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View Full Version : Ok, so. Working in GPP section as well... =/



brock7142
05-05-2009, 11:10 AM
I first posted in Power lifting, then was told body building was where I wanted to be, now GPP is the recommended, so I'll just work off all three.

I need the aerobic endurance of maxing the 27-30y/o APFT standards found on google
77+ PU in two minutes, 82+ SU in two minutes, and than a 14:00 two mile time. That's the Aerobic Endurance I need. but on top of that, I want to build myself to a 350lbs Bench max, 320lbs incline, squat max of roughly 300-400lbs.

I know I'm going to have to trade some stuff around, but those are the Anerobic and Aerobic physical fitness stats I personally want to aim for as my goal.

If anything a Squat Max of 250-300 would be good. I have full access to a gym, and full access to my school workout room (until June, and than the Gym until I leave for Job Corps)

any info would be great.

Any input on how I can train myself to meeting this goal of physical fitness, would be great.

All expertise is welcome between Power Lifters, Body Builders, and GPPs.

thank you!

KingJustin
05-05-2009, 11:35 AM
Those are tough, but attainable goals. For the Air Force push-up test, are you allowed to stop and restart?

Anyway, the bench is really the hardest part, and you're relatively close already.

I would do crossfitfootball.com workouts as prescribed, but add in a 5k run or row every 2 weeks, and add in tabata sit-ups on Saturdays. Maybe add in tabata push-ups every now and then once you feel like you're recovering sufficiently.

Also, I gave a little more details in the Marine boot camp thread.

Edit: Oh ****, you weigh 322 lbs. You need to start dieting very hard. Look up intermittent (protein-sparing-modified) fasting I guess. PSMF+Refeed.

tnathletics2b
05-05-2009, 11:41 AM
For your mile time, practice running up to 3-5 miles at a time. When you are able to run 5 miles, running 2 @ a 7 minute pace won't even break a sweat. For you pushups and situps, do a set of 30 or 40 every commercial break or find a conference room to bust out some sets while at work. The only real way to get better at pushups and situps is to do pushups and situps till you can't do them anymore. The only way to increase your squats and anything else is to lift heavy and hard. Buy a belt to help support your back, throw some weight on there and have it. You also need to complement your squats with deadlifts. They are basically flip sides of the same coin and will nail every muscle in your legs and must in your upper body. I personally wouldn't worry a whole lot about the incline bench... I have never heard of anyone "maxing out" on incline and it certaintly isn't a competition lift. Mix in some barbell bench to work out all your stabilizer muscles in your shoulders and pecs.

And I just noticed your age/height/weight. You are going to have to lose a lot of weight to be able to break a 7 minute mile pace. I'd say probably at least 50 pounds. There is a reason Olympic runners are 5'6" and weigh 110 pounds. Now your sprinters have big legs- but sprints are power oriented- it's apple and oranges.

You need to run every day to bring 18:11 down to 14:00.

Good luck.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 12:41 PM
Those are tough, but attainable goals. For the Air Force push-up test, are you allowed to stop and restart?

Anyway, the bench is really the hardest part, and you're relatively close already.

I would do crossfitfootball.com workouts as prescribed, but add in a 5k run or row every 2 weeks, and add in tabata sit-ups on Saturdays. Maybe add in tabata push-ups every now and then once you feel like you're recovering sufficiently.

Also, I gave a little more details in the Marine boot camp thread.

Edit: Oh ****, you weigh 322 lbs. You need to start dieting very hard. Look up intermittent (protein-sparing-modified) fasting I guess. PSMF+Refeed.


I have an 18 1/2'' neck, with 42'' stomach, and 56'' chest. I'm good to go weight wise, definitely good to go.

I hope to go Army Infantry, so any PT that can get me bigger, stronger, and faster is good PT :) and I"ll definitely look into that site

brock7142
05-05-2009, 12:43 PM
For your mile time, practice running up to 3-5 miles at a time. When you are able to run 5 miles, running 2 @ a 7 minute pace won't even break a sweat. For you pushups and situps, do a set of 30 or 40 every commercial break or find a conference room to bust out some sets while at work. The only real way to get better at pushups and situps is to do pushups and situps till you can't do them anymore. The only way to increase your squats and anything else is to lift heavy and hard. Buy a belt to help support your back, throw some weight on there and have it. You also need to complement your squats with deadlifts. They are basically flip sides of the same coin and will nail every muscle in your legs and must in your upper body. I personally wouldn't worry a whole lot about the incline bench... I have never heard of anyone "maxing out" on incline and it certaintly isn't a competition lift. Mix in some barbell bench to work out all your stabilizer muscles in your shoulders and pecs.

And I just noticed your age/height/weight. You are going to have to lose a lot of weight to be able to break a 7 minute mile pace. I'd say probably at least 50 pounds. There is a reason Olympic runners are 5'6" and weigh 110 pounds. Now your sprinters have big legs- but sprints are power oriented- it's apple and oranges.

You need to run every day to bring 18:11 down to 14:00.

Good luck.

one thing I've been looking into, and doing for the PU and SU is the hundredpushups.com and the twohundredsitups.com.

But I'm definitely looking into that.

Thank you everyone for the input! =)

tnathletics2b
05-05-2009, 12:48 PM
I have an 18 1/2'' neck, with 42'' stomach, and 56'' chest. I'm good to go weight wise, definitely good to go.

A guy that weighs 322 pounds... most likely impossible to run 2 miles at 14:00 minute pace. I don't care how muscular you are. Muscle might even make it harder.

Plus, to be honest, you can't be that muscular if you are only doing bodyweight bench press for max...

Put it into perspective. I weigh 215 pounds. If I maxed out at 220 pounds- not that great at all. But you can say 350 pounds and it's like "Whoooaaaa 350 pounds!" EXCEPT that it is your basically your bodyweight. Same thing as me saying 220. A guy weighing 322 pounds benching 350 and wanting a max squat of a
Squat Max of 250-300 would be good ain't going to be that muscular.

Plus, how many infantry men you see weiging 322 pounds? NONE.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 12:51 PM
A guy that weighs 322 pounds... most likely impossible to run 2 miles at 14:00 minute pace. I don't care how muscular you are. Muscle might even make it harder.

Plus, to be honest, you can't be that muscular if you are only doing bodyweight bench press for max...

Put it into perspective. I weigh 215 pounds. If I maxed out at 220 pounds- not that great at all. But you can say 350 pounds and it's like "Whoooaaaa 350 pounds!" EXCEPT that it is your basically your bodyweight. Same thing as me saying 220. A guy weighing 322 pounds benching 350 and wanting a max squat of a ain't going to be that muscular.

Plus, how many infantry men you see weiging 322 pounds? NONE.

I know, I plan on cutting more and more bodyweight. I'll lose all that as I go.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 12:52 PM
I want to get my body to the last level of physical fitness I was at.

In summer 2007, I used to be 283lbs with roughly 18% body fat. THAT is what I want to be at again. Right now I'm roughly at 25%

=Travis=
05-05-2009, 12:57 PM
From your other thread:


77+ PU in two minutes, 82+ SU in two minutes, and than a 14:00 two mile time. That's the Aerobic Endurance I need. but on top of that, I want to build myself to a 350lbs Bench max, 320lbs incline, squat max of roughly 300-400lbs.

One, if you got a specific goal in mind, do it and do it some more. If you want 77+ PU, start by doing them and keep doing them until you get what you need.


Now, you WILL NOT get a squat max of 300-400 pounds unless you SQUAT

J.C.
05-05-2009, 01:13 PM
I think that you're maybe going about this wrong.

322lbs is f'in huge for a 19yr old, even if you are 6'4. I'm surprised you can do a single pushup to be honest.

If the test is all about bodyweight exercise and general physical preparedness (gpp) then surely you need to be running and doing push-ups and sit-ups? The weights would be nice, but lets think priorities here. If you want to pass the test, then focus on the test.

I'd start doing bodyweight circuits. Circuits are killers to begin with but you get good fast which is always encouraging. Do something like 20 pushups, 20 sit-ups, 20 burpees, 20 ski-jumps over a plank or something, a short sprint and start again. Do this for 5min at first. Work up to two lots of 20mins. By that time you should feel incredibly fit and you should be a lot thinner. It will bring up your pushu-ups and situps and make running easier.

If you wanted to do weights as well, then you could try and mix bodyweight circuit training with crossfit.

J.C.
05-05-2009, 01:16 PM
Hey, I just found out that I gave similar advice to Tom in your other thread. Always a good sign. Tom Mutaffis is a man who knows his stuff.

So yeah, run and circuit train and diet.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 01:25 PM
I'll be going to the gym in a little bit.

A circuit I've been getting feedback on:

PUs one minute (as many as possible in that minute timeframe)
Sit-ups one minute
Squats one minute
PUs one minute
crunches one minute
jack knives one minute
PUs one minute
Flutter kicks one minute
scissors one minute
PUs on eminute
DIPs one minute
Pull-ups one minute
crunches two minutes
sit-ups two minutes
jack knives two minutes
Crunches three minutes
Done

That's a circuit I was just told via PM a few moments ago.

ZenMonkey
05-05-2009, 01:30 PM
You are not going to find a circuit that is the "end all be all" of circuits. That is actually contradictory to circuit training. You need to have variations day to day if you want to increase your GPP.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 01:31 PM
You are not going to find a circuit that is the "end all be all" of circuits. That is actually contradictory to circuit training. You need to have variations day to day if you want to increase your GPP.

I plan too

I plan on taking this circuit as my Aerobic for the day + a running routine afterwards, and then get some time dedicated to other types of workouts.

I hope to put in 2 hours+ a day working out between Aerobic, Cardio, and anaerobic.

ZenMonkey
05-05-2009, 01:43 PM
I plan too

I plan on taking this circuit as my Aerobic for the day + a running routine afterwards, and then get some time dedicated to other types of workouts.

I hope to put in 2 hours+ a day working out between Aerobic, Cardio, and anaerobic.

Thats a bad idea. If I were you Id do this:
(SS=Starting Strength Routine)

M- SS
T-GPP
W-SS
TH-GPP
F-SS
S- Optional GPP or OFF
S-OFF

Follow the SS WO with 15-20 minutes cardio.

GPP should only last about 30-45 minutes



And I think you misunderstood my post. Your GPP/circuit needs to have variations. This is what I used to do:

Id make a list of about 12 different things (KB swings, plyos, tire flip, hammer swings, sprints, etc...) Then roll a pair of dice and for each roll you align that total with the numbered exercise. You can do multiple rolls for multiple exercises of just roll once and give serious concentration to that particular exrcise. You can do the same with a deck of cards.

If you want to run more then you can follow up your GPP with 15-20 cardio, but Id cut the GPP short if you decide to do that.


Id try just working out/GPP 5 days a week until you can guage your recovery. You must understand that for something like this routine setup to work you need to have a very good grasp on how your body deals with such an extreme workload insofar as recovery is concerned.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 01:56 PM
Thats a bad idea. If I were you Id do this:
(SS=Starting Strength Routine)

M- SS
T-GPP
W-SS
TH-GPP
F-SS
S- Optional GPP or OFF
S-OFF

Follow the SS WO with 15-20 minutes cardio.

GPP should only last about 30-45 minutes



And I think you misunderstood my post. Your GPP/circuit needs to have variations. This is what I used to do:

Id make a list of about 12 different things (KB swings, plyos, tire flip, hammer swings, sprints, etc...) Then roll a pair of dice and for each roll you align that total with the numbered exercise. You can do multiple rolls for multiple exercises of just roll once and give serious concentration to that particular exrcise. You can do the same with a deck of cards.

If you want to run more then you can follow up your GPP with 15-20 cardio, but Id cut the GPP short if you decide to do that.


Id try just working out/GPP 5 days a week until you can guage your recovery. You must understand that for something like this routine setup to work you need to have a very good grasp on how your body deals with such an extreme workload insofar as recovery is concerned.

THank you, I never gave that much thought.

I greatly appreciate it!

KingJustin
05-05-2009, 02:15 PM
Yeah, ZenMonkey's advice is good here.

But, really, his advice is very similar to just doing the CrossFit workout as prescribed, and with the CF workouts there is less of a chance that you'll do stuff wrong.


Also, if your max bench is 350 lbs, and you weigh 322 lbs, but you can do 54 push-ups (and 52 sit-ups), then I find it hard to believe that you're using a full Range of Motion. But, who knows, maybe you can get away with this in the Air Force.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 02:29 PM
Yeah, ZenMonkey's advice is good here.

But, really, his advice is very similar to just doing the CrossFit workout as prescribed, and with the CF workouts there is less of a chance that you'll do stuff wrong.


Also, if your max bench is 350 lbs, and you weigh 322 lbs, but you can do 54 push-ups (and 52 sit-ups), then I find it hard to believe that you're using a full Range of Motion. But, who knows, maybe you can get away with this in the Air Force.

I'd rather be shot than to go into the Air Force.

I'm going Army, something I've noticed, is as my BP goes up, my Aerobic endurance for doing PU go down. I'm just now getting back up from 28, used to do 68 PU, then knocked down to 28, now back to 54. (In a two minute period no less =/...)

I go all the way down to my chest, (I "tap" my chest, not bounce, but tap)

My thin with Crossfit, is I'm not "At that level" i.e. I can't do Pyramid Push-ups. (where you have your entire body vertically from the ground, and do "Push-ups" I don't have that kind of strength.)

ZenMonkey
05-05-2009, 02:43 PM
If you spend your life waiting to get to "that level" you are going to be waiting alot.

Justin is right. CF is probably the best bet for you at this point unless you have serious desire to get stronger at general movements like pressing and squatting.

Sensei
05-05-2009, 04:56 PM
You have specific goals to prepare for... I'd suggest the bulk of (ALMOST ALL OF) your work go into those until you are much closer to numbers you need to hit. If you need a break, fine - do something else for a week here and there, but you need to do push-ups, sit-ups, and running (pull-ups?). As mentioned, dropping 40lbs will make those goals A LOT easier.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 05:43 PM
You have specific goals to prepare for... I'd suggest the bulk of (ALMOST ALL OF) your work go into those until you are much closer to numbers you need to hit. If you need a break, fine - do something else for a week here and there, but you need to do push-ups, sit-ups, and running (pull-ups?). As mentioned, dropping 40lbs will make those goals A LOT easier.

I whole heartedly agree with you.

KingJustin
05-05-2009, 06:05 PM
The thing is that even though the Army Personal Fitness Test might be something he can train for, the rest of boot camp is going to be a lot like CrossFit. In the Marines, I know my OSO told me that they basically train by doing CrossFit without the strength work. So, yeah, you can get ready for your PFT, but that's not going to help a whole lot when you actually have to go through boot camp and do a lot of other stuff. Not to mention, he's 322 lbs. His joints are not going to appreciate him running a lot.

There's a _LOT_ of military guys that do CrossFit that maxed out their PFT's and maintain good strength.

Anyway, as I said in the other thread, if you just want to bump up your push-up/sit-up numbers, then use the Tabata method.

WillNoble
05-05-2009, 06:09 PM
The thing is that even though the Army Personal Fitness Test might be something he can train for, the rest of boot camp is going to be a lot like CrossFit. In the Marines, I know my OSO told me that they basically train by doing CrossFit without the strength work. So, yeah, you can get ready for your PFT, but that's not going to help a whole lot when you actually have to go through boot camp and do a lot of other stuff. Not to mention, he's 322 lbs. His joints are not going to appreciate him running a lot.

There's a _LOT_ of military guys that do CrossFit that maxed out their PFT's and maintain good strength.

Anyway, as I said in the other thread, if you just want to bump up your push-up/sit-up numbers, then use the Tabata method.

Justin this is one of the few times you are going to hear me pimp crossfit, but in this kids case it is most certainly appropriate

vdizenzo
05-05-2009, 06:26 PM
Tabata is great.

brock7142
05-05-2009, 06:38 PM
Tabata is great.

I'll start working in crossfit, and look into this Tabata thing