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View Full Version : My Diet Plan - Trying to Find Right Balance - Please Critique



champ.49er
04-08-2009, 03:27 PM
Hi all. I've been trying to find the right balance diet plan. Please see the attached image from my TheDailyPlate.com info.

Info: 31 years old (skinny fat)
6'00"
192 lbs morning weight (was at 215 lbs a few months ago)

Goals:
Lose gut/belly fat and gain muscle.

When I say I'm trying to find the right balance, I'm trying to:
1. Prevent too much carbs which could lead to a bigger gut/bell.
2. Prevent too much protein to prevent long term health issues.
3. Intake 3000-3200 calories for a clean bulk.

I'd like to lower my protein intake, but I'm not sure how to find the right balance of not increasing my protein or fat intake. This seems pretty easy, but it's actually been hard for me to find the right foods to through in there.

According to TheDailyPlate.com, my caloric intake should be around 3000 calories. Could you please look over my diet plan and let me know what I can change/adjust? Thanks in advance.

Pimpstick
04-08-2009, 03:29 PM
More fat, less carbs, protein is fine. you aren't going to lose belly fat if you are bulking.

VikingWarlord
04-08-2009, 03:37 PM
How far above maintenance is what you're planning to eat? Not some calculated maintenance but your actual tracked real life maintenance level?

Your goals are fine, but this part:



When I say I'm trying to find the right balance, I'm trying to:
1. Prevent too much carbs which could lead to a bigger gut/bell.
2. Prevent too much protein to prevent long term health issues.
3. Intake 3000-3200 calories for a clean bulk.

suggests that you don't really understand what's going on here.

Your protein intake can actually be raised. 250g is fine for someone looking to gain, especially when you're right around 200lbs to begin with. This puts you at about 1.25gP per lb of bodyweight. That's perfectly acceptable. What "long term health issues" are you worried about?

Your fat intake can be raised. 77g is nothing. Fat doesn't make you fat. You should be at around half a gram per pound which would be about 100g of fat per day minimum.

Beyond that, it doesn't really matter. Eat, train hard and heavy, and if you gain too much fat, cut your calories back. It's ridiculously easy to bulk.

champ.49er
04-08-2009, 03:56 PM
How far above maintenance is what you're planning to eat? Not some calculated maintenance but your actual tracked real life maintenance level?
Well, for the past 3 weeks, I've been at the same weight, but my gut has gotten a little smaller, so I believe my maintenance is 3000 calories. Maybe I gained muscle and lost fat? Obviously, I'm still learning a lot.



Your protein intake can actually be raised. 250g is fine for someone looking to gain, especially when you're right around 200lbs to begin with. This puts you at about 1.25gP per lb of bodyweight. That's perfectly acceptable. What "long term health issues" are you worried about?
From what I've read, too much protein intake could lead to kidney and/or liver damage. I've also read to keep protein intake no more than 1g per body weight. I'd like to throw in a protein blend shake for an evening snack, but was just worried the long term effects of the excessive protein.



Your fat intake can be raised. 77g is nothing. Fat doesn't make you fat. You should be at around half a gram per pound which would be about 100g of fat per day minimum.
Excellent, I was hoping to throw in some more peanut butter in there for more fat and calories.

Thanks again.

VikingWarlord
04-08-2009, 04:32 PM
Well, for the past 3 weeks, I've been at the same weight, but my gut has gotten a little smaller, so I believe my maintenance is 3000 calories. Maybe I gained muscle and lost fat? Obviously, I'm still learning a lot.

It's possible to recomp quickly when you're first starting out. Newbie gains can be huge.

If you're not gaining or losing scale weight eating as you are, then you've found maintenance. To gain, you need to eat above maintenance and train hard. To lose, you eat below maintenance and train hard. To recomp, you eat right around maintenance and train hard.


From what I've read, too much protein intake could lead to kidney and/or liver damage. I've also read to keep protein intake no more than 1g per body weight. I'd like to throw in a protein blend shake for an evening snack, but was just worried the long term effects of the excessive protein.

Well, I know you didn't read that stuff around here. There's a lot of crap out there and it's really hard to sift through. Excessive protein intake doesn't tend to cause a problem but if you're worried about it, drink a lot of water. You should be drinking a lot of water anyway.

Mercuryblade
04-09-2009, 01:15 AM
It's possible to recomp quickly when you're first starting out. Newbie gains can be huge.

If you're not gaining or losing scale weight eating as you are, then you've found maintenance. To gain, you need to eat above maintenance and train hard. To lose, you eat below maintenance and train hard. To recomp, you eat right around maintenance and train hard.



Well, I know you didn't read that stuff around here. There's a lot of crap out there and it's really hard to sift through. Excessive protein intake doesn't tend to cause a problem but if you're worried about it, drink a lot of water. You should be drinking a lot of water anyway.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/2859733.stm

From the aforementioned article:

Dairy or vegetable protein was not linked with worsening kidney function.

VikingWarlord
04-09-2009, 09:32 AM
Well, in fairness, vegetable protein tends to have a lower bioavailability than most other sources but yes. Nothing's ever suggested that high protein causes long term damage to anything.