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Kenny-SFW
04-28-2009, 06:01 AM
Over the weekend a lifter cut over 30lbs. to make a weight class. The lifter made weight and put 30lbs. back on by the day of the meet. This lifter went on to set a new record total for this weight class. Personally I give the lifter a lot of credit to do what he did, however I can't help but think that this was not what was intended when weight classes were formed.

tomv
04-28-2009, 06:20 AM
Cut 30lbs in a weekend?... Man that's berserk. I've very little experience with cutting weight or making weight or anything like that but 30lbs in 2 days? and then gained 30lbs back in one day? That seems almost impossible...

drew
04-28-2009, 06:24 AM
Everybody does it and they have done it for as long as weigh-ins have been around. It's a risk, like anything else in this sport, that some guys are willing to take.

Now stop crying and lift something Kennybear.

Kenny-SFW
04-28-2009, 06:37 AM
You know Drew.., I never liked you, my little bear

mattdunkin
04-28-2009, 06:40 AM
One thing people need to realize in this sport as in any other, if what a lifter does meets or qualifies by the rules mandated by that fed then it is totally fair as everyone else has the same opportunity to do the same.I think a lot of people who compete more for fun or don't compete at all don't realize that for a lot of lifters-myself included-we will do anything it takes to reach our goals of putting up the biggest numbers possible,and if that means cutting,weighing in,and bloating back-up to a higher weight,then so be it.Same with gear and "supplements".If you are lifting in a fed that allows unlimited gear and choose not to do so,by all means that is cool,but don't say the guy that beat you who wore gangsta'd out gear cheated because it was your fault not to utilize the rules of that fed to the fullest.This sport is about putting up the biggest weight in competition and I think people need to realize that,and there are people willing to take certain steps as drastic to the outside or uninitiated observer as they may seem.

Lones Green
04-28-2009, 07:15 AM
Sure its fair. If you've ever cut weight before, you know how bad it sucks. If a lifter can cut 30+ lbs and gain it back then more power to them. So you have guys that lift at 220 who walk around 250, you'll have guys that lift at 242 that walk around at 260-270. It kind of balances itself out doesn't it? Cutting weight is part of the game in some feds. If you don't like the whole weight cutting that, there are feds with hour or 2 weigh - ins. Lift there!

Plus no one really said you HAVE to cut weight. I don't like it and I probably won't do it again for a long time. Lifting at 292 against guys who weigh 330 who cut to 308 isn't really fair, but who cares? Lift against yourself.

Cutting weight is part of other sports as well. Hell I knew guys in high school, 16-17 years old cutting 20 pounds for wrestling and they really didn't have any idea what they were doing.

Rob Luyando
04-28-2009, 07:22 AM
One thing people need to realize in this sport as in any other, if what a lifter does meets or qualifies by the rules mandated by that fed then it is totally fair as everyone else has the same opportunity to do the same.I think a lot of people who compete more for fun or don't compete at all don't realize that for a lot of lifters-myself included-we will do anything it takes to reach our goals of putting up the biggest numbers possible,and if that means cutting,weighing in,and bloating back-up to a higher weight,then so be it.Same with gear and "supplements".If you are lifting in a fed that allows unlimited gear and choose not to do so,by all means that is cool,but don't say the guy that beat you who wore gangsta'd out gear cheated because it was your fault not to utilize the rules of that fed to the fullest.This sport is about putting up the biggest weight in competition and I think people need to realize that,and there are people willing to take certain steps as drastic to the outside or uninitiated observer as they may seem.

I don't think I could have said it better myself........... Hell yes I could of. I would of dropped a couple F-bombs along the way but answer would of had same meaning.

Butcher
04-28-2009, 07:29 AM
To be fair, Kroczaleski was weighing 5 pounds less at competition than right before cutting weight.
http://asp.elitefts.com/qa/training-logs.asp?qid=94729&tid=

Athletes will push every single rule for every single advantage they can get. Im sure if Nascar drivers looked at what powerlifters do to get every advantage they would be pretty unimpressed compared to how they have there cars tweaked for every 10th of a horsepower.

Kenny Croxdale
04-28-2009, 08:11 AM
Over the weekend a lifter cut over 30lbs. to make a weight class. The lifter made weight and put 30lbs. back on by the day of the meet. .

First of all, I don't believe that.


This lifter went on to set a new record total for this weight class. Personally I give the lifter a lot of credit to do what he did,

Massive weight loss in short period of time is usually obtained via "water loading". As drew noted in his post, there a risk. To be more specific, you're gambling with your life.


however I can't help but think that this was not what was intended when weight classes were formed.

I I agree. However, as Matt noted, "...it is totally fair as everyone else has the same opportunity to do the same..."

As Bill Starr once stated, "Athletes will always find a way to beat the system".

Kenny Croxdale

AJL11
04-28-2009, 08:21 AM
First of all, I don't believe that.


Read Kroc's Journal on Elite He started at 255 on the 23th and oficially weighed in at 220 on the 24th.

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 08:30 AM
Yeah it is true. People act like lifters do this all the time though and everyone is capable of it. It is honestly very very difficult, but if you have a talent for it, more power to you

If someone can cut that much weight and make a lower class, I give them big props. I don't cut any weight, step on the scale and that's the class I'm in. I don't even see it as a fairness issue

Kenny Croxdale
04-28-2009, 08:34 AM
Read Kroc's Journal on Elite He started at 255 on the 23th and oficially weighed in at 220 on the 24th.

AJ,

Good enough.

However, it only a matter of time before a powerlifter falls over dead from doing this.

Mohamed Benaziza (bodybuilder) fell over dead from dehydration. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0KFY/is_12_23/ai_n16034008/pg_3/

Kenny Croxdale

KarstenDD
04-28-2009, 08:38 AM
Yes it is.

BigTallOx
04-28-2009, 09:14 AM
Over the weekend a lifter cut over 30lbs. to make a weight class. The lifter made weight and put 30lbs. back on by the day of the meet. This lifter went on to set a new record total for this weight class. Personally I give the lifter a lot of credit to do what he did, however I can't help but think that this was not what was intended when weight classes were formed.

That's why divisions should be divided up by height instead of weight. Leverages ( ie height ) cannot be changed, and are much more of a determining factor on how much weight can be moved.

Ben Moore
04-28-2009, 09:39 AM
That's why divisions should be divided up by height instead of weight. Leverages ( ie height ) cannot be changed, and are much more of a determining factor on how much weight can be moved.

Easily top 5 dumbest things I've ever heard

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 09:43 AM
That's why divisions should be divided up by height instead of weight. Leverages ( ie height ) cannot be changed, and are much more of a determining factor on how much weight can be moved.

So you'd have 300+lb guys competing against 181ers and the like?

Explain to me how that makes sense?

If what you were saying were true, I should be able to bench as much as Sean Frankle simply on the basis that we are the same height

BFGUITAR
04-28-2009, 10:04 AM
So you'd have 300+lb guys competing against 181ers and the like?

Explain to me how that makes sense?

If what you were saying were true, I should be able to bench as much as Sean Frankle simply on the basis that we are the same height

It doesn't.
Maybe size-weight ratios (arm length, leg length...) of some sort would make more sense but that point it just gets way too complicated.

If your tall than put on enough weight to be competitive, simple as that.

drew
04-28-2009, 10:17 AM
Just lift weights.

Reko
04-28-2009, 10:59 AM
It doesn't.
Maybe size-weight ratios (arm length, leg length...) of some sort would make more sense but that point it just gets way too complicated.

If your tall than put on enough weight to be competitive, simple as that.

Lets just not have weight classes and give everyone a first place trophy and a medal. That way everyone one is a winner!

MarcusWild
04-28-2009, 11:11 AM
I've cut from 238 to 220, and I bloated to 240. It's not that hard. The first 10 lbs is super easy. What Kroc does is on a different level though. That requires some serious mental toughness to voluntarily put yourself through that.

He has to be giving up something in strength to cut that much. He passed on this 3rd squat, and he passed on his 2nd deadlift to rest up for his 3rd. That makes me think he wasn't 100%. He was still strong enough to get the job done though.

JK1
04-28-2009, 11:29 AM
That's why divisions should be divided up by height instead of weight. Leverages ( ie height ) cannot be changed, and are much more of a determining factor on how much weight can be moved.


I dont' know about that---considering the fact I'm more than a foot shorter than you are and I've got at least 20 lbs on you..... Sure. :scratch:



Lifters will always push the limits with cutting weights. Its no different in any sport with a weight class. Hell its really no different than the county fair kids who feed their show pigs and sheep bb's so they make it into the higher weight class and then spend the weekend praying that the animal doesn't crap where someone will see it. Its almost human nature to push it like that...



That said, from a medical standpoint, I do think Kroc is really pushing it. He's no dummy, he knows what he's doing, but there is a limit to the degree of dehydration the body can withstand. The more he does it, the more likely there is to be that one screwup...

SELK
04-28-2009, 11:47 AM
I will never have the balls to cut that kind of weight, to many things can go wrong. Ive cut 15lbs or so, that was more then enough for me.

That being said, its fully fair. May as well take as many advantages as you can. Wear the best gear you can, lift in the lowest class, etc. Hell, if the judging is loose, I would consider lifting differently as well. No different then say football, if you are an o lineman and the refs are simply not calling holding penaltys (happens all the time) your going to start holding guys. :eek:

People are going to do what it takes to win.

SELK
04-28-2009, 11:48 AM
Also, even with 2 hour weigh ins people are cutting large amounts of weight. The difference is alot of them arn't getting it all back and are using more extreme measures to get it back (IVs, bloat pills etc)

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 12:18 PM
Also, even with 2 hour weigh ins people are cutting large amounts of weight. The difference is alot of them arn't getting it all back and are using more extreme measures to get it back (IVs, bloat pills etc)

This is true, although not quite as much as Kroc did.

People often think this is unique to powerlifting though. Wrestlers, MMA fighters and the like are constantly cutting good amounts of weight to make a given class. Pretty common practice actually

Kenny-SFW
04-28-2009, 12:30 PM
I just wanted to know other peoples opinion. The bottom line is that no matter what the rules are they are the same for everybody, therefore it is justified. As far as Kroc is concerned, I think we call all see what makes a champion a champion, drive, will, determination and the balls to have a plan attack it, execute it and come out on top. Test your resolve, take your body somewhere it's never been and prevail, constantly push your body to become stronger and stronger. Thank God I'm a fat bastard and I'll never have to cut weight. All hail to the elephants the SHW.:spam::burger:

Hazerboy
04-28-2009, 04:35 PM
I cut five lbs at my last meet and it was no big deal (2 hour weigh ins). But I also wrestled for 5 years, and I think the only reason other sports haven't received any controversy for their weight cutting practices is that they don't share the same number of athletes. I don't think something like this is unfair in the least because, well, its really not that bad for you, especially when you only have meets every few months or so (where as in wrestling I was doing it 1-3 times a week).




People often think this is unique to powerlifting though. Wrestlers, MMA fighters and the like are constantly cutting good amounts of weight to make a given class. Pretty common practice actually

This is true, but slowly they're trying to fade these practices out. It started with getting rid of 24 hour weigh ins. High school wrestling, and most collegiate wrestling, has done away with almost all of these for good reason: People die. Its happened before and get enough athletes together and enough people cutting weight and it will happen again.

But even two hour weigh ins didn't stop all the problems. Eventually everyone got together and said "look, this is really unhealthy, and we hate the stigma that its given our sport," so you had to get certified for your weight class. Take a urine hydration test, and if you fail, you have to come back when you're hydrated. After that you weigh in, they got a certified trainer to take your body fat percentage (averaged over 3 measurements) and they told you how much weight you could lose. My senior year I weighed in at 169 and they wouldn't let me drop down to 160. I ended up wrestling at 171, and was stronger and my record was better for it.

Some people could still "cheat" the test a bit (not eating for a day, for instance, will leave you lighter but still just as hydrated), but I think overall it helped.

If it were up to me, they should have just added 5 lbs to every weight class, put a scale on the edge of the mat, weighed in with all your gear on, shake hands, and wrestle. That would have gotten rid of all of this weight cutting crap, the classes would be more accurate, and the playing field would have been leveler. Everyone would have been healthier for it too.

Obviously powerlifting doesn't need something like this, but its something to think about. At the very least, I'm still in awe that any federations still have 24 hour weigh ins--the only reason you have these is so you can do things like cut 15 or 20 lbs!

As for cutting weight for two hour weigh ins, you can do it, but no where near to the extreme that kroc did, at least without taking a severe hit to your total (presumably). For one tournament I cut 7 lbs to 152 in my junior year and it was awful. I was weak and tired all day, and you can never get fully hydrated. Even at 8 o clock that night I was still chugging Gatorade and eating saltines, you just can't get enough fluids in, especially with matches in between.

evilxxx
04-28-2009, 04:53 PM
That's why divisions should be divided up by height instead of weight. Leverages ( ie height ) cannot be changed, and are much more of a determining factor on how much weight can be moved.

I think I see your point, more of a height to weight not just height. obviously a 198 lbs 5'5" bencher got a "lil "advantage over a 198 lbs 6'5" bencher. (muscle mass , arm length..etc...)

Eric Downey
04-28-2009, 05:05 PM
yes it is fair.

Hazerboy
04-28-2009, 06:20 PM
I think I see your point, more of a height to weight not just height. obviously a 198 lbs 5'5" bencher got a "lil "advantage over a 198 lbs 6'5" bencher. (muscle mass , arm length..etc...)


Yeah but this is true in any sport, especially combat sports where there are also weightclasses -- boxers with longer arms have a bigger reach, in wrestling one with longer arms/legs will have better leverage, etc.

Some people are just better suited to play certain sports. While we would like to level the playing field, in the end you'll always have 7 foot men dominating basketball, 250lb giants dominating football, and short, stubby armed dudes dominating powerlifting. As an athlete you either have to live with it, or find a new sport.

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 07:11 PM
I think I see your point, more of a height to weight not just height. obviously a 198 lbs 5'5" bencher got a "lil "advantage over a 198 lbs 6'5" bencher. (muscle mass , arm length..etc...)

The 6'5" guy might want to look into deadlifting


Again, I really think this is just a tad blown out of proportion. I can promise you, the majority of powerlifters are NOT cutting 30lbs like Kroc did. He certainly has a talent for it.

Making rules and regulations based upon one lifters extraordinary ability is silly and just complicates life for the rest of us.

Weighing in 48hrs in advance (WPO) was ridiculous, but a 24hr weigh in is fine. It's convienent. Big meets take long enough to get started without weighing in 80 lifters at one time. This is in fact a hobby after all

HP666
04-28-2009, 08:03 PM
That's why divisions should be divided up by height instead of weight. Leverages ( ie height ) cannot be changed, and are much more of a determining factor on how much weight can be moved.

Spoken like a guy who loves to use his height as a crutch. If I had a dollar for every time you whined about being 6-9 and how it effects your lifting I'd be a ****ing millionare. Like the man said, shut up and SFW. And I'm 6-4, so I don't want to hear it.

vdizenzo
04-28-2009, 08:38 PM
Ughhh I hate people talking about height and genetics. I saw the stubby arm comment and wanted to puke. When I started powerlifting I was 200lbs. Nobody said I had a genetic predisposition then. I busted my ass to put on 100lbs and now I am gifted. "F" off. SFW and get stronger. Anything else is an excuse.

Regarding the weight cutting thing I have no problem with it as long as there is none of that 48hr crap anymore. I cut 19 once and set a world record. Yeah, it was worth it for that day. However, now I would never try to cut more than 10. I just hated torturing myself like that. Dehydration sucks.

Rob Luyando
04-28-2009, 08:46 PM
AJ,

Good enough.

However, it only a matter of time before a powerlifter falls over dead from doing this.

Mohamed Benaziza (bodybuilder) fell over dead from dehydration. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0KFY/is_12_23/ai_n16034008/pg_3/

Kenny Croxdale

You must keep in mind that the guys that cut significant amounts of weight have a lot of knowledge about how they are doing it. I have cut as much as 23 lbs with a 24 hr weigh in. Does it suck cutting the weight? Yes. Was it worth it? Hell yes. Would I recomend this to a new kid in the sport? Hell no.

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 09:03 PM
AJ,

Good enough.

However, it only a matter of time before a powerlifter falls over dead from doing this.

Mohamed Benaziza (bodybuilder) fell over dead from dehydration. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0KFY/is_12_23/ai_n16034008/pg_3/

Kenny Croxdale

Kenny, bodybuilders stay dehydrated for much longer than powerlifters do for a weigh in. Most of them time it pefectly so they are hitting weight just about the time they need to weigh in and then they begin rehydrating as soon as possible.

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 09:05 PM
Ughhh I hate people talking about height and genetics. I saw the stubby arm comment and wanted to puke. When I started powerlifting I was 200lbs. Nobody said I had a genetic predisposition then. I busted my ass to put on 100lbs and now I am gifted. "F" off. SFW and get stronger. Anything else is an excuse.

Could not agree more. When I started I was 180lbs. Nobody said I was genetically gifted then either. I guess a lot of people just assume we come out of the womb weighing this much

BigTallOx
04-28-2009, 09:13 PM
Spoken like a guy who loves to use his height as a crutch. If I had a dollar for every time you whined about being 6-9 and how it effects your lifting I'd be a ****ing millionare. Like the man said, shut up and SFW. And I'm 6-4, so I don't want to hear it.

I don't use it as a crutch, if I did I wouldn't even be powerlifting. And 6'4" is not 6'8". ( I bet I've got a foot longer wingspan than any 6'4" guy ) But I am a powerlifter because for some unknown reason deep down inside I know it's what I need to do. And I love it even though I'll always be handicaped at competitions because how they are structured. Sometimes it's discouraging givien my leverages and ROM. When I bench, I have to move the bar twice as far as anybody else ( if not more ), and I'm at a serious disadvantage when the bar's on my chest ( where are your elbows when the bar touches? I guarentee you mine are farther back ). I have a 39" inseam so I'm at even more of a disadvantage for squatting. Why should I have to compete with somebody with half my ROM?

But whatever, I probably shouldn't have posted what I did, it's clear the short guys control things here.

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 09:20 PM
BTO, you kinda proved HP666's point there. You think you work twice as hard as anyone else could ever work at a powerlifting meet. The way that reads, you think you are the tallest most handicapped lifter out there and should deserve some sort of award for that.

If you want to overcome something, you find a way to overcome it. Otherwise just keep doing whatever it is that you're doing.

You want to know what a handicapp is BTO? Something more than being too tall. My fiance's brother has a handicapp. He's got CP. Rudy Hillyard has CP and benches. That guy never ceases to inspire me. I met a guy down in Tennessee who was in a wheelchair and was benching around 300lbs raw. They overcome man.

My point is put yourself in perspective. There are guys that overcome a ton more than you do just thinking you are too tall. So your arms are long. Big deal. Learn how to pull more.

HP666
04-28-2009, 09:20 PM
I don't use it as a crutch, if I did I wouldn't even be powerlifting. And 6'4" is not 6'8". ( I bet I've got a foot longer wingspan than any 6'4" guy ) But I am a powerlifter because for some unknown reason deep down inside I know it's what I need to do. And I love it even though I'll always be handicaped at competitions because how they are structured. Sometimes it's discouraging givien my leverages and ROM. When I bench, I have to move the bar twice as far as anybody else ( if not more ), and I'm at a serious disadvantage when the bar's on my chest ( where are your elbows when the bar touches? I guarentee you mine are farther back ). I have a 39" inseam so I'm at even more of a disadvantage for squatting. Why should I have to compete with somebody with half my ROM?

But whatever, I probably shouldn't have posted what I did, it's clear the short guys control things here.


Thank you for proving my point.

BigTallOx
04-28-2009, 09:27 PM
Thank you for proving my point.

What, that you think you're tall enough to argue that you have poor leverages for powerlifting, but aren't? ( grow some length on those arms and legs and see how much you lift. )

BigTallOx
04-28-2009, 09:31 PM
You think you work twice as hard as anyone else could ever work at a powerlifting meet.


I do. Work = force x distance. Yes, I do twice the work as most people here, if not more.



you think you are the tallest most handicapped lifter out there and should deserve some sort of award for that


No, I'd just like to compete against my peers.

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 09:34 PM
I do. Work = force x distance. Yes, I do twice the work as most people here, if not more.

LOL I see.

Well there ya have it folks. BTO is the strongest man alive regardless of the weight he's handling

BigTallOx
04-28-2009, 09:36 PM
LOL I see.

Well there ya have it folks. BTO is the strongest man alive regardless of the weight he's handling

What work in the physical sense doesn't mean anything? You've proved my point.

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 09:39 PM
haha are you always this stubborn?

I'll play along for a little longer

What do you think the formula is for force bud?

CrazyK
04-28-2009, 09:46 PM
Lets just not have weight classes and give everyone a first place trophy and a medal. That way everyone one is a winner!QFT!

BigTallOx
04-28-2009, 09:52 PM
haha are you always this stubborn?

Do you always attack people who don't see things the way you do?


What do you think the formula is for force bud?

I assume you're referring to F=ma. But there's more to it than that. On, earth, if you're holding a bar with a non zero mass, but not accelerating it ( ie a = 0 ), you're still apply a force that's equal to mg. The work done when raising a weight is work done against gravity. The work that's done has nothing to do with how fast it's accelerated. Raising 1 pound 10 feet is the same as the work done in raising 10 pounds 1 foot, or raising 5 pounds 2 feet.

CrazyK
04-28-2009, 09:53 PM
What work in the physical sense doesn't mean anything? You've proved my point.How about we use some plain old fashioned common sense?

Two lifters, one is 6'0'' 150 lbs. and is paired in the same lifting class as another lifter who is 6'0'' 300 lbs. Does this make sense to you what so ever?

Xellarz
04-28-2009, 09:56 PM
If he's that tall...shouldn't his arch be massive? The short guys can't arch that much...it's unfair! hahahaha

BigTallOx
04-28-2009, 09:56 PM
Two lifters, one is 6'0'' 150 lbs. and is paired in the same lifting class as another lifter who is 6'0'' 300 lbs. Does this make sense to you what so ever?

Yes, the person who's 6'0" 150 hasn't trained as hard or eaten as much. They can change that, much more than the 6'8" 320 pound guy can change how long there limbs are compared to the 5'8" 320 pound guy.

CrazyK
04-28-2009, 09:58 PM
Yes, the person who's 6'0" 150 hasn't trained as hard or eaten as much. They can change that, much more than the 6'8" 320 pound guy can change how long there limbs are compared to the 5'8" 320 pound guy.Wow. Why can't the 6'8'' guy eat more to fill out his frame to be in proportion to the smaller guy? (And would thus have a larger advantage?)

Sometimes you just have to realize that maybe you have to work a little harder at a sport because of the cards God dealt you. How many 5'5'' guys do you see in the NBA?

BigTallOx
04-28-2009, 10:08 PM
Wow. Why can't the 6'8'' guy eat more to fill out his frame to be in proportion to the smaller guy? (And would thus have a larger advantage?)


That's what I'm doing.



Sometimes you just have to realize that maybe you have to work a little harder at a sport because of the cards God dealt you.


You telling me that. LOL that's funny. I work hard.


How many 5'5'' guys do you see in the NBA?

That analogy really doesn't hold, because the intention of powerlifting feds is to equalize things by weight. My premise is that weight only equalizes it with everything else being equal.

Travis Bell
04-28-2009, 10:10 PM
Do you always attack people who don't see things the way you do?

LOL How am I attacking you? I'm simply pointing out some flaws in your reasoning. I honestly was just surprised that you feel you work harder than anyone just because you are tall. I apologize if my statements seemed to be attacking you.



I assume you're referring to F=ma. But there's more to it than that. On, earth, if you're holding a bar with a non zero mass, but not accelerating it ( ie a = 0 ), you're still apply a force that's equal to mg. The work done when raising a weight is work done against gravity. The work that's done has nothing to do with how fast it's accelerated. Raising 1 pound 10 feet is the same as the work done in raising 10 pounds 1 foot, or raising 5 pounds 2 feet.

Well that's close, but not quite. Yes I was referring to F=ma. If you're going to calculate work you have to first calculate the force. I was focusing on the m part (mass).

Lifter A moves a higher mass at a faster acceleration (than lifter B) so he produces more force, which is going to effect the amount of work done.

So if Lifter B moves a lower mass at a slower acceleration (than lifter A) he's producing less force, which again will effect the total amount of work done.

Your concerns about height and whatnot are moot. No matter how tall you are (within reason) there is a point where it all evens out because of the actual weight moved.

I mean honestly BTO, lets look at what you're saying. By your reasoning, you work harder than Ryan Kennelly does when he benches 1076lbs. Does that sound right? Or you work harder than Vlad did when he squatted 1250 (both of whom are over 6' tall)

But in a real world answer to your question (does actual work done not matter) the answer would be no. Powerlifting is about the weight you move. End of story. How many lbs/kgs you can move in one day. Nobody really cares about any of that other stuff, even though physics speaking I'm correct.

JK1
04-28-2009, 10:12 PM
I weighed in at a svelt 339 tonight. I make up for my height deficiencies with volume.


BTO, I don't know you dude, but seriously man, quit worrying about the height thing. I've been sorta pissed at my mother for 30+ years because she's the reason I'm not 6 feet tall. Dadgummed short genes. She had to give them to me.

Get under the bar, work hard and be the strongest person that you possible can be. Coulda, woulda, shoulda are words that powerlifters don't need in their vocabulary. You either lift the weight or you don't. Don't make excuses. If you don't lift the weight, its for one simple reason, you aren't strong enough. You fix the problem by getting stronger. Keep it simple. It'll make life a whole lot easier.

vdizenzo
04-29-2009, 05:44 AM
Rhodes never seems to complain, well, at least about his height.

Lones Green
04-29-2009, 06:48 AM
Yeah, this isn't really the sport to complain about your leverages. If you feel you have it that bad off, you'd be good for basketball! haha

Athos
04-29-2009, 07:23 AM
You could always take some inspiration from another tall man - Gary Heisey, who was 6'7" seemed to do pretty well for himself. He had a 925 record deadlift that stood for many years. Being tall didn't stop him, if I remember correctly, in addition to his massive deadlift, he squatted over 770 and benched somewhere north of 430 in 1988 (with a 38" sleeve length).

=Travis=
04-29-2009, 07:36 AM
BTO - seriously, I've never opened my mouth to deliberately flame someone, but they are right. All you do is bitch and moan about how tall you are and how big of a problem that is for you. Just SHUT THE F*** UP AND LIFT and stop being such a pussy.

My brother grew up with Luekemia back in the day when they didn't know **** about how to deal with it. They now say the treatments stunted his growth, messed up his bones and just basically jacked him up but hey, he is the only survivor from his hospital from back then. Today's patients get sedatives for their spinal taps and bone marrow tests instead getting a towel to bite on like he did. But you know what, he was tired of being a 150# kid so he lifted and got big. He never once whined about how he grew up in a hospital with cancer or how the treatments messed up his bones or how he is short because of it. Grow up and stop being such a bitch.

=Travis=
04-29-2009, 07:48 AM
Brad Gillingham is 6'5" and has won several IPF championships so shut the **** up

Brad08
04-29-2009, 07:57 AM
6'4" is not 6'8". ( I bet I've got a foot longer wingspan than any 6'4" guy ) But I am a powerlifter because for some unknown reason deep down inside I know it's what I need to do. And I love it even though I'll always be handicaped at competitions because how they are structured. Sometimes it's discouraging givien my leverages and ROM.

LMFAO!

Brad Gillingham is 6'5 and smashes weights in the IPF. Guess the 3" you've got on him really make or break you. LMAO

For every long, tall lanky guy like you, there are plenty of scrawny 6' guys with thin chest cavities, stick legs, and long monkey arms. There's plenty of whining to be had about "leverages" and "ROM".

Perhaps they should make a new division for guys like you? Call it, the "handicapped by God" division. It will be filled with about 95% of the competitors out there.

You're coming across as a real sad sack. STFU and SFW!

=Travis=
04-29-2009, 08:00 AM
David Prowse (the guy who played Darth Vader) is 6' 7" and lifted the famous Dinnie Stones in Scotland. Trust me, 750 pounds on rings is tougher than 750 pounds on a bar. http://gordondinnie.com/Lifts.html

tnathletics2b
04-29-2009, 08:45 AM
BTO,

Your work = force x distance formula is flawed. If you return the weight to the same point it started at, no work is actually done. In addition, the work/energy relationship states that work can also be calculated as the change in kinetic energy. Moving a bar from the rack back to the rack does not change it's kinetic energy (or gravitational potential energy, if you want to cover all bases) one bit- it is exactly where it started.

In summary:
-Net work = 0.
-Why? The bar is returned to the same place.
-Everyone does the same amount of work at a powerlifting competition. None.
-Don't confuse "working" out with the actual physics definition of "work."

Sorry to burst your bubble, but as a powerlifter who has a dual degree in Mathematics and Physics :study:, I thought I would let you know so that ridiculous point could stop being thrown around.

vdizenzo
04-29-2009, 09:21 AM
Guys let's get back on topic or I am going to close the thread. I think everyone made their point to BTO.

ACaslow
04-29-2009, 10:58 AM
Guys let's get back on topic or I am going to close the thread. I think everyone made their point to BTO.

:soapbox:

I actually find some of this stuff good.
I think some guys are demonstrating their frustration with BTO a bit harshly but there are good points in there....

Jeeeeeeez Vdizenzo, what a baby you are....:clown: j/k

vdizenzo
04-29-2009, 12:46 PM
:soapbox:

I actually find some of this stuff good.
I think some guys are demonstrating their frustration with BTO a bit harshly but there are good points in there....

Jeeeeeeez Vdizenzo, what a baby you are....:clown: j/k

It gets counterproductive after a dozen or so posts.

Travis Bell
04-29-2009, 01:09 PM
It gets counterproductive after a dozen or so posts.

Agreed. I believe we've demonstrated our point with BTO.

Honestly, it was late at night so I was bored and felt like thinking a little. But Vincent is right, time to move onwards.

Further comments regarding height is fine as it does pertain to the issue of weight classes I guess, just keep them non directed.

EatMyWay2TheTop
04-30-2009, 03:27 AM
I don't really like the cutting weight thing. I find it pretty silly to have the best 220-pound squatter of all time being 245-250 when he did it. Doesnt make sense to me. Im not mad at people doing it, you're playing by the rules and thats fine.

MPB
05-01-2009, 12:00 PM
I used to wrestle in h.s. and on the day of wrestling meet, what they do is if you make weight in the morning (7am), then they give you 3 extra pounds you can gain right before the match. I think something like that would be a good idea for those who think losing an extreme amount of water weight and gaining it back is unfair. I don't have a problem with it though. It happens everywhere.. mma, wrestling, any combat sport, even olympic weightlifting.