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View Full Version : Can some people who know what they're talking about give me some advice?



dolphin
05-19-2009, 02:57 AM
Im 5.7", 61 Kgs. Im just starting on Rippletoes Starting Strength, I havent got the book yet (its in the post) just wondering...

Firstly... I did a search but couldnt really find on here a good calculation to figure out my more or less maintenance. If someone has a link that would be cool.

Second... I hear alot of people saying EAT everything (probably in shock after seeing my weight) but should I go all out or just 500 calories over maintainence (maybe 1000 just to be safe)

Third... What ratio of Prot, Carb, Fat should I be going for? 40%prot 50%carb 10%fat???

Thanks for your advice in advance. Im very serious about getting my **** together.

thegreatone
05-19-2009, 03:13 AM
Im 5.7", 61 Kgs. Im just starting on Rippletoes Starting Strength, I havent got the book yet (its in the post) just wondering...

Firstly... I did a search but couldnt really find on here a good calculation to figure out my more or less maintenance. If someone has a link that would be cool.

http://www.freedieting.com/tools/calorie_calculator.htm#

Second... I hear alot of people saying EAT everything (probably in shock after seeing my weight) but should I go all out or just 500 calories over maintainence (maybe 1000 just to be safe)

15-20% surplus to start should be good. 1000 over will probably just make you fat. Go maint + 20% for 2 weeks and see if you start going up if not add 100-150 for another week or so and con't till your weight begins to increase

Third... What ratio of Prot, Carb, Fat should I be going for? 40%prot 50%carb 10%fat???

Thanks for your advice in advance. Im very serious about getting my **** together.

Don't worry about Marco %. Get 1.5g/lb BW Pro, .4-.5g/lb BW Fat & fill in with Carbs



I know a gallon of milk a day if often recommended with SS but I wouldn't do that it will probably just cause excess BF. If you are just trying to increase BW and don't care if it's fat you could give that a try though.

Joe Black
05-19-2009, 03:42 AM
Ok, heres the thing on maintenence, it can vary massively between indidivuals so I don't think a calculation you find online is going to give you an accurate number. It's going to use standard things like age, weight, how often you workout etc to determine the number and as you already know this could be way off depending on your metabolism.

The best thing to do to find your maintenence rate is to write down EVERYTHING you eat for 7 days. Keep your diet and training normal (and therefore consistent with what it would normally be) and write down everything that has any calories in it.

Then total up the calories (this is a great database - http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/) and divide by 7 and that should give you a good per day starting number which will be pretty close to your maintanence rate.

Now, this is all assuming that currently you are maintaining your bodyweight with what you are doing, which is normally the case with anyone due to start a new program. Either way, it's going to be better than using some online calculator.

Add 500 calories onto that number and see how you get on for two weeks. If nothing changes, add on another 250. If nothing changes after a couple of weeks add on another 250. Keep doing this until you start gaining weight.

Now, if you think you are undereating massively right now and you have a very fast metabolism, you could go with adding 1000 onto the number and then go up 500 per week, I'll leave for you to decide :)

This might be a slower way of calculating your maintenence rate, but I definately think is it the most accurate and best way to go.

J.C.
05-19-2009, 06:30 AM
Daniel offers great advice, but considering your weight and inexperience I'd recommend differently.

Too much management is counter-productive. Learning to calorie count and track your diet are useful skills and ones that you may need further on down the line when you get older or fatter or have really specific goals. But right now you're likely to confuse yourself with ratios, grams of this and that, correct sources etc etc. It can all get too much.

Simply be aware of what you're eating, and start looking at food labels. Start to absorb these things. Increase the amount you are eating each meal. So cook more rice or more pasta or a couple more potatoes, whatever. Eat an extra can of tuna. Choose red meat over poultry. Whole milk instead of skimmed. Snack on nuts. Little changes can yield a big overall calorie difference. If you are not gaining noticeable size or weight then eat some more, if you feel you are gaining too much fat then cut down on some milk or carbs.

Its good to be serious about everything but just don't get overwhelmed. Over time you'll find things will start to fall into place.

Also, once you get into Starting Strength then add 1000 calories right off the bat. That will get things moving. :)

dolphin
05-19-2009, 06:45 AM
thanks for the positive comments.

The thing is, even if I eat under my maintenance I dont lose much weight as there isnt barely any to lose.

I've opted for three big meals and three big shakes each day, plus snacks throughout. I will keep track of calories, protein etc as I go so I can do as you guys suggest.


Thanks again, any more tips would be great.

Joe Black
05-19-2009, 07:02 AM
And even though drummer suggested something different to me, I actually agree with him lol. It can be a bit too much if you are just getting into things.

Stick with 3 big meals and 3 shakes and try and stay consistent with that. Drummers tips for food choices are good and will help you get those extra calories. Consistency is the most important thing (and that doesn;t mean counting calories, just trying to eat roughly the same each day) because if you then don't get the results you want, you know you can stick on 500 or 1000 and try again. If your daily calories are jumping in variants of 500-1000 every day, you don't have something to even measure that doesn't work!

VikingWarlord
05-19-2009, 09:49 AM
The thing is, even if I eat under my maintenance I dont lose much weight as there isnt barely any to lose.

Bull****. There might not be much FAT, but there's always WEIGHT to lose. Just eat. Take measurements and photos regularly. If you're gaining too quickly and putting on too much fat, eat a little less.

Gaining weight isn't anywhere near as difficult as losing it.

MadScientist
05-19-2009, 10:31 AM
Right on drummer

I always tell people

"Too much micromanagement is counterproductive"

I tell them that for everything, lifting, life, work, etc.

Bodybuilding is more about giving 100% effort/intensity, consistently, than anything else.

If you are always giving 80% effort, you will always get, at most, 80% results; no matter what you eat, drink, sleep, take.


Heres another one : "Excellence is nothing more than consistent mediocrity"

Consistent and intense workouts 3-4 times per week will ALWAYS be superior to a regime of working out intensely here and there, skipping workouts, skipping meals, and then trying to make them up by working out longer or harder.

Stick to it.

Bodybuilding isnt about learning a myriad of complicated moves, it is about unlearning all the false ideas and assumptions and learning to recruit every available muscle fiber to lift progressively heavier weights while performing basic and natural feeling movements.

As you lift heavier weights in the 1-5 rep range, you will gain strength and also grow some, and also be able to lift heavier weights in the 8-12 rep range, stimulating even more muscle.