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View Full Version : powerlifting form for bench vs. common gym technique question



WyztaTrjnsFtbll
08-09-2009, 09:47 PM
i recently watched a video about powerlifting form with the tight back and pressure on the lats so u can put up more weight and it clearly is the way to go for puttin weight on the bench but if im training not to put weight on my bench but just to train my chest and arms, is this the way to bench? because i feel like the full range of motion with a flat (instead of curved) back would be better for training. (btw i posted a vid recently and found out my benching form sucks and i cant wait to get to the gym and try out this new form)

Future
08-09-2009, 09:49 PM
Its all goal based. Elbows out works the chest more.

MarcusWild
08-09-2009, 10:21 PM
Elbows tucked is safer for your shoulders. If you really want to hit your chest, then do something besides bench with your elbows out. Do flies with dumbbells or something like that.

Future
08-09-2009, 10:24 PM
Ive discussed this idea with some people. What really makes flat bench any worse for the shoulders than other chest pressing exercises?

When someone asks "how much do you lift?" they are referring to? The flat bench. It seems that just more people do it so more people get hurt. I dont agree that the ball and socket is any safer with dumbells or a different angle.

BigTallOx
08-09-2009, 10:34 PM
What really makes flat bench any worse for the shoulders than other chest pressing exercises?


For the shoulders, flat bench is safer than incline bench, decline is safer than flat bench. Tucking is safer for the shoulders than not tucking. That's why powerlifters arch and tuck their elbows when do flat benching, it's safer and stronger.


I dont agree that the ball and socket is any safer with dumbells or a different angle.

Dumbbells are not safer, IMHO.

Future
08-09-2009, 10:48 PM
I do think dumbells can be pretty dangerous...they get away if not use to it.

The arch and tuck styles were more developed for just lifting more. The arch makes the stroke shorter BUT can be very hard on the spine. The tuck tends to be more for shirted benchers while giving some push with the lats more so. I dont know that its safer though.

SELK
08-09-2009, 11:05 PM
Without a bench shirt you don't want to tuck to much. I found that after wearing my shirt for the better part of a training cycle I tried to touch my raw benches to low and was weak on them.

Future
08-09-2009, 11:09 PM
Yeah that was a common issue for me with Westside. I was following information based on that style as my pecs were too weak.

WyztaTrjnsFtbll
08-09-2009, 11:16 PM
is tucking your elbows where the elbows are very close to your body?

backseatwitme13
08-09-2009, 11:30 PM
is tucking your elbows where the elbows are very close to your body?

yes.

Lones Green
08-10-2009, 04:18 AM
i recently watched a video about powerlifting form with the tight back and pressure on the lats so u can put up more weight and it clearly is the way to go for puttin weight on the bench but if im training not to put weight on my bench but just to train my chest and arms, is this the way to bench? because i feel like the full range of motion with a flat (instead of curved) back would be better for training. (btw i posted a vid recently and found out my benching form sucks and i cant wait to get to the gym and try out this new form)

This is the way to go to move more weight, no doubt

mattdunkin
08-10-2009, 06:59 AM
I do think dumbells can be pretty dangerous...they get away if not use to it.

The arch and tuck styles were more developed for just lifting more. The arch makes the stroke shorter BUT can be very hard on the spine. The tuck tends to be more for shirted benchers while giving some push with the lats more so. I dont know that its safer though.

Regardless of wether the person is benching for the purpose of strength or size,tucking of the elbows and a bit lower groove causes much less shoulder rotation and therefore less of a negative stress on the shoulders.For someone who has been training for a fair amount of time,dumbells shouldn't be a problem or dangerous to use for benching.One thing you have to remember is that ANY movement can be a so-called "dangerous" movement and in all reality an exercise done for higher reps at a lighter weight is far more dangerous than a max-effort lift in that there is more time under tension and as the set progresses the form tends to break down leading to a higher propensity for injury.I started bodybuilding 22 years ago,personal training 16 years ago,and switched to powerlifting after a long injury-induced layoff in 2006 so let's just say I have a fair amount of in the gym experience and one thing that drives me crazy is the state of general "fitness" and personal training these days-you see people teaching people to bench totally wrong and to address the issue of shouler health have them stop their benches short even saying this causes more stimulation of the pectoral muscles,when in fact if someone is solely looking to build bigger pecs there are far better movements out there to do so than just barbell benching.Sorry to go off and this was not directed at anyone on this board but I work in a commercial "gym" and see this **** daily,this whole pussification of America thing just really gets to me at times-at least the gyms used to be a safe-haven from it,now they promote it.

barbell01
08-10-2009, 10:02 AM
dont do flys

Travis Bell
08-10-2009, 10:53 AM
The arch and tuck styles were more developed for just lifting more. The arch makes the stroke shorter BUT can be very hard on the spine. The tuck tends to be more for shirted benchers while giving some push with the lats more so. I dont know that its safer though.

Arching is not harder on the spine. You're more likely to get a lower back injury with the way that most people bench, flat backed and their hips moving all over the place. Arching tightens up your core and makes you much more stable when done correctly.

Tucking (as pointed out above) really lowers the amount of shoulder rotation during the lift and takes a ton of stress off your shoulders.

Yes it does indeed help you lift more, but doesn't good form normally do this?

dynamo
08-10-2009, 11:26 AM
I do everything raw, I don't even own/use a belt and I arch and tuck when I bench. I definitely get alot of pec stimulation too, from my own experience, tucking is fantastic. I see alot of guys at my gym lifting with flared elbows and they're also only lifting a third of what I lift. I don't have a huge arch either I just don't like how it feels, but I get a small arch enough to keep my body tight and then of course I lift the weight. arch and tuck ftw!

joey54
08-10-2009, 04:34 PM
I tend to think about this in more simple terms. Use the form which allows you to safely lift the most weight and your arms, chest, and the rest of the involved muscles will grow if you are progressively getting stronger and eating enough to support growth.

gymbo
08-11-2009, 10:07 AM
Correct me if I am wrong but tucking elbows would result in a narrower grip. I was to the assumption that a wideish grip was a good thing.

Travis Bell
08-11-2009, 10:40 AM
Correct me if I am wrong but tucking elbows would result in a narrower grip. I was to the assumption that a wideish grip was a good thing.

No, you don't need to bring your grip in to tuck your elbows

sobrinoc
08-11-2009, 03:01 PM
If you were trying to work out the chest and arms specifically, I wouldn't do a bench press unless it would be to gain more strength in the upper body and overall size. I think to target the chest and arms, weighted dips, weighted pushups and dumbbell benches would be more beneficial. Comparing the bench to an exercise for the chest is like comparing the deadlift for your lower back or the squat for your quads. My 0.02.

SEOINAGE
08-12-2009, 11:21 AM
Take it from someone with shoulder problems, If I don't tuck it will be painful or cause a flair up, and yes arching preserves the natural curvature of your spine and keeps your core tight and strong.

JK1
08-12-2009, 05:56 PM
Funny how noone has mentioned the increased risk of pectoral tendon strain with the elbows out vs tucking.

slashkills
08-12-2009, 07:10 PM
How far in do you tuck? when the bar is near my chest my arms are at about a 45degree angle from my body.

robchris
08-12-2009, 08:36 PM
How far in do you tuck? when the bar is near my chest my arms are at about a 45degree angle from my body.

Thats about what I do... Think, 8 o'clock & 4 o'clock positions.(raw)

I tuck more w/ a shirt though, in order to touch.

RC

cheesedips
08-15-2009, 09:10 AM
im stoopid but if the guy benches 405 not tucked shouldnt he just leave it be?dont fix it aint broke, as long as his rotators are good....?the more i read the more my form changes and gets out of whack, i only bench 300s but seems better if i just pinch my blades and arch very little.....raw=less tuck and higher on chest..right?

Travis Bell
08-15-2009, 10:21 AM
im stoopid but if the guy benches 405 not tucked shouldnt he just leave it be?dont fix it aint broke, as long as his rotators are good....?the more i read the more my form changes and gets out of whack, i only bench 300s but seems better if i just pinch my blades and arch very little.....raw=less tuck and higher on chest..right?

Because if he benches 405 with poor form, when he benches with proper form he'll bench more.

Because if he has poor form, when he benches like that for a longer period of time he's going to eventually ruin his shoulders.

Just because something doesn't hurt now doesn't mean it'll always be that way.

thewicked
08-18-2009, 04:20 PM
there is now powerlifting versus gym benching..

there is proper benching technique and ****ty technique..plain and simple.

the "powerlifting technique" allows for the most efficient and SAFE benching... it sets you up to produce the best bench possible.

joey54
08-18-2009, 07:07 PM
there is now powerlifting versus gym benching..

there is proper benching technique and ****ty technique..plain and simple.

the "powerlifting technique" allows for the most efficient and SAFE benching... it sets you up to produce the best bench possible.

Very good point!

mikesbench
08-18-2009, 09:20 PM
Why would anyone NOT want to bench more AND lift safer at the same time. Powerlifters are the ONLY people that compete in benching, it only makes sense to bench like a powerlifter. If I wanted to learn to swing a golf club, why would I not look at PGA golfers, rather than a bunch of drunk people at a company golf outing? Learn to bench from people who LIVE to bench!

Niko_El_Piko
08-20-2009, 04:53 PM
I absolutely agree with what is said here, regarding the "powerlifting" style, with the arms tucked (needless to say al least 45 in reference with the vertebral spine) and a perfect arch.
Regarding press with dumbells, as long as one maintains the same principles as with the barbell (elbows at 45) and not making that stupid rotation at both ends of the movement, I believe is very good and absolutely safe. I requires some experience, of course.

Regards!

SEOINAGE
08-20-2009, 07:27 PM
Because if he benches 405 with poor form, when he benches with proper form he'll bench more.

Because if he has poor form, when he benches like that for a longer period of time he's going to eventually ruin his shoulders.

Just because something doesn't hurt now doesn't mean it'll always be that way.

These are some great words of wisdom. There are so many situations like this, for instance, the ripped muscular dude has to know what he is talking about.

WyztaTrjnsFtbll
08-20-2009, 10:09 PM
i changed my form and i benched 425 today. it was sick. i am happy. three word sentences. they are fun.

joey54
08-21-2009, 06:07 AM
i changed my form and i benched 425 today. it was sick. i am happy. three word sentences. they are fun.

Good work. New video?

mikesbench
08-21-2009, 06:52 AM
Awesome PR! Hope you like the new technique and stick with it.

WyztaTrjnsFtbll
08-22-2009, 09:39 PM
Good work. New video?

nah sry man it was max outs for the football team and im a freshman and dont wanna be that guy