PDA

View Full Version : Powerlifting & the Internet



Barbaccio
08-28-2009, 09:29 AM
Three years ago, I found Powerlifting. I was lifting in my basement just trying to stay in shape when a friend of mine introduced me to WSB's methods. It piqued my interest, and the more I read, the more I got sucked in. 2 months later I was driving to meet with Shawn Lattimer to don my first piece of equipment, an Inzer Blast shirt.

Fast forward a year. I was doing meets, trying to reach an acceptable total and had hit my first "Elite" total with a 2135 effort. I was on top of the world and, while I realized 2135 wasn't a ground breaking total, it felt incredible to hit a goal I'd worked so hard for.

A few months later I did another meet. I squatted a very high 905. The side judge, being blocked by spotters, gave me the benefit of the doubt and passed the lift. What happened next gave me my first real glimpse of the negative side of our sport. Even after admitting the squat was high I was trolled relentlessly. The judge was ridiculed. The Federation I lifted in was called trash. All because a side judge gave me the benefit of the doubt on a squat he couldn't see because the spotters blocked the view. He did that because he was a lifter too. He understood what it took to train so hard and dedicate yourself to a meet. He felt it served better to hit the white light and give the lifter the benefit of the doubt than red-light for something that was out of the lifters control.

The resultant internet uproar changed the sport for me. I stopped looking up to many of the "big named" lifters. I stopped caring about who did what in what fed. I stopped caring about what went on in the internal affairs of gyms like WSB and BIG. I decided that the only thing that mattered was that I felt my lifts were good and that I had fun. That lasted till a few months ago.

I'm a multi-ply lifter. But what does that even mean anymore? Every call made at a meet is rejudged 1000's of times on video. No squat is ever deep enough, no bench locked even enough, or deadlift not hitched. Rumors of extra plies in shirts, knee wraps sewn in squat suits, etc have killed any passion I have for the gear. Guys in tested Feds being rumored to be on as much if not more gear than those in untested ones. One Fed's judges too critical anotherís too loose. There isn't a standard anymore. You can't compare squats because one guy got away with squatting high and another didn't. There isn't any competition beyond that which you set for yourself. And that's where Iím left at now.

I'm at a crossroads in the sport. I still enjoy training in gear. I love the challenge of trying to learn how to manipulate the shirt and work it to the best of my ability. Trying to find that coveted squat suit that's just tight enough to let you hit parallel but still give you plenty of pop. Trying to squeeze every pound out of a deadlift suit when it's the only real lift that you can't get 100+lbs out of gear with. And then to do all this work and be torn down each meet you do. So go raw right? Great, open yourself up to injury. Get into a whole different debate about whether your "raw" squat was really raw since you used knee wraps or a belt, or hell I've even seen someone say a squat wasn't raw because the guy used wrist wraps? So where do I compete to feel like I can be measured against my peers? Whatís really left? Am I wrong to feel like thereís just really nothing left of the sport anymore?

Then you go to a meet. Tonís of camaraderie, great competition on good terms, lifters helping each other, supporting one another, and the crowd getting behind each and every lifter that takes the platform. Then I remember why I love this sport. Itís not the internet. Not the trolls, not the forums. These things have hurt our sport just as much as theyíve helped it. If all the internet negativity has hurt your passion for our sport then go to a meet. ANY meet. Hell, go watch the Special Olympics and see what itís all about. Go watch a guy entering a meet for the first time and see the fire they have on each and every lift. Thatís what keeps me in the sport. If I donít attend a meet every few months my fire for the sport wanes. Thereís no substitute for the energy and camaraderie of a meet. So if youíre like me and feel like youíre losing the desire, drive, and need to compete or even train. Look for the nearest meet. Go and help. Spot, load, or judge. Just get into that environment. Itíll all come back to you.

sayagain
08-28-2009, 10:05 AM
Awesome post!!! I think you summed up a lot of peoples feelings about this sport at the moment.

Sensei
08-28-2009, 10:09 AM
I agree 100%. Powerlifting is not much of a spectator sport and, after a month or so, internet bashing and worthless debate is no fun whatsoever. If you want to really enjoy powerlifting, you must compete (or coach).

chris mason
08-28-2009, 10:13 AM
Here is what I said about the internet on PLWatch:

"Yes, its the internet. Internet message boards are a forum that can be abused by the angry minority who see it as a way to vent anonymously. In addition, the true idiots also have the personal interaction, the fear that spewing their hatred might get their ass beat in person, removed thus allowing them to act out their idiocy without fear of repercussion. Its funny how pleasant most of the internet pussies that comment negatively on boards like this are in person (or they say NOTHING). THAT is exactly what is happening here."

The internet can both do tremendous good and bad. It is up to the site owners to make sure their site does more good than bad. I think this site is an example. We moderate fairly and get rid of people who just want to spew hate.

JK1
08-28-2009, 10:14 AM
Awesome post!!! I think you summed up a lot of peoples feelings about this sport at the moment.

I agree.

JK1
08-28-2009, 10:22 AM
Here is what I said about the internet on PLWatch:

"Yes, its the internet. Internet message boards are a forum that can be abused by the angry minority who see it as a way to vent anonymously. In addition, the true idiots also have the personal interaction, the fear that spewing their hatred might get their ass beat in person, removed thus allowing them to act out their idiocy without fear of repercussion. Its funny how pleasant most of the internet pussies that comment negatively on boards like this are in person (or they say NOTHING). THAT is exactly what is happening here."

The internet can both do tremendous good and bad. It is up to the site owners to make sure their site does more good than bad. I think this site is an example. We moderate fairly and get rid of people who just want to spew hate.
Chris, as a former moderator on more than one message board, I've seen 1--that right O N E --individual literally tear multiple boards apart. The anonomity that is provided by the internet and the unregulated abuse of freedom of speech sets up a platform that is a recipe for problems. Everyone is a 6 foot 5, 365 lbs of RIPPED to shreds freak with 13 blond virgins, a billion dollars in the bank and a 1,356 lb bench press without a shirt on the internet. This **** is encouraged all too often.

NASAKYCHAIRMAN
08-28-2009, 10:27 AM
WOW!! Great post! The internet hating is the opposite at a powerlifting meets. You have great camaraderie, support and uplifting atmosphere at powerlifting meets. I think the internet haters represent a very, very small percentage of lifters that compete and even smaller percentage of the ones that don't compete.

I have had my share of hating or negative attacks, but I'm laughing all the way to the bank!

The administrators of WBB do a great job to create a learning & uplifting environment.

Unfortunately, it is so much easier to stick to promoting powerlifting, sponsors and yourself. That is what I use the internet for. No shame in my game!

evilxxx
08-28-2009, 11:39 AM
Awesome post! Lattimer still compete? haven't heard anything from him in a long time. Got some good advice from him back when i decided to switch from machines to bars and started powerlifting.

geoffsherman
08-28-2009, 11:59 AM
Why doesn't someone come up with a tool that automatically measures when someone hits depth? I am an engineer by trade and this really isn't a difficult problem to solve. That would then resolve these issues once and for all. People can't understand why Powerlifting isn't taken seriously and now you can see why. Why is it that other sports that require judging don't have this problem? If gymnastics, figure skating, and wrestling can figure it out why can't we.

MarcusWild
08-28-2009, 12:00 PM
I think most of the negativity by "anonymous" on PLW is by people that don't compete and never will compete. Someone said Frankl would total 1500 in the USPF. That's just plain ignorant. I've totaled 1800+ in the USPF and I'm nowhere near Frankl's 2600+ in multi-ply. Whoever said that has obviously never lifted.

Meets are awesome. I go to as many as I can. It seems like I'm at about one a month to lift, coach, or judge. Judging honestly makes me more nervous than lifting. A lot of that is because of the internet BS after the meet.

vdizenzo
08-28-2009, 12:36 PM
Great post Tone. You are a great lifter and a great guy.

I was taught a long time ago that once they talk crap about you it means you have arrived. Well I have arrived and then some according to criticism. The great thing is I rarely if at all respond to it anymore. I have built a body of work in this sport that I am truly proud of. I have nothing to prove to anyone but myself and I have done that. I love this sport with every fiber of my being. I believe I will compete as long as God lets me be on this planet. Two of the greatest feelings in the world are hitting a pr and coaching someone through one. I hope my wife does not read that part. Enjoy your lifting and each other. The internet can be really good or really bad, it's what you make of it. SFW!

MarcusWild
08-28-2009, 02:15 PM
I agree! If the haters on PLW hate you, then you're a strong person. i want to be hated :)

Clifford Gillmore
08-28-2009, 02:42 PM
I have mixed emotions about the internet. I feel EVERY single person out there who hates the guy that rips on everyone else, is disheartning - and its ignorant. One the flip side, without the internet I would NEVER get advice from Travis, Vincent, John Beradi etc. etc. I wish everyone well and I'm happy for all of their milestones and achievements, I hope one day more people will adopt that train of thought.

Travis Bell
08-28-2009, 03:44 PM
I didn't get into powerlifitng until about 5 years ago, so by the time I was into it, the hater thing was pretty much the norm for me. I was reading forums before I even knew what Westside Barbell was to be honest. If it hadn't been for the internet, I'd have never even thought to call Louie and ask him if I could come and train a couple times. What a missed opportunity that'd have been.

I've also been connected to some really cool powerlifters over the time spent on the internet. How often do you get to talk to your heros from sports? Because I'm a bench only lifter, bench stuff sticks out to me, but I'll never forget when Rob Luyando benched 800 at 220lbs. I was just absolutely blown away. I remember honestly being nervous about PMing him on another site.

For me, the good of the internet far outweighs the bad. There is indeed some bad. I've been hated on once or twice for my lifts, but mostly just training videos. I have yet to achieve much in powerlifting that is noteworthy.

As far as the reasons for competing, I've always competed just for me. I love putting my training to the test. I go to a lot of the big meets and get my tail handed to me just about every time, but I will say this, being on the same platform as some of the biggest names in powerlifting is a really inspiring feeling. LOL I went to the raw unity meet last year solely so I could compete with Ryan Celli. While I was frustrated with the performance, I had a ton of fun with him.

If I'm never a world champion, I'm ok with that. Seriously. I want to push myself to be the best, but I'm cool with wherever I end up going. I just love being in the gym around people that I've known for a long time and who also enjoy pushing themselves. Nothing inspires me more than watching someone else hit a PR. A spectator once told me that she laughingly noticed I seemed to get more wound up when Greg or Luke hit a big lift than they did! While I was a little embarrassed at that fact, it most likely was true. Although they just probably express it less because they are tired.

Sean S
08-28-2009, 05:50 PM
If someone just read certain sites on the internet and never went to a meet they would think we were the biggest group of a-holes on the planet. Thankfully I've been to enough meets and trained with enough lifters to know this isn't the case.
On the positive side, the internet has allowed many people to get valuable information and questions answered from experienced lifters. I guess with the good you're always going to get some bad. Seems like about 99% of good lifters I've come across don't pay much attention to negative internet chatter. The good news is that sites like this one and a few others provide valuable information while filtering out most of the stupidity.

dbc3po
08-28-2009, 06:05 PM
Good post Tone. Personally there are only a few sites I even care to go to anymore. This one, the pay site and elite. The rest has to much negative crap. Things should be more about helping and sharing info then what it is.

dammstrate
08-28-2009, 06:53 PM
Tone -
I met you at Skiba's meet in NJ, my son was the 6'8" guy.

I get trolled all the time on Outlaws because I am old, a committed gear whore,
and brag on my wife who is by coefficient WAY better than me. What I have found in 5 years of lifting is:

* trolls don't lift/compete much
* reletively, a few trolls make most of the troll posts
* 99.9% of the people I meet at meets (APF, IPA, USPF, WABDL, even one USAPL meet I went to) are hella cool people, because we are doing something that the rest of the population can not begin to comprehend, THAT'S who/what defines the sport, not the trolls

Have fun with the trolls, interact off the forums with the cool people you meet, and remember the meets define the sport, not the internet.

Lift Strong!

drbill
08-28-2009, 07:56 PM
Great post Tone...I must add how much energy and excitement you bring to meets...I really owe quite a few of my PR's just to you being there...so I'm glad the excitement you bring to the meets is the same you receive...if you're interested in a meet tomorrow in AC come check out the SJ Sports Extravaganza...I'm benching and Latt is doing some arm lifting competition...LMFAO!!! Again...awesome post..glad I read it!!

Ryano
08-28-2009, 08:14 PM
Good post Tone. IMO it's the trolls/anonymous posting that ruins the internet part of it. If they had to put their name on it, most of the negativity wouldn't be there. Everyone may not agree with what I say, but at least my name is on it. I'm the same person on the internet that I am in the warmup room. I recently competed in an SLP meet. ALOT of people bash the SLP, but it was a fun meet. Everyone had a good time and everyone did what they could on the platform. Some got lifts approved that shouldn't have but they left the meet with a smile on their face. No big lifts or all time records, just smiles. That's what counts in life. Not anonymous internet punks.

Cricket_Fire
08-30-2009, 10:47 AM
I feel like the internet has some VERY positive aspects, and some VERY negative ones. All the anonymous, tearing people down, armchair expert stuff can hurt the sport quite a bit. But the internet brought me together with so many people that I would consider good friends.. hell without the internet I don't know if I would be a competetive powerlifter right now.

mikesbench
08-30-2009, 02:55 PM
Awesome post Tone, and great points from Travis too.

It seems funny that the anonymous posters that like to trash everyone's accoplishments seem to take those accomplishmets far more seriously than those that actually acheive something.

It's like they take it as a personal atack on their own weakness while we're continuously looking forward to the next goal, next meet, next PR.. too focused to being dragged down by them and to driven to quit

mattdunkin
08-30-2009, 03:17 PM
Thanks for your post Tone,because I think you really hit the nail on the head.I agree with another poster that said for the most part the trolls don't even compete and I'd be shocked if they even train seriously.When you go to a meet there is never the b.s. that you read online and the only time I've ever heard b.s. comments were on 2 different occasions by idiot spectators that had never been to a meet and were your typical gym rats with no knowledge of powerlifting.I lift for myself and this is an underground sport and that is why I like it-god forbid you'd ever see tools walking around in Westside Barbell t-shirts like you do the Tap-Out do*che-bags.I think the internet can be a great tool but you got to filter out the crap and not let it get to you which is hard sometimes-hell,when I first got back into training and started powerlifting full-time in 2006 a lot had changed and Tone had posted something in a god-awful Myspace forum that totally helped my bench and I'll never forget that-hell,I even would message him some of the dumbest questions looking back on it now.The downside is a lot of the top guys get sick of the trolling and b.s. and don't even post,though and that is a shame-especially when the as!holes posting couldn't even hold their briefs.Anyway,thanks for the great post brother.

robchris
08-30-2009, 04:17 PM
Tone,

Great post brother... The PL'ing community is one of the most supportive, hardworking group of people I've ever meet. The pro's far out weigh the con's even on the internet.
I feel WBB is by far the best PL forum on the web... Thanks moderator's for the fine job you guys do! (no trolls allowed!)

RC

KarlMarx
08-30-2009, 06:53 PM
People can't understand why Powerlifting isn't taken seriously and now you can see why. Why is it that other sports that require judging don't have this problem? If gymnastics, figure skating, and wrestling can figure it out why can't we.

Having been in wrestling, I can say they DO NOT have the ref'ing thing worked out! LOL But I do not really think people think powerlifting is a joke either. I know a lot of people have that opinion that other people think it is a joke (and this isn't mainly directed at you Geoff) but it doesn't seem as true to me as many seem to think. I have just come to PL recently, before I was just lifting for jujitsu/mma. People who I told I was going to start powerlifting seemed impressed or just thought I was crazy because I was sure to hurt myself. I guess some people think the steroids makes it a freak show, but they still respect it--in the same way the respect rally car drivers or those guys that jump off of huge ramps on bikes/cars/skateboards, etc.--people who risk health and devote themselves to things the average person just couldn't do. Really, if powerlifting has a negative image problem its that people don't know what it is. Everybody that I mention it to think it is O.lifting.

Anyway, I love the training. Even if there wasn't meets, or the internet, etc. I'd still do it. Battle my buddies for bragging rights maybe.

douglasoh5
08-30-2009, 07:05 PM
Tone you think to much...just lift....train...do a meet then repeat...thats a kool little post for all the douche bags....but you could have been thinking about how to get your squat up instead you did that...

Beverly McD.
08-31-2009, 06:44 AM
I don't pay much attention to "anonymous". If they don't have enough regard and value for their own opinion to put their name to it, why should I?

BigTallOx
08-31-2009, 09:44 AM
Why doesn't someone come up with a tool that automatically measures when someone hits depth? I am an engineer by trade and this really isn't a difficult problem to solve.

I don't think any tool would be any more reliable than an impartial, trained human's eye. What I don't understand is why the judges don't give a command when you've hit depth, similar to the "press" command when benching.




Why is it that other sports that require judging don't have this problem? If gymnastics, figure skating, and wrestling can figure it out why can't we.

Figure skating doesn't have problems with judging? I don't follow ice skating, but it seems they've had plenty of issues with their judging system.

But maybe you're on to something, powerlifting needs to have an "artistic impression" score as well as your total weight lifted. You're get extra points for how much ammonia you sniff, how hard your girl friend/wife slaps you in the face, etc. That'd be cool, and it'd make powerlifting much more of a spectator sport,lol

evilxxx
08-31-2009, 10:02 AM
I don't think any tool would be any more reliable than an impartial, trained human's eye. What I don't understand is why the judges don't give a command when you've hit depth, similar to the "press" command when benching.




Figure skating doesn't have problems with judging? I don't follow ice skating, but it seems they've had plenty of issues with their judging system.

But maybe you're on to something, powerlifting needs to have an "artistic impression" score as well as your total weight lifted. You're get extra points for how much ammonia you sniff, how hard your girl friend/wife slaps you in the face, etc. That'd be cool, and it'd make powerlifting much more of a spectator sport,lol

Now thats a great idea! LOL

also take point away for mixing gear brands, too much hair(males only),ripped abs(bad for benching),flat foot(advantage for DL's)

Seriously, an "UP" command for the squat would be nice.

dynamo
08-31-2009, 10:11 AM
Now thats a great idea! LOL

also take point away for mixing gear brands, too much hair(males only),ripped abs(bad for benching),flat foot(advantage for DL's)

Seriously, an "UP" command for the squat would be nice.

Oh snap...I've never been to a meet but I would've figured they give an up command...I wonder if you can ask the judges to give an up command just before you lift.

Beverly McD.
08-31-2009, 10:29 AM
Usually a training partner calls "up". A judge would be glad to call you in the warm-up room though.

dynamo
08-31-2009, 10:41 AM
you know....they could just hook up a laser to the monolift or whatever they use for squats, and adjust it to be right at the top of the knee and then you would have a nice straight line for viewing if they hit parallel or not. it would be cheap, easy, and take out the guess work fer sher.

BigTallOx
08-31-2009, 10:57 AM
you know....they could just hook up a laser to the monolift or whatever they use for squats, and adjust it to be right at the top of the knee and then you would have a nice straight line for viewing if they hit parallel or not. it would be cheap, easy, and take out the guess work fer sher.

OK, but not everybody's shins stay perpendicular to the floor, so the height of the top of the knee changes during the squat.

But personally, I like this, it would help me because my shins do not stay exactly perpendicular, the top of my knee gets slightly lower as I squat. So this would raise parallel for me if the height of the laser was set when I'm standing. But it wouldn't help you if your shins do stay perpendicular to the floor during your squat. That doesn't exactly seem fair to me.

BigTallOx
08-31-2009, 10:59 AM
Usually a training partner calls "up". A judge would be glad to call you in the warm-up room though.

I know, but the a training partner isn't the judge and their view of where parallel is for a given lifter may not agree. But I'm not arguing against the current system. Nothing is perfect, not even a laser solution, but the current way seems to be the best to me.

JPanella
08-31-2009, 11:06 AM
The internet is a great tool, especially for new guys who are trying to hook up with a training crew. It is how i ended up meeting Joel Toranzo, who got me started. Through him i got to train with Bernor, Taylor and the rest of the Iron Island crew. The rest of the crap on the internet is mainly a problem because people post annonymously. If people had to post under thier real name powerliftingwatch and other places wouldn't be such a sewer.

Travis Bell
08-31-2009, 11:06 AM
OK, but not everybody's shins stay perpendicular to the floor, so the height of the top of the knee changes during the squat.

But personally, I like this, it would help me because my shins do not stay exactly perpendicular, the top of my knee gets slightly lower as I squat. So this would raise parallel for me if the height of the laser was set when I'm standing. But it wouldn't help you if your shins do stay perpendicular to the floor during your squat. That doesn't exactly seem fair to me.

How do your knees get lower as you squat?

I would imagine that'd make you go deeper, if the point of reference goes lower, and you have to go lower than the point of reference, you are going to have to go deeper

I think the laser idea does have some merit, but I think you'd find a lot of resistence to it at the beginning because meet directors already have to spend enough money as it is, without adding a laser to the mix, plus the apparatus needed to hold it and make it adjustable.

I could see everyone getting their laser height as they decide on their rack height, but it'd also extend the length of the meet as the laser would have to be readjusted each attempt.

It still wouldn't be fool proof. Judges would still need to watch the hip joint, which on big guys is really difficult sometimes.

I don't know, I'm not creative enough to think of something practical enough LOL

SELK
08-31-2009, 12:06 PM
they get lower to the ground because they start to drift forward, since the shin pivots from the ankle they are traveling in an arc, as the knee drifts forward (past 0 degrees, anyway) it will be closer to the ground, the more drift, the closer it will get. An olympic lifters knee for example will travel closer to the ground then a multiply squatter.


The only reason I powerlift is because I enjoy it. The day I stop enjoying it I will quit. There is no money, no fame, and its expensive. I don't care about world records, I care about my records.

dynamo
08-31-2009, 12:16 PM
How do your knees get lower as you squat?

I would imagine that'd make you go deeper, if the point of reference goes lower, and you have to go lower than the point of reference, you are going to have to go deeper

I think the laser idea does have some merit, but I think you'd find a lot of resistence to it at the beginning because meet directors already have to spend enough money as it is, without adding a laser to the mix, plus the apparatus needed to hold it and make it adjustable.

I could see everyone getting their laser height as they decide on their rack height, but it'd also extend the length of the meet as the laser would have to be readjusted each attempt.

It still wouldn't be fool proof. Judges would still need to watch the hip joint, which on big guys is really difficult sometimes.

I don't know, I'm not creative enough to think of something practical enough LOL


you know I was just thinking duct tape but I suppose it would have to be a little more professional than that. I am certain you could make a formula for leg length and depth and height from the floor to the bum, but then why not just have a guy look and call it, right? Hell...you could just take a stick, tape it to the guys leg and have a rope hanging from it with a wiffle ball and once the string with the wiffle ball is completely perpendicular to the ground you know hes parallel no questions asked.

BigTallOx
08-31-2009, 12:31 PM
How do your knees get lower as you squat?


When I start my squat, my shins are pretty perpendicular to the floor, looking from the side that is. When I'm at the bottom of my squat, my shins are not perpendicular to the floor, so my knees have to be lower. It's not much lower, but it's lower. I'm trying to change this by squatting wider, but that seems to be taking some time to get there.

BigTallOx
08-31-2009, 12:37 PM
I am certain you could make a formula for leg length and depth and height from the floor to the bum,


Sure, in theory you *could* but it would be a complicated formula. Since the definition of parallel is in terms of the crease of the hip, if the output of the formula is the height of the bottom of the bum, the formula would have to include how big the person's glutes are ( probably hamstrings too ). I don't really want a judge having to measure my glutes and hams to be able to determine if I'm parallel or not.

Travis Bell
08-31-2009, 12:39 PM
you know I was just thinking duct tape but I suppose it would have to be a little more professional than that. I am certain you could make a formula for leg length and depth and height from the floor to the bum, but then why not just have a guy look and call it, right? Hell...you could just take a stick, tape it to the guys leg and have a rope hanging from it with a wiffle ball and once the string with the wiffle ball is completely perpendicular to the ground you know hes parallel no questions asked.

have you been to a meet before though?

That would be a super super complicated way of doing things

Have to be honest. If I saw a whiffle ball and bat at a meet, I'd be more likely to end up hitting Lones in the head with it just to see what happened.

Hazerboy
08-31-2009, 12:41 PM
I think a lot of guys problems is powerlifting forums are their first exposure to people of the internet/forums in general.

Trolls have been here and they will continue to be here. Its part of the internet lol, people will hate on you. Why should powerlifting be different? Some people out there are just *******s.

dynamo
08-31-2009, 12:42 PM
have you been to a meet before though?

That would be a super super complicated way of doing things

Have to be honest. If I saw a whiffle ball and bat at a meet, I'd be more likely to end up hitting Lones in the head with it just to see what happened.

lol nah i've never been, i've seen some videos though, pretty hectic up until the lift it seems

Lones Green
08-31-2009, 01:15 PM
have you been to a meet before though?

That would be a super super complicated way of doing things

Have to be honest. If I saw a whiffle ball and bat at a meet, I'd be more likely to end up hitting Lones in the head with it just to see what happened.

LOL! A meet/whiffle ball game...this might be what we need to get powerlifting in the olympics

sayagain
08-31-2009, 01:16 PM
That would be funny. Good luck running the bases with knee wraps on.

Lones Green
08-31-2009, 01:21 PM
That would be funny. Good luck running the bases with knee wraps on.

I'd pay good money to see a bunch of fat guys geared up playing whiffle ball. Imagine trying to hit a home run in a shirt