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View Full Version : Bulking 101...any pointers?



Scrawnymoke
04-11-2009, 05:10 AM
I was looking around on the forums, and the basic idea seems to track my calorie intake for about a week. Find the avg, and +500 calories per day or is it week? Then continue adding calories if necessary. Am I on the right track?

Is there any specific links to a daily meal guide for bulking because I have no cooking abilities, and should I drink protein shakes everyday, or only on days that I lift? Since the powder is a bit pricey.

given'er
04-11-2009, 05:30 AM
Track your calories for a two weeks, try to eat close to the same calorie amount every day. If you maintain the same weight add 500 or more calories PER DAY to gain. You can add more on the days you lift if you want. You'll want to get at least 1 to 1.5 grams of protien per pound of your body weight a day. If protien powder can help you achieve that go for it, but it should only be part of the protien you get in a day.

MadScientist
04-11-2009, 07:19 AM
Add 1000 cals per day right off the bat. And for every 5 lbs you gain, add another 150-250 calories (your maintenance cals will increase as you add weight and you must compensate by adding more cals)

I add 350-500 cals when I gain 10lbs but I weigh a bit more and bulk with a 2000+ surplus. So you should go with the first scenario above.

Go buy eggs. Walmart sells 18 eggs for a little more than a dollar.

Hardboil them
Eat them all day, like 2 dozen a day or more.
Only eat 1 yoke for every 3-5 whites ( I do this to keep fat and sat fat in check, you might be able to eat more yokes.)

Check out my recipe thread in the recipe section, some bulking meals listed there, more to come.

Reassess your goals, results, adjust cals weekly or biweekly, but dont change things daily.

VikingWarlord
04-11-2009, 08:28 AM
I usually prefer a more controlled method than some people do. If you're eating your face off to build strength, that's one thing. If you're eating to gain quality mass and you've never done it before, it's too easy to go overboard and end up gaining 10lbs of lard for every half a pound of muscle. It all comes down to knowing your body. Eat, but if you start gaining more fat than you'd like, drop the calories. Start slow, at 20% or so above maintenance and then go from there.

It's not always as easy as "bulk to 45% bodyfat and cut to 10% in 2 months". Most people aren't willing to do something that can be easily avoided by being more controlled in the bulk. Hell, most people aren't capable of doing that, especially beginners, naturals, and people that aren't already 6'7 and almost 4 bills. ;)

Pimpstick
04-11-2009, 08:29 AM
I usually prefer a more controlled method than some people do. If you're eating your face off to build strength, that's one thing. If you're eating to gain quality mass and you've never done it before, it's too easy to go overboard and end up gaining 10lbs of lard for every half a pound of muscle. It all comes down to knowing your body. Eat, but if you start gaining more fat than you'd like, drop the calories. Start slow, at 20% or so above maintenance and then go from there.

It's not always as easy as "bulk to 45% bodyfat and cut to 10% in 2 months". Most people aren't willing to do something that can be easily avoided by being more controlled in the bulk. Hell, most people aren't capable of doing that, especially beginners, naturals, and people that aren't already 6'7 and almost 4 bills. ;)

Viking is right, unless you're juicing, slow and steady wins the race.

J.C.
04-11-2009, 09:04 AM
If you don't know how to cook, the learn to cook with beef mince.

Beef is an awesome source of protein, it tastes great, its really cheap, has plenty of quality calories, a good vitamin and mineral profile, and is easy and safe to cook.

Buy a KG of mince and fry an onion and some garlic in oil, add the mince until its brown then add a few tins of chopped tomatoes. Seperate it into tupperware, and keep portions in the fridge or freezer. Then all you need to do is cook some pasta or rice to go with it each time. You'll only spend half an hour cooking on a Sunday and ten minutes cooking the rice/pasta for each meal. Couldn't be easier. From this you can keep experimenting with different veggies and herbs and spices, making different chillis or bolognese sauces.