Brooks D. Kubik's Dinosaur training for awhile. Its good if you're looking for something pretty simple, yet effective, with short workouts. Lots of rep work and partial range of motion work. Not sure if all the GPP would be what you're looking for though.

antknee
04-08-2009, 02:10 PM
Dino Training at the time anyway

Keys to Progress

Milo articles

Westside Book of Method currently

AJL11
04-08-2009, 02:21 PM
I think both of Rippetoe's books were great. Starting Strength and Practical Programming taught me a lot I thought I already knew...

Wendlers 5/3/1 is is a very popular choice as well.

antknee
04-08-2009, 02:40 PM
I like the 5/3/1 - very good basic stuff i wish i had long ago - but i like a lot more volume than listed there..LOTS more volume.

BrockO'Bummer
04-08-2009, 03:50 PM
Christian Thibaudeau's "Black Book of Training Secrets".

bluelew
04-08-2009, 04:09 PM
Thanks for all the responses. Other books with actual routines to try?

mike95763
04-08-2009, 04:30 PM
Books are great, but another thing you might try doing is looking at some of the training logs on this site. There are a lot of pro lifters like Travis who keep journals that are very informative. In my opinion these can be even more helpful than a book because they show what good lifters are actually doing. Also some of the non-pro journals are really good. I personally have taken a lot from guys like Pete22, LonesXedge and Reko. Lots of the guys on this site really know there stuff.

JK1
04-08-2009, 04:57 PM
Books are great, but another thing you might try doing is looking at some of the training logs on this site. There are a lot of pro lifters like Travis who keep journals that are very informative. In my opinion these can be even more helpful than a book because they show what good lifters are actually doing. Also some of the non-pro journals are really good. I personally have taken a lot from guys like Pete22, LonesXedge and Reko. Lots of the guys on this site really know there stuff.


Yup, thats a great place to start---the same with the logs on Elitefts.com.
I'll confess, I'm a Westside Groupie, so most of what I've read over the last couple of years is based on that training methodology. I'm also somewhat of a book geek (ya gotta do something while sitting on the toilet).



As far as books go these are probably the top 4 on my list:

Rippetoes Starting Strength--get this one for good descriptions of muscles and exercises and how to do them correctly. 1

Dave Tate and Jim Wendler: Beginner Training Manual ---this book is what got me going with training using Westside Methods. I also gained 20 lbs and put on over 100 lbs on my squat and 75 lbs on my bench and deadlift over the next year after reading and applying whats in this book. Things literally took off for me.

Louie Simmons The Book of Methods --this book explains Westside training very well, but it can be confusing for beginners. I also recommend getting:

Dave Tate and Jim Wendler: EFS Basic Training Manual. It fills in some of the holes you may have with reading Louies book.

If you have extra cash, get the other EFS E-books. They all have some useful information in them.



If you really want to look at progressive overload and see where some of the holes are with that method of training, see if you can locate a copy of Terry Grimwood's powerlifting manual (I can't remember the name of the book, I'll have to look when I get home). That book was the first one I read on powerlifting. Its got several routines in it, and if you compare those with other training methods, you can see why progressive overload will eventually result in stagnation. I did put on some quality muscle and gains while trainnig from the routines in it, but I stagnated too.

Other things to read:
Once you've read the book of methods and the EFS manual, go to Elitefts.com and Westside-Barbell.com and read every article there. It'll take a few days, but that is honestly how I spent my lunch hour for almost a year. Its also going to give you outstanding information on training.

WillNoble
04-08-2009, 05:28 PM
Louie Simmons' Book of Methods..best out there

all you need, However I will also recommend Starting Strength for the true beginner

Brad08
04-09-2009, 07:23 AM
Thanks for all the responses. Other books with actual routines to try?

Kelso's Texas Powerlifting book is dirt cheap and has quite a few routines.

But really it's not the number of routines that's important. What's important is finding a decent one and really busting ass on it and learning how to adapt your training to overcome plateaus.

Athos
04-09-2009, 07:51 AM
The Book of Methods is definitely my top choice, I've been through it more times than I can count and pick up something new every time I read it. I've read Wendler's 5/3/1 and it is a worthy read. I also found Mel Siff's Supertraining book that Lou references very helpful. Other interesting reads are Zatsiorsky's Science and Practice of Strength Training and several of Pavel Tsatsouline's books. Also, all of Lou's articles on the WSB site are invaluable, I owe much of my strength to those write-ups.

Pete22
04-09-2009, 08:00 AM
I've never read The Book of Methods, but when I was starting out I went to the Westside website and printed out EVERY single article on there and filled a huge binder. My laser printer at work almost exploded.

slashkills
04-09-2009, 08:51 AM
Its not really powerlifting but if you ever need to read up on speed and explosiveness the vertical jump bible is awesome.

gatorman2k6
04-09-2009, 10:13 AM
5/3/1 is all I've read and I recommend it as it explains everything you will need for the routine

rbtrout
04-09-2009, 11:14 AM
EFS Basic Training Manual
Wendler's 5/3/1

I need to buy and read the Book of Methods.


No offense meant, but you need to stay away from the smith machine.

shields
04-09-2009, 01:38 PM
my vote goes to

the louis simmons westside book, chock full of usefull info
keys to progress- very infomative and fun to read
the purposefull primative by marty galager- wow, all most to much info, tons of powerlifting stuff in it.
the bodybuilding handbook by pavel, hell all the pavel books are great
starting strength is great
get a subscription to milo and buy back issues
dino training is a great read also, lots of fun stuff in it

Ryano
04-09-2009, 02:31 PM
"Nutrient Timing System:The Future of Sports Nutrition". I don't remember the author's name and can't find my copy.(Probably loaned it to someone). All the workouts in the world won't help much if you don't feed the machine! It's not only important as to what you eat, but when you eat it. Reads like a textbook, but very informative.

bluelew
04-09-2009, 08:01 PM
EFS Basic Training Manual
Wendler's 5/3/1

I need to buy and read the Book of Methods.


No offense meant, but you need to stay away from the smith machine.

No offense taken. That was many years ago when I was power/bodybuilding just trying to be the strongest at every lift possible. I do everything in a rack now.

Cmanuel
04-09-2009, 09:07 PM
I think both of Rippetoe's books were great. Starting Strength and Practical Programming taught me a lot I thought I already knew...

Wendlers 5/3/1 is is a very popular choice as well.

I was going to recommend all of these as well. I think everyone could benefit from Starting Strength, regardless of skill level.

Basic training manual helped me out a lot, especially learning westside system.

Also, books are great, but there are tons of useful info online for free... archives, logs, etc. Some people have already mentioned

Two VERY helpful sites for me have been Madcow's training page, and also the Deep Squatter Strength Archives... both of which are linked in my sig below.

Delta4dog
04-09-2009, 09:50 PM
There is an ad over at powerliftingwatch.com under classifieds with alot of these books for sale at good prices

chris mason
04-09-2009, 11:36 PM
Louie's Book of Methods:

www.westside-barbell.com

You can then ask the master himself a question on our site! Check out the sticky in this forum.

Chris

SGT ROCK
04-10-2009, 06:44 AM
I have read most of the books out there, I did read the book of methods and found it to be a decent read, great learning book for anyone, especially those that haven't had the chance to read many of Louies great monthly articles in PLUSA. Best PL books that I have read:

CHAMPION OF CHAMPIONS BY LARRY PACIFICO, TOP NOTCH!
JON KUCS BOOK, GREAT READ!!!
and probably the best selling PL book ever:

INSIDE POWERLIFTING BY TERRY TODD

It is fun to compare the training methods of decades ago vs today,
many of todays champions still train the core of their training the same way! (Scott Smith, Ed Coan etc) Back in the day bands and chains weren't in vogue, although reference to box squats was definitely found. Standard periodization or heavy singles done every week seemed to be the most popular, and crazy high volume done by some (KAZ!). Deadlifts were done nearly every week and many benched heavy twice a week, and some (Williams) 3 or more! For me it was fun to contrast different decades and how training has changed. Best bet for me is to take the best from each lifter or time frame you feel is closest to your body style or liking, and build a routine to fit your own needs. I definitely reccomend reading all of the PL books you can find to help you in your own training.

Semper Fi

bluelew
04-10-2009, 08:53 AM
Thanks for all the replies. Question: I have read/downloaded and am digesting a lot of Louie's articles from the WS web site. Does the book of methods offer more than the articles do or would I be better off spending $52 on a different book. Also any old school books from Coan, Furnace, Kaz with example training routines? Just looking for a variety of sources to try to see what works for me. Thanks again.

slashkills
04-10-2009, 10:17 AM
Not really, i have the book and ive seen some of the chapters/sections in the book are word for word from some of the articles. There are more sample routines and exercise descriptions in the book than on the website though.

EatMyWay2TheTop
04-10-2009, 10:46 AM
I have read most of the books out there, I did read the book of methods and found it to be a decent read, great learning book for anyone, especially those that haven't had the chance to read many of Louies great monthly articles in PLUSA. Best PL books that I have read:

CHAMPION OF CHAMPIONS BY LARRY PACIFICO, TOP NOTCH!
JON KUCS BOOK, GREAT READ!!!
and probably the best selling PL book ever:

INSIDE POWERLIFTING BY TERRY TODD

It is fun to compare the training methods of decades ago vs today,
many of todays champions still train the core of their training the same way! (Scott Smith, Ed Coan etc) Back in the day bands and chains weren't in vogue, although reference to box squats was definitely found. Standard periodization or heavy singles done every week seemed to be the most popular, and crazy high volume done by some (KAZ!). Deadlifts were done nearly every week and many benched heavy twice a week, and some (Williams) 3 or more! For me it was fun to contrast different decades and how training has changed. Best bet for me is to take the best from each lifter or time frame you feel is closest to your body style or liking, and build a routine to fit your own needs. I definitely reccomend reading all of the PL books you can find to help you in your own training.

Semper Fi

Any idea where I can get those books ? Ed Coan also has a pretty good book, tons of great pictures and an inside look at his training philosophy and routine

Cmanuel
04-10-2009, 02:18 PM
Oh yeah, I want to check out Ed Coans book. That guy is a freak, my all time favorite power lifter for sure.

bluelew
04-10-2009, 08:43 PM
There is a link to an interview with him about 10 posts down.

SGT ROCK
04-11-2009, 06:21 AM
Geez I forgot about Eddys book. I had an autographed copy and honest to goodness someone swiped it from me at an airport, easily one of the best books I ever read on PL, I put that at number one tied with INSIDE POWERLIFTING. To find "odd books" that may be out of print try Google or Amazon and you may be surprised. Eddys book was simply an awesome read. Inside Powerlifting was a great peak of a dozen or more of the best of all times routines, including RDC, Anello, and so many more, it was a breakthrough book and if my memory serves me correct, BY FAR the number one best selling PL book. Most of the best of all time in that book chose periodization and or very heavy singles and pulled every single week, no talk of CNS breakdown or off weeks etc.

Semper Fi

teeroy
04-12-2009, 09:19 PM
Inside Powerlifting is listed on Amazon for $215. Wow! Must be a collector's item now.

SGT ROCK
04-13-2009, 10:27 PM
Inside Powerlifting is listed on Amazon for $215. Wow! Must be a collector's item now.

LOL I remember as a young boy in grade school they actually had it in the school library, and I would keep signing it out almost year round as I just couldnt seem to deliver enough papers to save enough to buy it lol. It is worth alot but maybe not 200 bucks? It is the best book on PL ever written and very unique in that it takes the routines of many all time greats (at the time they were at the top of the game, and decades later they still are!) and shows their cycles in depth. I am tearing my house apart trying to find it as we speak! It is amazing to look at those routines and compare them to now. The average champion trained much different back then as the DL made up a bigger percentage of the total.

Semper Fi

Delta4dog
04-13-2009, 11:07 PM
Check out the classifieds at powerliftingwatch.com