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View Full Version : Something I really don't get with losing weight



SHU327
06-15-2009, 01:30 AM
Okay, so I know to lose weight you need to burn more calories then you consume. That's obviouse. But how can a normal person with a job do this?

Say I eat 2,000 calories a day, mostly healthy so not 2,000 calories by eating pizza and burgers, so that means in order to lose weight I have to burn more then 2,000 calories per day? For someone who has a 8-6 desk job with no movement, how is that even possible? Or am I all wrong about this?

fitnhealthydad
06-15-2009, 02:09 AM
It's all about setting priorities, friend. Your body is always burning calories; it's just your level of activity that determines how much it is burning over a given period. You don't have to burn 2,000 calories per day just because that's what you ate. Your body needs a portion of those calories just to survive (think of calories as fuel for your body's engine). You just want to make sure you're not consistently carrying a caloric surplus in your diet - i.e. eating far more calories than you're burning.

Not knowing what you do for work, I will say that many employers nowadays are focusing on wellness efforts as a means of maintaining a healthier employee base and, thus, a potentially cheaper insurance cost to the company. Your Human Resources department may be able to offer some direction. Do you have a fitness-reimbursement program? If you are working ten hours a day (8-6, you said? ), then I would assume you get at least a 30-minute lunch break. Is there a place where you can walk for a half-hour? Can you plan a morning jog?

Not to be a dink (honestly), but we're all "normal" people "with a job". I work 12-hour shifts as a manufacturing supervisor and I spend most of my day at a desk. I'm a single dad, as well, which isn't conducive to a lot of free time. And, yet, I managed to lose 15 pounds between February and April of this year. If you really want to do it, then you're gonna' have to motivate yourself to fit those workouts/exercises into your day. It CAN be done!

Good luck!

vdizenzo
06-15-2009, 05:32 AM
Okay, so I know to lose weight you need to burn more calories then you consume. That's obviouse. But how can a normal person with a job do this?

Say I eat 2,000 calories a day, mostly healthy so not 2,000 calories by eating pizza and burgers, so that means in order to lose weight I have to burn more then 2,000 calories per day? For someone who has a 8-6 desk job with no movement, how is that even possible? Or am I all wrong about this?

If you burned 2k calories a day your net result would be 0 calories a day. That's wrong. If you want to lose weight you simply must keep your calories lower than your maintenance level either through diet, exercise, or a combination of both. If you consistently get even 100 calories below you will lose weight. Perhaps not as quickly as you want, but you will definitely lose.

They key is consistency. Make better food choices and exercise. It can be that simple. I usually find most go all or nothing with diet and exercise and that is their downfall. Keep searching through this forum and you will find lots of good advice.

MasterBlaster56
06-15-2009, 06:09 AM
I bet a nickle that if it was a beautiful woman offering to make wild love to you 45 minutes a day every day, you'd be able to find the time - right? Approach your workout program with that same mindset! You say you work 10 hours a day - that leaves 14 hours for everything else.

deeder
06-15-2009, 06:53 AM
I work a desk job too man and I have definitely noticed my metabolism slowed down because of it. I have found that timing carbs around my upcoming activity levels is very important. For example, I usually don't have many carbs for breakfast because I know I'm heading straight to my desk to sit for 8 hours. Lunch is usually low carbs too then after work I bump the carbs to get some energy for my workouts.

Goodwinm
06-15-2009, 07:39 AM
You've got a child. Use that time effectively. Play time to lose weight!
I love going to the park with my daughter and running around like a nutter and she does the same. We have a lovely time togethor. Great for bonding and great for burning off last nights sneak into the fridge time.

Off Road
06-15-2009, 07:48 AM
You've got a child. Use that time effectively. Play time to lose weight!

I totally agree. Do all the stuff you used to do as a kid. Climb the monkey bars, do some pull ups, play tag, it's all good for you and the kids will love it.

fitnhealthydad
06-15-2009, 07:57 AM
I totally agree. Do all the stuff you used to do as a kid. Climb the monkey bars, do some pull ups, play tag, it's all good for you and the kids will love it.

(...waving hand...) The single dad was me, not the OP. Just didn't want everyone going off-track on the poor guy with the playground-with-the-kids suggestions. But you're all still making my point exactly!

Cheers!

Mercuryblade
06-15-2009, 08:53 AM
Okay, so I know to lose weight you need to burn more calories then you consume. That's obviouse. But how can a normal person with a job do this?

Say I eat 2,000 calories a day, mostly healthy so not 2,000 calories by eating pizza and burgers, so that means in order to lose weight I have to burn more then 2,000 calories per day? For someone who has a 8-6 desk job with no movement, how is that even possible? Or am I all wrong about this?

You are always burning calories, I'm guessing you're confused and are thinking you need to hop on the treadmill and get that calories number to 2000.

As far as not having time to work-out. That is an excuse that will not go very far on this board.
I'll echo what others said, and reiterate that it's all about priorities.
Interestingly enough, I had a discussion (forced, mind you) by a bunch of old drunk dudes at a graduation party who said "I used to look like you, but everything changes once you get older... you just don't have time anymore."
To which I responded that I'm working full-time, studying for the MCAT for 2-3 hours, have two crazy ass dogs that require at least an hour of intense exercise and I still manage to get my butt in the gym 4-5x a week, and when I don't get into the gym I hop on the nordic track for 30-45 minutes.

If you watch an hour of TV a day, you have more than enough time to get into the gym and get into shape.

Y2A
06-15-2009, 09:36 AM
You are always burning calories, I'm guessing you're confused and are thinking you need to hop on the treadmill and get that calories number to 2000.

This. Your body has a maintenance calorie level just to function, so you just need to find your maintenance level and reduce your intake to 500 below that number each day. For example, if those 2000 calories that you eat have been keeping you at the same weight, that is probably your maintenance so aim for 1500 or so instead and you should lose weight.

SHU327
06-15-2009, 01:14 PM
You are always burning calories, I'm guessing you're confused and are thinking you need to hop on the treadmill and get that calories number to 2000.

Yep, pretty much what I thought. That's why I was confused when people say" burn more then you take" I thought literally burn more calories then you eat per day. I'm so relieved that's not the case. lol


This. Your body has a maintenance calorie level just to function, so you just need to find your maintenance level and reduce your intake to 500 below that number each day. For example, if those 2000 calories that you eat have been keeping you at the same weight, that is probably your maintenance so aim for 1500 or so instead and you should lose weight.

How do I find my maintenance calorie level?

FootballLifter
06-15-2009, 04:01 PM
How do I find my maintenance calorie level?

I don't know if this right?
So someone please correct me if I am wrong!

But I think you need to count however many calories you eat in a day that is what is maintaining your current weight.

From there, you decide how much to decrease or increase for losing or gaining weight.

Right?

LuNa
06-15-2009, 06:49 PM
I don't know if this right?
So someone please correct me if I am wrong!

But I think you need to count however many calories you eat in a day that is what is maintaining your current weight.

From there, you decide how much to decrease or increase for losing or gaining weight.

Right?

Yep that is right. You can start out with a rough guideline by a formula or just do a guess. Eat at that level for a week and see if there are any fluctuations in your weight. If not, than that is your maintenance. Ofcourse, this amount is dependent on your activity levels and precise calorie counting, however it will give you a rough estimate.
To loose one pound a week you will have to stay 3500 calories under your maintenance. This works to 500 calories below maintenance a day. Instead of just eating less, which is often hard because it might leave you with hunger, you could exercise more to cut the calories.

Hope this helps.

SHU327
06-15-2009, 07:08 PM
I looked it up on Google and did some calculations and it says I need to consume 3417.75 calories a day to maintain weight. So basically all I have to do is eat less then this per day and I'll lose weight. I was going for around 2000-2500 calories per day, is this too low to start off?

LuNa
06-15-2009, 08:27 PM
I looked it up on Google and did some calculations and it says I need to consume 3417.75 calories a day to maintain weight. So basically all I have to do is eat less then this per day and I'll lose weight. I was going for around 2000-2500 calories per day, is this too low to start off?

If that was your real maintenance (remember calculators can be inaccurate) i would start by taking off 500. Any more could mean you are loosing muscle mass instead of fat. Whenever losses stall, you could cut your calories a bit more.

Skalami
06-16-2009, 07:35 AM
i just read this thing about the perfect calorie burning day in mens health or something. It played a lot with breaking up the sedentary hours with constant walking around, walk around as much as you can. If someone needs to deliver something do it for them, be the go to guy. Before work if possible go for a run as that sets up the calorie burning for a good few hours after. If possible to lift before your work day that would be ideal but that might not be possible.

Unreal
06-16-2009, 02:31 PM
Calculators could be way off. Track and find out. You don't want to cut too many or bad stuff happens. Start with a number, say 3000 and eat that for a week. Be strict. See what happens. If you don't lose anyweight, goto 2600 or some lower number. If 3000 works then stay there until it stops working.

Mr. Mustard
06-17-2009, 03:43 PM
(...waving hand...) The single dad was me, not the OP. Just didn't want everyone going off-track on the poor guy with the playground-with-the-kids suggestions. But you're all still making my point exactly!

Cheers!

Yeah, it would be creepy if the OP decided to go run around with kids at the local playground.

Mr. Mustard
06-17-2009, 03:47 PM
For someone who has a 8-6 desk job with no movement, how is that even possible? Or am I all wrong about this?



I sit at a desk all day too, dude. I have to be in the office at 10am but I am up everyday at 5:45 with my ass in the gym by 6:30. It sucks but you get used to it and you feel good about yourself. You have to be disicplined and you have to want it. Try it and after a week or two it will be routine and you'll think nothing of it.

Optimum08
06-18-2009, 06:57 AM
It's all about setting priorities, friend. Your body is always burning calories; it's just your level of activity that determines how much it is burning over a given period. You don't have to burn 2,000 calories per day just because that's what you ate. Your body needs a portion of those calories just to survive (think of calories as fuel for your body's engine). You just want to make sure you're not consistently carrying a caloric surplus in your diet - i.e. eating far more calories than you're burning.

Not knowing what you do for work, I will say that many employers nowadays are focusing on wellness efforts as a means of maintaining a healthier employee base and, thus, a potentially cheaper insurance cost to the company. Your Human Resources department may be able to offer some direction. Do you have a fitness-reimbursement program? If you are working ten hours a day (8-6, you said? ), then I would assume you get at least a 30-minute lunch break. Is there a place where you can walk for a half-hour? Can you plan a morning jog?

Not to be a dink (honestly), but we're all "normal" people "with a job". I work 12-hour shifts as a manufacturing supervisor and I spend most of my day at a desk. I'm a single dad, as well, which isn't conducive to a lot of free time. And, yet, I managed to lose 15 pounds between February and April of this year. If you really want to do it, then you're gonna' have to motivate yourself to fit those workouts/exercises into your day. It CAN be done!

Good luck!

:withstupi:

if you put your mind to it and are dedicated then there should be nothing in your way.

semi-rant. what people usually don't understand is that losing weight is not just 'going on a diet' or 'starting exercise', losing weight/being healthy and fit is a full-blown change in lifestyle- from what you eat to how you exercise. This is why most people go on 'diets', lose weight, feel better, then months later are back at or even heavier then they were to begin with. They lose sight that this isn't a 'battle' per say, but a 'war' in that its a life-long commitment to being fit and losing the weight and changing bad habits that have accumulated over the years. /end semi-rant.

SHU327
06-18-2009, 03:57 PM
tbh, I'm just going for the 4 key points

1. Eat healthy
2. Eat less
3. Lifting weights / strength training
4. Cardio exercises

Doing this everyday I'm going to lose weight regardless, considering before this point I was eating like ****, eating a lot, and doing zero weights and cardio, so doing a 180 and sticking with this mindset at first sounds like a simple but solid plan for now without going too indepth with meal plans and calorie/carb counting.