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Whitebread
06-02-2009, 09:59 PM
I'd like to go try a carb cycling diet but the articles I've mentioned make no mention of total calories consumed during the day. Adjusting macros according to LBM seems like the way to go, but am I supposed to stay under maintenance on high, low and no carb days? Should I eat the same amount of calories every day?

Thanks.

Malice
06-03-2009, 05:20 AM
Tom Mutafis (sorry if this is incorrect spelling) wrote an excellent article on carb cycling a few months back, not sure if it was sticked ill take a look for it for you.

malkore
06-03-2009, 10:28 AM
calories stay the same. its the carbs that dip, and you make up for that with increased protein and fats (esp. healthy fats)

Tom Mutaffis
06-03-2009, 11:10 AM
I'd like to go try a carb cycling diet but the articles I've mentioned make no mention of total calories consumed during the day. Adjusting macros according to LBM seems like the way to go, but am I supposed to stay under maintenance on high, low and no carb days? Should I eat the same amount of calories every day?

Thanks.

My thoughts on this are that it would depend on what you are really looking to do in terms of goals. Another huge factor is what you are actually eating. Low carb foods will generally have more fat (unless you are simply talking about lean protein sources) and since fat is 9 calories per gram compared to 4 calories per gram for carbs - it is easy to have your calories bump up a bit. Since you are not going into full ketosis like with a low carb diet then keeping your calories in check may be more important; whereas overall low carb diets do not focus much on calories.

Calories make the difference in bodyweight, lean body mass and body composition are directly related to what you are eating - not how much.

Depending on how many low carb days you are doing you may want to slightly bump the calories on those days to help keep energy levels stable, and also increase protein intake.

Something that I am experimenting with is caloric cycling. This can help to keep you in a calorie deficit for the week (lose weight) but you can also fuel training with 1-2 high calorie days. Low calorie days would obviously be low carb as well - but the overall focus on the program is on a different factor. Carbs are not counted on the re-feed days.

What is your overall goal with this diet? Maybe there is a better plan out there that can help to meet all of your objectives without having to feel like a science expriement where you are measuring, weighing, and counting everything that you eat.



Tom Mutafis (sorry if this is incorrect spelling) wrote an excellent article on carb cycling a few months back, not sure if it was sticked ill take a look for it for you.

I actually did not write that article but did post quite a bit of information from another resource. Good memory.

Whitebread
06-03-2009, 06:53 PM
My thoughts on this are that it would depend on what you are really looking to do in terms of goals. Another huge factor is what you are actually eating. Low carb foods will generally have more fat (unless you are simply talking about lean protein sources) and since fat is 9 calories per gram compared to 4 calories per gram for carbs - it is easy to have your calories bump up a bit. Since you are not going into full ketosis like with a low carb diet then keeping your calories in check may be more important; whereas overall low carb diets do not focus much on calories.

Calories make the difference in bodyweight, lean body mass and body composition are directly related to what you are eating - not how much.

Depending on how many low carb days you are doing you may want to slightly bump the calories on those days to help keep energy levels stable, and also increase protein intake.

Something that I am experimenting with is caloric cycling. This can help to keep you in a calorie deficit for the week (lose weight) but you can also fuel training with 1-2 high calorie days. Low calorie days would obviously be low carb as well - but the overall focus on the program is on a different factor. Carbs are not counted on the re-feed days.

What is your overall goal with this diet? Maybe there is a better plan out there that can help to meet all of your objectives without having to feel like a science expriement where you are measuring, weighing, and counting everything that you eat.




I actually did not write that article but did post quite a bit of information from another resource. Good memory.

Tom,
I don't have well defined goals at the moment. Because I don't know my body fat %, and because I do not want to compete (if that hasn't already been made apparent), I just wanted to cut until I was satisfied with what I saw in the mirror.
I went searching through the members pics threads to find someone similar in body composition and I found a close match:
here (http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=27357&d=1241913428)
I'm a bit larger and a bit leaner than him, so hopefully you can make an inference from this information.

Based on other people Ive seen, I'd like to drop to about 10%.

icnelly
06-03-2009, 11:23 PM
Tom Mutafis (sorry if this is incorrect spelling) wrote an excellent article on carb cycling a few months back, not sure if it was sticked ill take a look for it for you.

This thread could be it: Looking for A Good Carb Cycling Article (http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/showthread.php?t=123532&highlight=carb+cycling).

Whitebread
06-04-2009, 05:20 PM
So the article Tom posted seems to suggest that calories should not be kept constant, or even below maintenance. It also implies that any amount of carbs can be eaten on the high carb day and none on the no/low day. Other pages I've read have suggested keeping calories below maintenance for the week, some suggest some carbs on the low/no day, and others suggest that calories must always be below maintenance and protein and fats vary to make up the difference when carbs dip. Some say the keep fat intake high, some say keep it low, others say vary it.

There's quite a bit of differing advice so what I've decided to do is take a guess at my maintenance calories and design a weekly diet based around a constant daily caloric intake that leaves me in 20% deficit (based on my estimations). Protein intake is constant across the week and carbs and fats vary to make up the difference. I'm going to weigh out my food as best as I can and track my intake on fitday and see what happens. It just occurred to me that I will never be able to make a really good diet up from the get go so I figure experimentation is the best say to go about this.

icnelly
06-04-2009, 05:41 PM
1.) There's quite a bit of differing advice so what I've decided to do is take a guess at my maintenance calories and design a weekly diet based around a constant daily caloric intake that leaves me in 20% deficit (based on my estimations).

2.) It just occurred to me that I will never be able to make a really good diet up from the get go so I figure experimentation is the best say to go about this.

1. The carb cycling plan laid out in the article stated it wasn't to be obssessed/worried over. The auther believes in the self-regulating principle of the body. I can't do that yet; I need to be quite careful given my history. From what I remember the plan does not really put any numeric limits on macro percentages or caloric limit, so if you're uneasy with that and new to figuring out this sort of information, then use that as your base and plan accordingly.

Check out the AHA's Calculator (http://www.myfatstranslator.com/) (it's a ballpark guesstimator). Fitday.com has a similar way of figuring out calorie requirements. I don't know my maintainence level, but I consistenly lose around 1 kilo per week at 2600-2700 cals while working out 3-5 days a week. I can easily "guess" how much I should change my nutrition depending on my goal. Once you get some time with the numbers, you'll be able to better track and manipulate variables, and incorporate information.

2.) Bingo...Just make sure its helpful experimentation: take notes, and be consistent.

Whitebread
06-04-2009, 08:12 PM
Thanks icnelly.